Tag Archive | "smartphone"

A new major smartphone maker has just landed in Europe


Vivo X51 holding it in the hand showing the rear housing

Credit: Ryan-Thomas Shaw / Android Authority
  • Vivo has come to Europe and the UK.
  • The Vivo X51 5G is the first phone to hit the markets.
  • It’s essentially a renamed Vivo X50 Pro.

Vivo is generally ranked as one of the top six or seven smartphone manufacturers in the world, and it’s been gradually growing its global footprint in recent times. The brand launched in several markets in the Middle East and Africa last year, and it’s now launching in Europe and the UK.

The first phone as part of the Chinese brand’s entry into Europe is the Vivo X51 5G, which is essentially a Vivo X50 Pro with minor tweaks to software. Much like the X50 Pro, the X51 5G packs an upper mid-range Snapdragon 765G chipset, a 90Hz FHD+ OLED panel, and a 4,315mAh battery with 33W wired charging. The latter sees your phone going from zero to 100% capacity in a respectable 68 minutes.

The biggest reason to get the X51 5G might be the cameras though, packing a 48MP f/1.6 main camera (IMX598) with “gimbal” OIS for superior stabilization. Our own Dhruv Bhutani thought the X50 Pro’s identical camera setup yielded “incredible” low light images and “exemplary” 4K/60fps video performance. So we’re definitely expecting the same results from the X51 5G.

Other rear cameras include an 8MP ultra-wide camera and a pair of zoom-related shooters. An 8MP periscope lens handles 5x optical zoom shots, while a 13MP sensor handles 2x snaps and portrait shots. A punch-hole cutout up front plays host to a 32MP shooter.

Vivo X51 holding in the hand showing the home screen

Credit: Ryan-Thomas Shaw / Android Authority

So what are those aforementioned tweaks to software, then? Well, Vivo notes that it worked with Google to make FunTouchOS more in line with stock Android and “close to European user habits.” It’s unclear if these changes are purely for European/global users or if it’s part of a wider revamp of Vivo’s Android skin. We’ve asked the company for more details and will update the article accordingly. Still, we’re glad to see a more stock-like look and feel as prior versions of Vivo’s skin looked like a poor iOS imitation.

Vivo also addressed software update commitments, although it may have left us with more questions than answers.

“Based on our long-term cooperation with Google, Vivo products will comply with Google’s Android security update rules. We provide software support during a period of four years, and Google security updates up to three years for X51,” the company told us in a briefing. We’re not really sure what “software support” entails but we’re guessing this doesn’t mean Android version updates, as security update pledges tend to outlast version update commitments.

In any event, other notable Vivo X51 5G features include Android 10 (with Android 11 coming “soon”), Bluetooth 5.1, dual-SIM connectivity, an in-display fingerprint sensor, and NFC. The phone starts at £749 for the sole 8GB/256GB variant in the UK. There’s no word on Euro pricing, but Vivo says the phone will be available in Germany, France, Spain, Italy and Poland.

Vivo also noted that it’s in talks with retailers and carriers about stocking phones. Looking for flagship Vivo phones like the Nex series or Vivo products other than phones in Europe? Well, the brand says you should “watch this space.”

Next: Who is BBK, the world’s second largest phone manufacturer?


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Poll: Do you edit your smartphone photos?


Sony Xperia 1 II taking a photo outside

Many smartphones take great photos with no editing necessary, whether it’s a camera-focused flagship like the Sony Xperia 1 II or an affordable-yet-mighty device like Google’s Pixel 4a. It’s nonetheless tempting to make a few edits, and not just for the sake of accuracy. Punchy colors and elaborate filters can help your phone photos stand out on social media, and sometimes add fun to an otherwise plain image.

There are a number of ways to edit your smartphone photos, though. You might only lightly retouch your pictures to fix flaws and deliver truer-to-life colors, or you might use an in-depth editor to turn your photos into fanciful art. And that’s assuming you edit your photos in the first place — you might be a purist who prefers to share photos in their original form, quirks and all.

Please wait.. Loading poll

If you find yourself frequently taking snapshots, then, there’s a simple question: how do you usually edit photos on or from your phone? Do you do little besides crop your shots, or do you spend ages finessing your images before anyone else sees them?

Read more: The best camera apps for Android

It doesn’t matter what app you use to edit photos, just the amount of effort involved and the results you produce. You can use the default editing tools that shipped with your phone, a simple-but-free app or a sophisticated creative tool that requires a subscription. You don’t have to edit on your phone, either — you’re just as welcome if you prefer to labor over your photos using a dedicated editing suite on your PC.

As usual, please let us know what you think by voting in the poll and sharing your approach in the comments below. We’re eager to know how many of you aspire to be a smartphone-toting Ansel Adams or Annie Leibovitz.


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What was the worst year in modern smartphone history?


Google Calendar stock photo 3

We’d like to think that each year is a bonanza when it comes to smartphone releases, but some years are definitely worse than others.

We’ve already chosen 2014 as the best year of the last decade, but what about the worst years in modern smartphone history? Well, we can think of a few middling or even disappointing years in our book. Whether it was a general trend that was adopted by everyone or just several companies releasing bad phones in one year, you can check out our five picks below. Don’t forget to take our poll at the end of the article!

As bad as 2020 is so far (i.e. ludicrously expensive phones, power-sapping 5G and screens, oh… and delays caused by a global pandemic), we’re excluding it from the list as the year isn’t over yet. But it’s definitely a dishonorable mention.

2010

Samsung Galaxy S Original

The Samsung Galaxy S
Credit: Samsung
  • This was the year that saw manufacturers and networks play hard and fast with the term 4G. From Wi-Max to HSPA, there was no shortage of brands claiming that their technology was indeed 4G. For what it’s worth, LTE and HSPA+ were generally considered to be proper 4G at the time.
  • Microsoft also launched the promising but ill-fated Windows Phone 7 platform, with the firm going so far as to hold a mock funeral for the iPhone at the time. If that wasn’t bad enough, the company also released two smart feature phones dubbed Kin that were terrible and mercifully became discontinued after only two months.
  • The iPhone 4 release was marred by “antennagate” after it emerged that the phone drastically lost signal when you held it… like a phone. It didn’t help that Apple initially told customers to stop holding it in the lower-left corner, before eventually offering a free bumper case to users.
  • It was a tough time to be a Nokia fan as the firm still stuck with Symbian for the most part. Sure, you had the Nokia N8 with its fantastic 12MP camera and the slick Nokia E7, but who cared when they ran a slow, unintuitive platform that was practically held together with duct-tape? At least we got the Meego-toting Nokia N9 and the first Nokia Windows Phones in 2011.
  • Samsung also launched the Galaxy S in 2010, kicking off the all-conquering Galaxy flagship range. Unfortunately, a US court ruled that the manufacturer had actually copied the iPhone’s design and software flourishes in the process. And it’s hard to argue otherwise when you look at the two side-by-side, serving as more ammunition against Android and Samsung for Apple fans.

2013

HTC First review

The HTC First

  • The Galaxy S4 may have been the best-selling Android phone of all time, but Samsung definitely made a few bad decisions regarding it. Unarguably the biggest issue was the bloated software that was TouchWiz, as the firm tossed in a ton of features without considering performance. Throw in a cringeworthy launch event stacked with plenty of awful stereotypes and it definitely makes our list.
  • HTC debuted the HTC One M7 in 2013, which earned a reputation as one of the best phones of all time. The company also debuted the ill-fated HTC First that year, which was not one of the best phones of all time. The First was made in partnership with Facebook, running the Facebook Home launcher (remember that?) and offering solid specs for the time. The Facebook integration couldn’t save the phone from poor sales, reportedly moving just 15,000 units.
  • BlackBerry 10 was finally released in early 2013, delivering a proper touch-focused platform that was built from the ground up. This wasn’t enough to save the company though, as Android delivered more variety and apps (even though BB10 supported many Android apps). Another major blow was the fact that the BlackBerry Internet Service (which was available as an all-you-can-eat plan in many regions) wasn’t supported on the new platform. I know tens of people who lost interest in new BlackBerry phones when it emerged that BIS wouldn’t be available.
  • Apple’s iOS 7 also made headlines in 2013 for the wrong reasons, as the update introduced a host of bugs and crashes. From connectivity woes and iMessage issues to (ironically) the Blue Screen of Death, this was an update that the Cupertino company and customers would like to forget.

2015

  • The Snapdragon 810 flagship silicon reportedly suffered from manufacturing woes, with many early phones powered by the chipset said to have performance or thermal-related issues. Early testing by the likes of Ars Technica showed major performance drops as phones with the processor heated up.
  • The HTC One M9 was a disappointing follow-up to the fantastic device that was the One M8, offering a less capable camera for low-light shooting and worse endurance. This also marked the third time we saw the metal design, with only minor changes compared to the HTC One M7. Truth be told, it seems like HTC never really recovered from this release.
  • Samsung’s Galaxy S6 series offered an all-new glass design, but ditched water-resistance, microSD storage, and a removable battery to get there. And the tiny battery in the standard S6 only added more salt to the wound.
  • This year also seems to have marked the start of LG’s bootloop issues, as the likes of the LG G4, Nexus 5X, and LG V10 all experienced this major problem to some extent. Cue the photoshopped Froot Loops images.

2016

  • Samsung’s Galaxy S7 series was one of the best phones of 2016, but the year will always be remembered for the company launching the IED that was the Galaxy Note 7. Faulty batteries and over-ambitious design resulted in phones that were susceptible to bursting into flames. No wonder the company offered an update that killed the phone entirely.
  • The year also saw brands ditch the headphone port, with Android players like Motorola and LeEco doing so. Apple did the same with the iPhone 7, and we’ve seen loads of companies follow suit since then.
  • LG had a run of solid to great high-end phones up until 2016, when it launched the modular LG G5. The phone’s magazine slot-style design enabled you to use add-ons like a 360 camera and a Hi-Fi DAC. Unfortunately, a combination of questionable build quality, a smaller battery than the G4, and very few Friends (as the add-ons were called) killed any hopes of major success. At least the firm also offered an ultra-wide camera that’s now become standard on almost every major phone.

2019

Samsung Galaxy Fold Review against the wall

  • The Pixel 4 delivered a smaller battery than previous Pixels, no fingerprint scanner in lieu of face unlock only, and gimmicky Motion Sense tech. No wonder many reviewers derided it at launch. At least the company introduced a long-overdue budget phone in the Pixel 3a.
  • Foldable phones were supposed to be the big thing in 2019, but the first wave of foldables made us realize just how fragile they could be. Between the Galaxy Fold’s delayed launch due to hinge/screen issues and the general trend of scratch-prone plastic screens (including the Mate X), foldables definitely fell short of the hype.
  • Arguably the biggest disappointment in 2019 was the US ban against Huawei, instituted in May. This meant that phones released after this point lacked Google services. It’s a real shame, because phones like the Mate 30 Pro were definitely among the best phones of the year on paper, but the lack of GMS means it’s a no-go for many.
  • Up until 2019, Samsung’s Galaxy Note series was known as the range of choice for power users looking for a quality, feature-packed phone. Unfortunately, the vanilla Galaxy Note 10 failed to live up to this ethos. Your $ 950 got you a battery that was significantly smaller than the Plus model and Note 9, no microSD card slot, and no 3.5mm port. The Plus variant also lacked the latter two features, but at least you got extras like a bigger battery, QHD+ screen, and faster charging.

What do you think was the worst year for smartphones? Take our poll below and leave a comment!

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Poco’s next smartphone confirmed to launch in this quarter


Poco Season 2

Xiaomi-backed Poco recently spun off into an independent company. At the time, it was unclear how Poco would operate without Xiaomi and the kind of devices it’ll launch as a standalone entity.

Now, in a series of interviews with Gadgets 360 and Hindustan Times (HT) , Poco India’s General Manager, C Manmohan has revealed what’s in store for the company and its consumers.

When is the next Poco phone coming?

Manmohan has confirmed that Poco’s next smartphone will launch as early as this quarter. That means we can expect a successor to the Poco F1 by March this year. The company has already started teasing a Season 2 for Poco, hinting at the imminent launch of the new device.

Related: The next Poco device could be a rebranded Redmi K30

As per Manmohan, the brand will stick to its core philosophy of offering a value-for-money proposition. He reportedly said that the next Poco phone will feature a “top-end SoC” and a “large amount of RAM”.

What about the phone’s software?

The upcoming Poco phone and its successors will continue to use MIUI for Poco. “Some of my Poco fans say that it is much more stock Android-ish,” Manmohan told Gadgets 360.

“So essentially, we are kind of, leveraging that and with our Poco fans feedback and the community feedback, we’ll work towards making it much more better and better,” he added.

Will Poco share resources with Xiaomi?

The Poco India GM confirmed that the company will use some of Xiaomi’s resources for the time being.

Speaking to HT he said that the Poco would leverage Xiaomi’s supply chain and after sales resources. It will pay for Xiaomi’s services and have its own sales, marketing, and product teams.

He also admitted that Poco will compete with Mi and Redmi in the market. However, the company is yet to decide the price segment in which it’ll operate.

What about launching Poco phones globally?

Poco’s comeback plans are currently limited to India. Gadgets 360 reports, “It doesn’t have any relation with the global operations of the brand Poco that is named Pocophone.”

According to Manmohan, Poco’s global launch plans are still undecided. He said, “It might take some more time for us to kind of validate that.”


What are your thoughts on Poco’s comeback strategy? Do you think it can recreate the success of the Poco F1? Do you have a wish list for the next Poco smartphone? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

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Smartphone quiz: Does it have this feature?


Samsung Galaxy Buds sitting on phone

This quiz will test out just how familiar you really are with some of the best Android phones out there. All you have to do is figure out whether a phone in question has a feature like an in-display fingerprint scanner, a headphone jack, a pop up selfie camera, or any other that’s mentioned.

Are you up for the challenge? Press the Start button below and show us what you got — and don’t forget to share your score on social media at the end.

Note: If you don’t see a Start button, click here.


This is the 71st quiz in our regular weekly series. You can take a few of the most popular ones via the links below or check out all of them by clicking here.

Let us know which questions you thought were the hardest and share your result with others in the comments!

More posts about Pop quizzes


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Compact camera vs smartphone shootout: It’s not even close


https://youtu.be/kd5JVV99uZI

Point-and-shoot camera sales have seen a significant decline worldwide according to many studies. With smartphone cameras improving exponentially in the past few years, it raises the question: Are point-and-shoot cameras actually worth it anymore, or should you just buy a top camera phone? We decided to put it to the test with a compact camera vs smartphone shootout.

We pitched a high-end compact camera (the $ 600 Sony RX100 IV) against a couple of the top camera phones of 2019 (the Google Pixel 4 and Huawei P30 Pro). We took the same photos and videos with each device in “Photo” and “Auto” modes from the phones and camera, respectively. Portrait mode was also used where labeled. To put the devices through their paces, we shot a range of subjects in a myriad of lighting conditions. Low light, landscape, HDR, portrait, color, detail, selfie, video, and zoom aspects were all tested in this experiment.

We highly recommend clicking on each image to more closely examine the details. Also, all test images are available at full resolution in a Google Drive folder here.

Low light

For low light, I shot the front of a supermarket at around 6PM. At this point in the UK, the sky was completely black and the lights in the foyer were very bright. This would challenge the dynamic range and low-light capabilities of any camera system.

From a distance, the standout photo comes from the Pixel 4. It retains the color information in the store logo, whilst still showing the most detail in the car park. The Rx100’s image is easily the worst here. From the overexposed logo, to the lack of any detail in the shadows, the RX100 falls on its face compared to the other two. The Huawei phone sits in the middle as it keeps detail from both the highlights and shadows, but can’t quite get the color right on the blue banner in the middle of the frame.

Related: How are smartphone cameras becoming so good in low light?

Color

To test the color quality and accuracy of each camera, I leaned my mountain bike up against a bench in a park. This was on a relatively sunny day in an open space, to also push the dynamic range capabilities.

Instantly, the Sony’s image stands out due to its heavily overexposed sky, big flare on the fork, and lack of detail on the tires. The Pixel 4 seems to be the darkest image of the bunch, yet still retains more detail on the tires than the RX100. The winner is the P30 Pro as it captures the most dynamic range, whilst keeping the scene well exposed, and the colors accurate.

Detail

Next, I went to the beach and took a photo of a river running down into the sea. This would test detail in the tiny waves, as well as dynamic range. For the best look, I recommend clicking on each image to examine the finer details.

This set of testing is a little harder to compare, given that you really have to zoom in to see the difference in detail. The Rx100 really got to stretch its legs here as it has the only native 24MP sensor of the bunch and so its detail resolving capabilities are the best. The Pixel 4 provides a brighter image, but its version is a lot muddier when zooming in. The P30 Pro is, again, a middle ground. When looking closely, it doesn’t quite have the sharpness and detail of the Sony, but has more accurate colors.

Selfie

I took a selfie with each phone in my bedroom with a warm color source on the left and a cooler one on the right. I was stood in front of a 5600K softbox light. Naturally, the Sony is the favorite to win due to the fact that its main sensor is also the selfie sensor. The shots were taken on “Portrait” and “Auto” modes from the phones and camera, respectively.

With these selfies, I wanted to test skin-tone capturing performance as well as the portrait effect of the smartphones. Straight away, the RX100 has a tough time getting my skin right, giving the image a blue cast throughout. Granted, the sharpness is the best by a long shot, but it isn’t enough. The Pixel 4 gives the shallowest depth of field, but my skin is a bit too orange and the highlight reduction is a bit too aggressive. The best image is by the P30 Pro, thanks to its accurate color across the frame.

Related: Best selfie sticks for smartphones

HDR

To test the HDR capabilities to the extreme, I shot almost directly at the sun with a rocky wall and some buildings in the foreground.

Right off the mark, the Rx100 flares incredibly easily and has the least shadow detail. Seeing the buildings in line with the sun is relatively light work for the two phones, but the standalone camera really can’t handle it very well. The Pixel 4 seems to retain the most shadow detail as seen in the rocky wall. However, the P30 Pro handles highlights a lot better as illustrated in the clouds at the top of the image.

Zoom

My house’s chimney happened to be the subject of this set of tests. Each camera was dialed into its maximum optical zoom. The fine details in the bricks and chimney stacks should help us determine the camera with the best zoom.

At 135mm (Full Frame equivalent) the P30 Pro zooms in far further than either of its competition — it absolutely steamrolls the others in this test. The RX100’s 70mm and Pixel’s 50mm are woeful on paper when compared with the P30 Pro. However, even though the Sony zooms further than the Pixel, the difference in clarity, dynamic range, and color is crazy. I’d take the Pixel’s image over the RX100’s every day of the week.

Read more: Huawei P30 Pro camera review: Next level optics, low-light champion

Portrait

My friend Ross with a bucket on his head is the subject with floodlights above and a driving range behind him. There are wet golf balls on the grass reflecting light to create bokeh balls. The shots were taken on “Portrait” and “Auto” modes from the phones and camera, respectively.

The Pixel 4’s image doesn’t quite get the white balance right, opting for more of a warm tone. The background blur, however, emulates a much faster lens and produces larger bokeh balls. The RX100 pulls back the saturation a little too far and offers the greatest depth of field, here. The P30 Pro is a great representation of real life in terms of color, along with giving a nice soft background.

Video

For the video tests, I ran all three devices in video mode, handheld, as I stood above a beach near sunset time. All devices were set to a matched resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 or Ultra HD at 30fps.

I was fully expecting the RX100 to beat the other two. However, I was surprised to find the P30 Pro to be the best at taking video in this scenario. The stability is most gimbal-like, the dynamic range is the best, and the exposure is near perfect in this scene. The Pixel 4 gets close but isn’t quite sharp enough due to the less-than-perfect conditions. In the upset of the decade, the RX100 loses this test due to its footage being the most shakey, the worst exposed, and having the worst dynamic range.

Compact camera vs smartphone: The verdict

P30 Pro vs RX100 vs Pixel 4 camera stood up - Compact camera vs smartphone

I came into this shootout predicting that the RX100 would win more than one test. In fact, I would have thought that at the very least, it’d smash the others in the video comparison. Little did I realize just how far smartphone photography had come and how much better the images would come out compared to the compact camera. One pattern that reoccurred is that the P30 constantly gave the most accurate result, even if it wasn’t the prettiest. What I’ve learned is that there is little justification for an expensive compact camera in 2019. Your phone will likely do everything you need to it do, even better than the likes of the RX100.

Higher quality RAW photos are definitely the strong suit of the RX100, allowing for more data to be pulled from an image, allowing for far more processing headroom after the fact. But that’s not the idea of a point-and-shoot camera; the idea is to pick it up, take a photo, and put it down knowing that you don’t have to fiddle with settings or editing.

Smartphones are designed from the ground up with point-and-shoot in mind as evident in their heavy processing pipelines. Whilst compact camera makers like Sony are attempting to strike back (the RX100 Mark 7 has a 24-200mm zoom range!), the EIS, HDR+, portrait, and night mode innovations that we’ve seen on smartphones are straight-up outpacing them.

Compact, point-and-shoot cameras might not be dead, but that gap is closing and manufacturers like Canon, Sony, and Panasonic really need to wise up.

Buy The Huawei P30 ProBuy The Google Pixel 4Buy The Sony RX100 IV

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Readers’ Choice: What’s the best smartphone of 2019? (Update: Final two!)


Update: Tuesday, December 24, 2019: We asked you to vote on YouTube and Twitter to decide which two Best of Android Readers’ Choice smartphones would make it to the final round. Out of nearly 31,000 total votes, the results are in:

  1. Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus: 13,785 votes (45% of overall votes)
  2. OnePlus 7T Pro: 8,857 votes (29% of overall votes)
  3. Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus: 4,570 votes (14% of overall votes)
  4. OnePlus 7T: 3,966 votes (12% of overall votes)

Before you leave, we still need your help! We’ve published two more polls on Facebook and Instagram (found below) to crown the overall winner between the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus and OnePlus 7T Pro. Cast your vote in the polls below, and come back tomorrow to see which phone wins the Best of Android 2019 Readers’ Choice Award!


It’s hard to believe it, but 2019 is finally coming to a close. Earlier this year, you voted on the best smartphone of early 2019, but now it’s time to crown the final champion of the year!

There are many factors that go into deciding what’s worthy of being called “the best.” On Friday, we announced our picks for the Best of Android, based solely on objective testing across several categories including display, battery, camera, performance, and audio. There’s more to a good phone than just the hardware, however. Objective testing only tells one side of the story and doesn’t account for intangibles like software update frequency, user interface, or even value for money. To address this, we also brought you our Editors’ Choice pick for the Best of Android. But what about our readers? Now it’s your turn to have a say.

The Best of Android Readers’ Choice Award gives our readers the opportunity to crown the phone you collectively feel stood out as the best of 2019.

Best of Android Readers’ Choice: Here’s how it works

What’s the best phone according to our readers? We’re bringing the choice to readers on the site, as well as to those who follow us on social. This will happen in three phases:

  • Day 1 (today): To kick things off, you’ll find a pool of 12 phones (below) that performed well in our objective testing. It’s up to you to pick your favorite and help us narrow down the options. The poll will be live for 24 hours.
  • Day 2 (December 23): We’ll follow up with a Twitter and YouTube Community polls that will consist of a shorter list of four phones narrowed down from the top performers from today’s vote.
  • Day 3 (December 24): On day three, we will post the two finalists in polls on Facebook and Instagram.
  • Day 4 (Christmas Day): On Christmas Day, we’ll formally announce the top winner.

Best of Android Readers’ Choice: Cast your vote!

Head to our Instagram Story to vote for the two finalists.

Also, please be sure to vote on Facebook:

Next: Best of Android 2019 Awards: The best phone of 2019 is…
 

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HoloFlex is prototype Android smartphone with a flexible display and glasses-free 3D


The world’s first holographic flexible smartphone has arrived. Researchers at the Human Media Lab at Queen’s University have created an Android device that can not only display objects three-dimensionally without the use of glasses or head tracking, but it also takes advantage of bendable screen technology to allow for depth input. The device, called the HoloFlex, is still clearly a prototype, but it’s a strong foreshadowing of the direction mobile tech might take in the future.

Royole super thin OLED displaySee also: The only thing stopping flexible displays from taking over is that no one is making them21

holoflex-2

“HoloFlex offers a completely new way of interacting with your smartphone,” said Dr. Roel Vertegaal, the director of the Human Media Laboratory. “It allows for glasses-free interactions with 3D video and images in a way that does not encumber the user.” Content displayed on the phone appears three dimensional when viewed from any angle by any number of viewers. The press release explains how this device works thusly:

HoloFlex features a 1920×1080 full high-definition Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) touchscreen display. Images are rendered into 12-pixel wide circular blocks rendering the full view of the 3D object from a particular viewpoint. These pixel blocks project through a 3D printed flexible microlens array consisting of over 16,000 fisheye lenses. The resulting 160 x 104 resolution image allows users to inspect a 3D object from any angle simply by rotating the phone.

The video showcasing the device’s capabilities includes a demonstration of the Z-axis bend input feature being used to move around parts of a 3D rendered model. Furthermore, a 3D version of Angry Birds shows how the bend capability can be used to pull back the slingshot, with haptic feedback simulating the tension in the slingshot’s strap. When the bird goes flying at the pig in a parabolic arc, the model appears to rise in the Z-axis above the surface of the phone in a parabolic arc.

holoflex AngryBirds

The HoloFlex will be officially unveiled at ACM CHI 2016 this coming Monday. Here’s hoping that someone snags some VR footage of this clever creation, because 2D video doesn’t quite do it justice. What do you think of the HoloFlex? Is this the direction smartphones are going to go, or are bendable screens and 3D just a passing novelty? Let us know your opinion in the comments below!

Next: Samsung doubles down on flexible OLED production in advance of new iPhones

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Revolutionary material could cut smartphone display energy consumption


bodle technologie zero power reflective display

Smartphone displays are one of the biggest drainers of our precious battery life but a new breakthrough invention being developed by Bodle Technologies could dramatically cut the amount of juice required by future displays in a wide range of gadgets. Rather than an LCD or OLED based displays, this new reflective display makes use of phase changing materials to reproduce vivid colors while consuming very little power.

The idea is based on the technology used in rewritable DVDs and works by using electronic pulses to change the color of the display’s materials. The material itself doesn’t consume any power, only requiring a brief charge to change its state and color, meaning that the energy needed to power a display in a smartphone or wearable could be cut quite substantially.

“You have to charge smartwatches every night, which is slowing adoption. But if you had a smartwatch or smart glass that didn’t need much power, you could recharge it just once a week.” – Dr Peiman Hosseini, founder of Bodle Technologies

Bodle Technologies is said to be in talks with a number of the world’s largest consumer electronics corporations, although none have been named for legal reasons. The company has also secured a “significant” amount of finance from the Oxford Sciences Innovation fund to boost further development.

“This technology is capable of providing vivid colour displays which appear similar to paper, yet with very high resolution. It is also capable of rendering extremely high-resolution videos that can be seen in bright sunlight.” – Dr Hosseini

As well as smartphones and wearables, this innovation is also thought to be useful for the emerging smart glass market, which is estimated to be worth approximately $ 2 billion by the year 2017. Such technology could be used to block infrared waves to help keep buildings cooler without the need for air-conditioning.

We are still quite a way off from the technology hitting any consumer level products, but it’s another promising innovation that could open up an entire new market for gadgets and beyond.

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Znaps adds a magnetic charging port to any smartphone


znaps-1

Apple may not be our favorite company here at Android Authority, but we gotta give it to them for coming up with the MagSafe charger; it’s about the most convenient and safe charging technology we have seen. In fact, we wonder why they haven’t applied a similar concept to their mobile devices. Regardless, someone has already beat them to the punch.

The Znaps was just introduced via Kickstarter this week, and it seems like a brilliant idea that should have come years ago. In essence, Znaps is an adapter that turns any microUSB or Lightning port into a magnetic charger. You simply plug it into your port and a small protrusion will show, but it’s so small it shouldn’t really affect you. Znaps claims you can even continue to use your cases without an issue.

The set-up can’t really be any easier. And you have no idea how convenient something like this would be. Just think about it. These are gadgets we carry every single day… and we charge them very often, too. Smartphones are prone to much more accidents than computers are, yet this MagSafe concept hasn’t been adopted by the mobile industry yet.

Interesting fact: the guys from Znaps managed to avoid a lawsuit from Apple by making an adapter for your current chargers. Making a cable would have violated Apple’s patent, and we know they are not fans of people copying them! By the way, it seems this system can do as much as the cable you are using. It supports Quick Charge 2.0, data transfers and all.

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I suppose something that also has me excited is that this will probably get rid of the hassle that comes with owning devices from multiple platforms. You could probably use a microUSB charger with an adapter to power up an iPhone with with a connector, for example. The same should apply the other way around.

As the Znaps team mentions on Kickstarter, your phone would be safe from sudden pulls. Charging will be super easy (you can even plug it in without looking). Oh, and there’s the added bonus of Znaps making your phone a bit more resistant to water dunks, as it stops water from going in through the microUSB port.

The best part is that Znaps is super affordable. You can get yourself an adapter and connector for only $ 9 USD, and they offer a calculator which you can use to make a custom order.

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There’s no plans to support USB-C just yet, but the team does claim they will work on it if this Kickstarter campaign does well… which it has. They have more than doubled their $ 120,000 funding goal in just a few days and still have 26 days to go.

I am in love with this thing and am pledging today. I seriously hate cables dangling around my living space. They are annoying and get damaged very easily. Not to mention the damage they can create if someone accidentally pulls them while in use! A recent Zagg study states about 48% of smartphone users live with damaged smartphones. Something like Znaps would probably help reduce that number.

Wireless charging is also great, but doesn’t offer the same charging speeds and data transfers are impossible with it. Sadly, we do still need them cables, so we should at least have better ones. Are you signing up? Hit the comments and let us know how you feel about this little accessory!

Visit the Znaps Kickstarter page to pledge

Android Authority

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