Tag Archive | "Samsung"

Samsung Galaxy S7 launch live blog and live stream – MWC 2016


While MWC 2016 doesn’t officially kick off until tomorrow, all the big guns are busy preparing for announcements today. LG already unveiled the LG G5, giving the G series a massive overhaul both in software and design. While we don’t expect quite as big of a change from Samsung, we’re still plenty excited to see what Samsung has in store for us with their upcoming Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge.

Thanks to a number of leaks, we know that the design won’t be changing a whole lot, but the rumor mill strongly suggests microSD and water resistance will be make their way back to the Galaxy S family after being dropped with the Galaxy S6’s debut last year. It’s certainly possible there could be at least a few other surprises up Samsung’s sleeves as well.

Android Authority will bring you hands-on coverage of the Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge as soon as we’re allowed to, so make sure to stick around for that. In the meantime, if you want to follow along with the event from home (or work?), we have your back. The Samsung launch event stream is embedded above, and we also have a realtime live blog with all the details as they unfold.

*Event kicks off at 1PM EST and 7PM CET*

Live Blog Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge launch event!
 

Keep it tuned to AA and feel free to give us a shout-out! And tell us what you think about the new LG G5!

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Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge 3600 mAh battery confirmed, thanks to FCC


Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus vs Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Quick look-12

While the Galaxy S6 family got a lot of things right for Samsung, there were at least a few small missteps too. First, there was the lack of microSD, and the lack of a removable battery. The GS6 family also removed waterproofing from the mix, and had relatively unimpressive battery life compared to many other phones of the time. With the Galaxy S7, Samsung is set to follow the same design philosophy as it did last year while also addressing some of these shortcomings.

The rumor mill already has suggested that microSD, waterproofing, and bigger batteries are all par for the course with the new Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge. Now thanks to a FCC filing for the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge, we can confirm that small battery size is one issue that the GS7 family won’t have to contend with.

fcc-galaxy-s7-edge

The rumors already pointed to a 3000 mAh and a 5.1-inch display for the Galaxy S7, with a 3600 mAh battery and 5.5-inch display for the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge. Now an FCC label document confirms the 3600 mAh size, though no similar documentation exists for the Galaxy S7 as far as we can tell. That said, it’s probably a safe bet that if the 3600 mAh rumor was right, so is the 3000 mAh claim for the standard Galaxy S7.

samsung galaxy s7 s7 edgeSee also: Samsung Galaxy S7 rumor roundup: release date, price, specs, features71

The big question now is if a 3600 mAh battery means that the Galaxy S7 Edge will have monster battery life, or if the power demands from its hardware are so great that this is merely a means of keeping up. For what it’s worth, the Nexus 6P has one of the best battery lives out there (the Mate 8 beats it easily, though) in the Android world and manages to get about a day and half battery life for the typical user. Considering the Snapdragon 820 and Exynos 8890 are supposedly optimized to further improve battery life, we’d expect similar, if not better, battery performance here. Of course, it’s really too early to say for sure.

What do you think, excited by the Galaxy S7 Edge? Disappointed by the jump in screen size, or do you think it will prove to be a wise move?

Android Authority

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Samsung Galaxy Note 5 vs LG V10


Buy the Galaxy Note 5 now
Buy the LG V10 now

Last year, LG announced its brand new V series of smartphones in their latest attempt to capture the premium smartphone market. The first of the series was dubbed the LG V10, and the new flagship gave LG fans a great alternative to the LG G4, complete with a more durable design and it also introduced special features like a fingerprint scanner. The LG V10 has found a modest level of success, but it’s certainly not without competition in the big-screen/premium space.

The most obvious competitor is the Samsung Galaxy Note 5, which saw a major upgrade in 2015, giving users a more premium design and build quality, though these changes weren’t without some sacrifice. Samsung removed several staple features as a result of the new design, while improving other core features, such as the S-Pen.

Both smartphones are some of the best currently available, but which is the best choice for you? We find out, in this comprehensive look at the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 vs LG V10!

Design

Note5_vs_LGV10_9

With both smartphones featuring very contrasting designs and build qualities, the choice between the two will be made for a lot of consumers right off the bat based on this aspect. While the Samsung flagship features a dramatic departure from its predecessors, with a larger focus on looks and build quality, LG continues to prioritize functionality, even though the V10 isn’t particularly unattractive either.

As mentioned, the Galaxy Note 5 is very different from previous generations of the series, and like the Galaxy S6, now features a premium metal and glass unibody construction. This is a beautifully-designed smartphone with a premium build quality that matches its high-end nature, and is definitely one of the biggest selling points of this device. However, the new design did result in a couple of previously staple features, namely expandable storage and a removable battery, going by the wayside.

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The glass backing has a curve to it along the sides that lets this large smartphone nestle nicely in the palm of your hand, and with its ultra-thin bezels and small top and bottom areas, the handling experience available with the Galaxy Note 5 is certainly more manageable than what is expected from a device featuring a 5.7-inch display. The glass does make the device quite slippery though, and it is also a fingerprint magnet.

On the other hand, the LG V10 sees a design and build quality based on functionality. The device features a metal frame and a backing made of what LG calls “DuraSkin,” and the material not only looks and feels nice, but allows for a lot of grip, which means you don’t have to worry about the phone slipping out of your hands. The back cover of the V10 is also removable, giving you access to the user replaceable battery and microSD card slot, making LG one of the few OEMs to still offer these features.

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With its removable back cover and secondary screen above the main display, the LG V10 is taller, thicker, and heavier than the Samsung Galaxy Note 5, but LG has still managed to keep the device as compact as possible, courtesy of its ultra-thin bezels. The handling experience of the Galaxy Note 5 may be better in terms of size, but the LG flagship sees its advantages when it comes to grip. Further, the V10 is MIL-STD-810G certified for shock resistance, and is definitely the more durable of the two smartphones.

Design is one aspect that is entirely dependent on personal preference, but we have to admit that the Galaxy Note 5 is the sleeker and more elegant of the two. That said, the industrial design and build quality of the LG V10 does make for a far more durable smartphone, and ultimately it is your choice as to what aspect is more important to you.

Display

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Both smartphones feature 5.7-inch displays with a Quad HD resolution, resulting in similar pixel densities. That said, these displays have their differences because of the differing underlying technologies, with Samsung continuing to bank on Super AMOLED, while the V10 features a IPS LCD panel.

Note5_vs_LGV10_20

As is expected from Super AMOLED, the display of the Galaxy Note 5 features deep blacks, vibrant, vivid, and saturated colors, and plenty of brightness for comfortable viewing in broad daylight. However, you do have the option to tone down the saturation as well, depending on your personal taste. The display of the LG V10 isn’t bad either though, and really outperforms most other LCD panels out there. However, when pitting the two displays against each other, the more saturated look of the Galaxy Note 5 may be what most users prefer.

Both displays make for a very pleasant viewing experience, but it is worth noting that the Galaxy Note 5 takes better advantage of it’s screen size by decreasing the DPI to 560, to fit more onto the screen. You will notice that icons and words appear larger on the V10 thanks to it’s DPI set at 640, which is a little unfortunate, as things appear to unnecessarily take up much more room on the screen.

Note5_vs_LGV10_18

Of course, the big news on the display front is the secondary screen that the LG V10 packs, found on top of the primary display, and takes up about 70% of the width of the main screen, with the dual front-facing cameras occupying the rest of the space. This secondary display is a great way for showing notifications without taking away from the main display, and you can also set up app shortcuts for quick and easy access to them. This display also stays on throughout, which means you don’t have to keep turning on the main screen to check your notifications.

Once you get into the habit of using this secondary screen, it can certainly help improve your workflow. That said, while it is an interesting idea, its functionality may not be enough to justify the extra space that it takes up.

Performance

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Under the hood, the LG V10 comes with an octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 processor, clocked at 1.82 GHz, and backed by the Adreno 418 GPU and 4 gigabytes of RAM. In contrast, the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 comes with an in-house octa-core Exynos 7420 processor, clocked at 2.1 GHz, and backed by the Mali-T760MP8 GPU, though it also has 4 GB of RAM.

Given the various multi-tasking capabilities both smartphones feature, the overall experience with both is as smooth and snappy as expected, even though the LG V10 does seem to do a better job with RAM management when compared to the Galaxy Note 5. However, the Galaxy Note 5 does provide better performance in terms of load times and frame rates as far as gaming is concerned, but the LG V10 isn’t that far behind.

lg v10See also: LG V10 durability drop test28

Hardware

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32 GB and 64 GB are the available storage options with the Samsung Galaxy Note 5, but with the lack of expandable storage, users will have to depend on the higher storage iteration to cover their needs. On the other hand, 64 GB is the only option available with the LG V10, and while that should be more than enough for most, you do also get expandable storage via microSD card by up to 200 GB.

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Both smartphones feature fingerprint scanners in the touch-type implementation, integrated into the home button up front in the case of the Galaxy Note 5, and in the power button on the back of the LG V10. The different placements have their advantages and disadvantages, and while the Galaxy Note 5 can be unlocked when the device is on a table, the scanner is awkward to reach when holding the phone, in which instance, the position of the reader on the LG V10 is ideal. Both are as fast and reliable as expected, and work equally well.

Note5_vs_LGV10_8

Both phones comes with single bottom-mounted speakers, and while neither offer fantastic sound quality, the speaker of the LG V10 does get louder, and offers better highs without sounding as tinny as the speaker of the Galaxy Note 5, making for a clearer and brighter sound. When plugging in headphones, the LG V10 is the clear winner, with its support for 32-bit Hi-Fi DAC audio from ESS technology.

Note5_vs_LGV10_5

Of course, the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 does pack some extras in terms of hardware, including the heart rate monitor on the back, and the S-Pen, nestled neatly away into the bottom the right corner. The re-designed S-Pen comes with even more software capabilities this time around, such as Screen-off memo, which is an incredibly useful feature, allowing for a quick and easy way to jot down something on the fly. Other features found when the screen is on include Smart Select, that lets cut out and share any portion of the screen, and Screen Write, which takes screenshots of the current page entirely, for editing, which means scrollable pages on websites are pieced together automatically, resulting in one long image or note.

 

Both smartphones come with 3,000 mAh batteries, but the Galaxy Note 5 does seem to provide slightly better battery life. It is relatively easy to get a full day of use out of both devices, with the Galaxy Note 5 allowing for up to 4.5 hours of screen-on time, with the LG V10 falling short at around 4 hours. Both smartphones feature fast charging capabilities, so you will be up and running quickly if you are worried about running out of battery. While the Galaxy Note 5 also comes with fast wireless charging, the LG V10 sees its advantage in the fact that the battery is removable, giving users the option to carry around a spare.

Camera

Note5_vs_LGV10_2

Both smartphones retain the cameras from their early 2015 flagship counterparts, with the Galaxy Note 5 coming with a 16 MP rear shooter with a f/1.9 aperture and OIS, while the LG V10 also features a 16 MP rear camera, with a f/1.8 aperture and OIS, along with the additional benefit of a laser-guided auto focus system, that does allow for the V10 camera to focus faster.

Both cameras perform exceptionally well when it comes to outdoor shots, with little difference between the two. The Galaxy Note 5 adds a bit more contrast and color to the images, which does come down to personal preference, but that extra boost from the post processing is quite appealing. However, this does mean that you will lose a lot of information in the darker areas of the photos. Colors are more towards the warmer side as well, while the V10 is a little cooler with less saturated colors, often capturing a more accurate representation of the scene. That doesn’t mean this camera is necessarily better or worse than the Galaxy Note 5, and it all depends on how you’re going to be using these photos.

Note5_vs_LGV10_12

If you want to quickly snap a beautiful photo without having to tinker with any settings, you’re going to love the vibrant colors, higher contrast, and sharper images on the Galaxy Note 5. However, if you want a more accurate and realistic photo with lots of room for editing, the V10 is going to be your best bet. Both do have manual controls as well, although the V10 has some more flexibility especially when it comes to focus. In low light conditions, the LG V10 is the clear winner, with V10 creating a crisper image with more detail, compared to the almost airbrushed look shots in low light have with the Galaxy Note 5.

Note5_vs_LGV10_14

In video mode, both cameras take some decent shots, even in 4K, and with OIS, your videos will be a lot smoother than usual, with the Note 5 having a bit more shake. The V10 decides it wants to focus more often than the Galaxy Note 5 though, but when it does, it does it a lot faster with its laser autofocus. However, the V10’s video recording capabilities is in a totally different league than the Note 5 with it’s full manual controls. It’s very similar to the controls in manual photo mode, except with a few new additions, including a stereo sound level to view audio and an audio controller where you can tell the V10 if the audio is coming from behind or in front of the phone, to help with some noise cancellation. We can also control how loud the sound is recorded and there is also a Wind Noise Filter.

Samsung Galaxy Note 5 camera samples

The front facing cameras on these devices are great in their own ways. The Galaxy Note 5 has a single wide angle lens that helps with getting everything in the shot, while the V10 has two selfie cams, a wide angled lens, and another that is able to get a closer shot. However, most users would be fine with just one wide angled front facing camera on the V10, while never really using the more standard lens.

LG V10 camera samples

Both cameras are a close match but with the V10 does offer better video quality, video features, a better front facing camera, and more realistic photos that photographers will love. However, the Galaxy Note 5 isn’t far behind at all, and overall, users will be happy with the camera experience regardless of which phone they pick.

Software

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Both the LG V10 and Galaxy Note 5 are running Android 5.1.1 Lollipop, with the latest versions of G UI and TouchWiz respectively. Visually, they appear to be very similar with simplified notification pull downs and quick shortcuts that you can customize. Their settings menus are are grouped into four sections depending on which carrier you have. Some people may not be too fond of how these skins look, and I do prefer the more neutral colors of LG’s skin over Samsung’s bright blue and green colors that can appear a little out of place sometimes.

Galaxy Note 5 screenshots

LG V10 screenshots

The main concern here is how each phone holds up when doing everyday tasks and some more heavy usage. Both are capable of dual-window support which is great, given the big 5.7-inch displays found here. Both phones deliver unique and for the most part, good software experiences, but I’ll lean a little more towards the V10, as it seemed the most reliable in my weeks of testing.

Specs comparison

  Samsung Galaxy Note 5 LG V10
Display 5.7-inch Super AMOLED display
Quad HD resolution, 518 ppi
Main: 5.7-inch IPS Quantum Display with 2560 x 1440 resolution, 515 ppi
Secondary: 2.1-inch IPS Quantum Display with 160 x 1040 resolution, 515 ppi
Processor 2.1 GHz octa-core Exynos 7420
Mali-T760MP8 GPU
1.82 GHz hexa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808
Adreno 418 GPU
RAM 4 GB 4 GB
Storage 32/64 GB
not expandable
64 GB
expandable via microSD card by up to 200 GB
Camera 16 MP rear camera with OIS
5 MP front-facing camera
16 MP rear camera with OIS
5 MP dual front-facing cameras
Battery 3,000 mAh 3,000 mAh
Software Android 5.1.1 Lollipop Android 5.1.1 Lollipop
Dimensions 153.2 x 76.1 x 7.6 mm
171 grams
159.6 x 79.3 x 8.6 mm
192 grams

Gallery

Final thoughts

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So there you have it for this in-depth look at the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 vs LG V10! As mentioned, for most users, the choice between the two will be easy, based primarily on design and build quality. The Galaxy Note 5 features the sleeker and more elegant design, the arguably better display, and those looking for productivity will love the S-Pen and all its capabilities. On the flip side, if durability is a concern, the LG V10 is the device for you, and features like expandable storage and a removable battery are big positives as well.

nexus 6p vs samsung galaxy note 5 aa (26 of 26)See also: Best Android phones (January 2016)424

Buy the Galaxy Note 5 now
Buy the LG V10 now

Android Authority

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Apple demanding $180M extra cash in settlement from Samsung


samsung-logo-x-x-mwc-2015 (1)

In America, trials are rarely cut-and-dry events: even after a decision is reached the losing party can often demand a retrial, and the escalation process then begins, possibly even reaching the U.S. Supreme Court. In Apple v. Samsung, a rather unusual turn of events has just taken place. Despite Samsung having finally agreed to pay the (reduced) damages it owed Apple, the latter company is now demanding even more money. How much? $ 180,000,000 to be exact.

Those who have followed the trial since it began in 2011 may recall that Apple sued Samsung for allegedly making illegal use of patents and designs related to the iPhone. The trial originally ended with a verdict favorable to Apple and requiring Samsung to pay $ 1.04 billion in damages. Years later the total stood at a reduced $ 548 million, which Samsung paid on December 14th. In doing so however, Samsung also stipulated that if the ongoing disputes related to that first trial ultimately end in the Korean OEM’s favor, Apple must give back the money. Apple, in turn, argued no such reimbursement would take place.

The new damages, filed on Wednesday, argue that Samsung must pay around $ 180 million “in supplemental damages and interests…These further damages relate to five Samsung devices that infringed Apple’s patents and were sold after a 2012 jury verdict finding Samsung liable in the dispute” according to Reuters.

While a new trial will begin next year related to the damages from this original trial, Samsung meanwhile has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the case, arguing that Apple’s compensation was far too much given the patents involved. Before a hearing can be scheduled, the Supreme Court Justices would first need to agree to review the case, something it could just as easily refuse.

Suddenly, Samsung?

Some have questioned what made Samsung “suddenly” decide to pay off the existing damages to begin with, especially given the company’s demand for potential reimbursement. While it is impossible to say what was ultimately decided upon, several theories are possible:

  1. Samsung’s executives became concerned with the liability-factor relating to the outstanding figure. The company has made a number of bold statements in recent weeks that underscore the difficult times currently facing the OEM. Having the Apple settlement effectively “off” the balance sheet would allow it to be taken as a loss now while the company is still in relatively good fiscal condition, rather than in the future when it might be facing a more difficult situation.
  2. Samsung could have used it as bargaining leverage with Apple. It is widely known that the South Korean OEM supplies numerous components for Apple’s products, and it has even been suggested that Apple may seek to purchase AMOLED panels from Samsung in the future for use with iPhone models. Samsung’s payment could be seen as a sign of good will, or even a way of trying to gain an upper-hand as if to say “we have fulfilled our requirement, so now we expect you to take us seriously.”
  3. Apple may have required Samsung to pay the damages before any deal regarding AMOLED production (or other new technology) could be considered. Given that LG also produces AMOLED panels, it is conceivable that Apple might have used the outstanding payout as “encouraging” board members and executives to lean towards LG for the new components.
  4. Samsung’s legal team may have suggested that a Supreme Court hearing is unlikely to happen and that it is better to just pay the damages now as opposed to further prolonging it.
  5. Samsung may be under the impression that Apple will indeed return the money should the patents related to the trial ultimately be invalidated.

It is possible one of these points has hit the nail on the head. It is also possible that the true nature may be a combination of many, or perhaps none of them at all. The politics and business decisions behind major movements like this are the stuff of speculative legend, though it is likely no one but those directly involved will ever know what happened.

apple 3d touch 2

At the very least, the fact that Apple is asking for even more money now stands as a rather contentious issue in and of itself: on the one hand the company seemingly has a legitimate reason to demanding damages related to such a protracted payout (the interest alone is worth a fortune) and inevitably Apple’s own stakeholders have been most displeased with the missing money not exchanging “hands”.

At the same time, for Samsung, this new filing inevitably comes across as a slap in the face. After finally paying the restitution, the company is now hit with additional fees serving to ensure the “you owe me” situation perpetuates for some time to come.

Wrap Up

While some have referred to the ongoing legal battle as the “The Patent Trial of the Century“, the title seemingly becomes more and more apropos given the continuing and prolonging twists and turns in the matter. Clearly Apple is not happy even after it has received it’s money, yet perhaps it shouldn’t be given how much time has taken to facilitate such. Samsung, meanwhile, wants Apple’s patents invalidated so as to absolve it of any legal problems.

We want to hear what you think. Is Apple in the right here? Should it have filed new charges? Please leave your comments below and let us know!

Android Authority

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Moto X Style (Pure Edition) vs Samsung Galaxy S6


When the Samsung Galaxy S6 debuted earlier this year, the Korean manufacturer surprised the world by introducing a major overhaul to the build quality and design of its flagship, which better matched the premium price the series commanded. While this was a much-needed change, it did result in some previously signature features going by the wayside.

On the other hand, the latest high-end offering from Motorola retained a lot of what made its predecessor so good, and it remains mostly familiar, save for the bump in size, slightly more refined design elements, and necessary upgrades to key hardware aspects.

How does Motorola’s inexpensive flagship fair against what is arguably the best Galaxy S smartphone that Samsung has ever produced? We find out, in this in-depth look at the Moto X Style (Pure Edition) vs Samsung Galaxy S6!

Design

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-8

In terms of design, the first thing you will notice with these two smartphones is how different they are when it comes to the overall aesthetics.

As mentioned, the Moto X Pure Edition retains a lot of the design language of its predecessor, apart from the significant bump in size, including a metal frame, and the curved corners and back that allows for the device to nestle nicely in the palm of your hand. Given its larger footprint, the handling experience isn’t the most comfortable, but the ultra-thin bezels around the sides of the display and small top and bottom chin make for a device that is a lot more manageable that what its 5.7-inch display might suggest. The standard rubbery silicone backing provides a lot of grip as well, but if that is not very important, there are plenty of other options available to you via Moto Maker.

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-13

Like the other Moto X family members before it, one of the biggest selling points of the current Motorola flagship is the level of customization available to you. Moto Maker allows you to pick and choose your own color scheme, accent colors, and material for the back cover, and you also have the ability to add custom engravings and messages on the back, for that little bit more of a personalized touch. This kind of personalization is unmatched by any other OEM, and is a very unique aspect of the Moto X experience.

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-15

On the other hand, the Samsung Galaxy S6 may have only a handful of color options to choose from, but the big story with the latest Galaxy S flagship was Samsung’s decision to be done with plastic, in favor of a glass and metal unibody construction. With a lot of familiar elements, it does look like a Samsung smartphone through and through, but it looks and feels far more high-end, as is expected from a flagship device of this caliber.

The glass on the back can be a fingerprint magnet, and does make the phone somewhat slippery as well, but given its more compact size, one-handed use is still very comfortable with the Galaxy S6.

Display

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-7

The Moto X Pure Edition comes with a 5.7-inch IPS LCD display, while the Samsung Galaxy S6 features a 5.1-inch Super AMOLED screen. With the resolution of both displays being 2560 x 1440, sharpness is of no concern with either. The Galaxy S6 does come with a higher pixel density of 577 ppi compared to the 520 ppi of the Moto X Pure Edition, but that is a difference that is going to hardly be noticeable. What is notable however is the distinction caused by the different underlying technologies of these two displays.

Samsung is well known for its display prowess, and once again, the Super AMOLED display of the Galaxy S6 offers the vibrant, saturated colors and high contrast that we’ve come to expect. The inky dark blacks are not only great for battery life, but also look much cleaner when compared to the grayish blacks on the LCD display of the Motorola smartphone.

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-1

That’s not to say that the display of the Moto X Pure Edition is disappointing in any way. It is a great looking screen with surprisingly great colors, viewing angles, and brightness, and while the use of AMOLED might have made more sense given some of the software features available with the Moto X, the switch to LCD is certainly not a deal breaker. Gaming and media-consumption is also very enjoyable with the Moto X Pure Edition, with users able to take advantage of the additional display real estate this is available to them.

Performance

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-3

Under the hood, the Moto X Pure Edition features a hexa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 processor, clocked at 1.8 GHz, and backed by the Adreno 418 GPU, while the Samsung Galaxy S6 comes with an octa-core Exynos 7420 processor, clocked at 2.1 GHz, and backed by the Mali-T760MP8 GPU. While both devices offer 3 GB of RAM, you are dealing with the much faster DDR4 RAM with the Galaxy S6, compared to DDR3 on the Motorola device.

The Moto X Pure Edition may not be winning any specs races, but Motorola’s focus with their devices has always been on providing a great user experience, and that, fortunately, continues to hold true with their latest offering. Courtesy of a near-stock software iteration, the Moto X Pure Edition is fast, fluid, responsive, and rarely skips a beat. Swiping, scrolling, opening applications, multi-tasking, and gaming are all handled extremely well, and ultimately, that is what is going to matter the most.

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-16

On the other hand, Samsung flagships have always come with whatever was deemed the latest and greatest at the time, but unfortunately, real world performance has historically never lived up to expectations. This time around, Samsung decided to give the Snapdragons of the world a skip in favor of their in-house processing package, and that has proved to be a fantastic move.

The Galaxy S6 performs the way a flagship should, with a lot of credit going to Samsung’s optimization of their Touchwiz software suite, that comes with a lot less bloatware and unnecessary features than we’ve seen from Samsung in the past. The Galaxy S6 is easily the smoothest performing Samsung flagship that has ever been released, and while it still has its flaws, like the aggressive RAM management, it is still leaps and bounds ahead of what we’ve seen from the company over the years.

Hardware

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-13

In storage, the Moto X Pure Edition is available with 16 GB, 32 GB, and 64 GB of storage, while the Samsung Galaxy S6 comes with 32 GB, 64 GB, and 128 GB variants. The higher storage options may be the better way to go with the Galaxy S6, given the lack of expandable storage, a previous staple feature that Samsung decided to remove this time around. The story is the opposite with the Motorola flagship however, with the Moto X Pure Edition featuring expandable storage via microSD card, something that wasn’t available with its predecessors. This means that you will be able to alleviate any storage concerns, even if you opt for the base 16 GB model.

Another advantage the Moto X Pure Edition has over the Samsung Galaxy S6 is in terms of speaker quality. The former comes with a dual front-facing speaker setup which sounds fantastic, and provides a far better audio experience for gaming and watching videos when compared to the single, bottom-mounted speaker of the latter. The speaker of the Galaxy S6 is not bad by any means and can actually get quite loud, but it does pale in comparison to the Moto X Pure Edition.

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-10

The Galaxy S6 does feature a few extras in hardware that aren’t available with the Moto X Pure Edition, starting with the fingerprint scanner. If you appreciate the added benefit and security of having a fingerprint reader, then the reader on the Galaxy S6 is certainly not going to disappoint. The reader is fast, reliable, and easy to set up, and its touch type nature is a far better implementation that the swipe gesture version seen with some of Samsung’s earlier flagships. Apart from unlocking the device, the fingerprint scanner is also compatible for use with Samsung Pay and Android Pay, for that layer of extra security when using these mobile payment systems. The Galaxy S6 also comes with a heart rate monitor on the back, which is a useful addition for some.

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-12

On the battery front, the Moto X Pure Edition comes with a 3,000 mAh battery, larger than the 2,550 mAh unit of the Samsung Galaxy S6. Neither battery is replaceable, and while that is standard for the Moto X device, it is a significant departure from the norm for the Samsung flagship. The battery life is better with the Moto X Pure Edition, but not significantly so.

Both devices come with fast charging capabilities as well, making it extremely easy to get both phones up and running in a short time. The Samsung Galaxy S6 also comes with support for both standards of wireless charging, which is always a nice option to have.

Camera

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-11

The Moto X Pure Edition comes with a 21 MP rear camera, with phase detection auto focus and a f/2.0 aperture, while the Galaxy S6 features a 16 MP camera, with a f/1.9 aperture, and optical image stabilization.

Moto X Pure Edition camera samples

The Moto X series has never really been known for its camera capabilities, but the Moto X Pure Edition features some significant improvements this time around, resulting in a camera experience that can finally match up to the rest of the competition. Both smartphones are capable of taking excellent photos in most lighting situations, but the edge has to be given to the Galaxy S6 here, for its better dynamic range and low-light performance.

Samsung Galaxy S6 camera samples

Where the Moto X Pure Edition falls short is with regards to the camera application. It is far too minimalistic, especially when compared to what is available with the Galaxy S6. The GS6 camera app comes with a few more options and manual controls that really help make a difference. Futhermore, tapping on the viewfinder to take a shot on the Motorola device just doesn’t feel as intuitive as having a dedicated shutter button.

Software

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-5

On the software side of things, both smartphones are running Android 5.1.1 Lollipop, but the experience each offers is completely different from the other. With the Moto X Pure Edition, you get a near stock Android iteration with some useful features from Motorola baked in, such as twisting your wrist to open the camera, chopping twice to turn on the LED flash, glancing at notifications with Moto Display, or discreetly performing voice commands, just to name a few.

The Galaxy S6 on the other hand, comes with Samsung’s typical Touchwiz interface, and while it is a significant departure from stock Android, it is a much cleaner and toned down build of Touchwiz this time around. There is a lot less bloatware, and Samsung also got rid of a lot of unnecessary features. Those that were useful are retained however, such as multi-window, and motion gestures, like swiping your palm over the screen to capture a screen shot, or flipping the phone over to mute a call. Things may not aesthetically be very different from previous iterations of Touchwiz, but if you aren’t a fan of the look, you can now easily change it via the built-in theme store. The theme store is extremely robust, with a lot of options to choose from, and is probably one of the best features of this new version of Touchwiz.

If getting timely updates is of concern, the safer bet would be on the Moto X Pure Edition to get the official update to Android 6.0 Marshmallow first, but hopefully, we won’t be waiting too long for either of these devices to get updated.

Specs comparison

  Samsung Galaxy S6 Moto X Style (Pure Edition)
Display 5.1-inch Super AMOLED display
Quad HD resolution, 577 ppi
5.7-inch IPS LCD display
Quad HD resolution, 515 ppi
Processor 2.1 GHz octa-core Exynos 7420 processor
Mali-T760MP8 GPU
1.8 GHz hexa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 processor
Adreno 418 GPU
RAM 3 GB 3 GB
Storage 32/64/128 GB 16/32/64 GB
expandable via microSD up to 128 GB
Camera 16 MP rear camera with LED flash, OIS
5 MP front-facing camera
21 MP rear camera with dual LED flash
5 MP front-facing camera with wide angle lens and front-facing flash
Connectivity Wi-Fi a/b/g/n/ac
Bluetooth 4.1
NFC
GPS+GLONASS
Wi-Fi a/b/g/n/ac
Universal LTE bands
Bluetooth 4.1
NFC
GPS+GLONASS
Battery 2,550 mAh 3,000 mAh
Software Android 5.1.1 Lollipop Android 5.1.1 Lollipop
Dimensions 143.4 x 70.5 x 6.8 mm
128 grams
153.9 x 76.2 x 11.1 mm
179 grams
Colors White Pearl, Black Sapphire, Gold Platinum, Blue Topaz Moto Maker
Coated Silicon Rubber
Horween leather and natural wood
Metallic accents
Engraving

Gallery

Conclusion

So there you have it for this in-depth look at the Moto X Style (Pure Edition) vs Samsung Galaxy S6! When picking up any new smartphone, price always has an important role to play, and we’ve seen a big surge in devices that continue to offer great specifications and features at affordable price points. Considering that the Moto X Pure Edition features a large Quad HD display, great front-facing speakers, a pretty decent camera, and a lot of customization via Moto Maker, its $ 400 starting price makes it one of the best bang for your buck devices of 2015.

Moto X Pure Edition VS Samsung Galaxy S6-18

The Galaxy S6 is clearly the more expensive of the two, by a big margin, but it offers a few useful like extras, like a fingerprint scanner, wireless charging, and more powerful specifications. It is up to you as to whether these features are worth the extra cost, and if they are, then the Galaxy S6 will certainly not disappoint. However, if you are looking for a smartphone that provides a lot of value for not a lot of money, look no further than the Moto X Pure Edition.

Get the Galaxy S6 on Amazon
Get the Moto X Pure on Amazon

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Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 said to be 50% stronger than the Samsung Exynos 7420


Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 AA

We know it’s unfair to compare the Samsung Exynos 7420 to a next generation high-end processor, but in this case Sammy’s chipset is serving as a benchmark that will help us get an idea of just how good the Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 SoC will be. That is, assuming the latest report is to be believed.

Analyst Pan Jiutang has published insider knowledge coming from an “upstream friend” who claims the Snapdragon 820 is going to be a massive upgrade compared to current generation flagship processors. The source claims there are insane differences between the Snapdragon 820 and the Exynos 7420, which is the CPU you will find in most Samsung high-end smartphones right now, including the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy Note 5.

Exynos 7 Octa

It turns out the Snapdragon 820 will be 50% more powerful than the Exynos 7420, a chip that is already known for its ample processing power (#1 in our Best Android phones post has this CPU). Furthermore, it is said even single-threading tests produce the same outcome.

qualcomm-snapdragon-820-leakGiven, these are processors from different generations, but a 50% increase doesn’t fail to impress, especially considering most upgrades tend to be gradual. It also leaves us wondering why the already powerful Snapdragon 810 would need such a huge upgrade. Especially considering people were left worried about possible overheating issues. Will that much more power warrant an equal amount of added heat? Let’s hope not!

We must also keep in mind that recent rumors say the Samsung Galaxy S7 is to feature a Snapdragon 820 processor in the USA and China. The reason is still unknown, but such happening would suggest Samsung has a basis for opting for the Snapdragon 820, as opposed to its own chips.

qualcomm

So far we know the Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 will feature the new Adreno 530 GPU, a Hexagon 680 DSP, an improved Kryo CPU and improved  LTE/WiFi connectivity. More details will probably come as we near a release, but the real competition wills start once we start hearing more about Samsung’s upcoming processors. Until then, all we can do is look at our newest Galaxy handsets and wonder what it would be like to have 50% more power added to them.

Do you even need that much performance?

Also read: 

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Samsung Galaxy Note 5 possibly heading to India


Samsung Galaxy Note 5 Unboxing-11

Samsung seemed to have upset a few of its customers when it announced that the Galaxy Note 5 wouldn’t be launching in every region right away, but Indian consumers may be a little luckier. SamMobile has come across some test firmware for an Indian version of the handset with a build date created recently in August.

The build, version number N920GDDU1AOH2 (where H is apparently for August), is said to still be a work in progress for the Galaxy Note 5. However, the fact that development is still ongoing is a promising sign that Samsung may be planning to launch the device in India sometime soon. The country was not mentioned on the official list of launch regions, and Samsung decline to confirm or deny the rumor, so make of this what you will.

A similar work in progress build has previously been spotted for Europe, but it was last updated back in June, suggesting that development has been paused, at least for now. This certainly doesn’t mean that a European launch won’t happen at some point, but it likely won’t take place before any Indian launch.

Galaxy Note 5 videos:

Although Samsung’s decision not to globally launch the Note 5 may be infuriating for some potential customers, Samsung apparently misjudged and struggled to meet demand for its smaller S6 Edge display earlier in the year. Perhaps this is Samsung’s way of keeping tighter control over its display supply this time around?

Do you think that the Galaxy Note 5 would go down well in India?

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Check out the official announcement videos for the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 and Galaxy S6 Edge Plus


Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus Hands On-36

Samsung has just taken the wraps off the new Galaxy Note 5 and Galaxy S6 Edge Plus at its Unpacked event just hours ago. Both devices feature big 5.7-inch Super AMOLED Quad HD displays, a mostly-glass design and many other notable enhancements that will likely be welcomed by consumers.

Samsung has just published the official introduction videos for both handsets, showing off some of their unique features. The first intro video walks through the Note 5’s new and improved S Pen and note taking features, curved back plate for a more comfortable in-hand feel, and some of the new multitasking software features. The second introduction video gives us a good look at the S6 Edge Plus’ new features that take advantage of the larger edge display.

Samsung Galaxy Note 5

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+

Want to learn more about these two new smartphones? We’ve got you covered! Head to the links below to get a closer look, and be sure to tell us what you think about the handsets in the comments below.

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Samsung to release monthly security updates to its Android devices in wake of Stagefright exploit


Samsung-Galaxy-S6-Edge-31

A number of mobile devices on AT&T and Sprint have already begun receiving security patches for the Stagefright exploit in Android. Most of the devices that are already receiving updates are from Samsung, and that’s not a coincidence. The Korean tech company has just announced a new Android security update process that “fast tracks” security patches over the air when certain vulnerabilities are uncovered. These small updates will make their way to Samsung devices roughly once per month.

Prior to introducing this new update method, Samsung, like many other OEMs, would likely struggle to push out security patches in a timely fashion. Many security exploits are very time sensitive, so this is great news for owners of Samsung devices.

Security conceptSee also: Google on ‘Stagefright” exploit: not all Android bugs are this bad, thanks to Google’s security measures13417

Dong Jin Koh, Executive Vice President and Head of Mobile Research at Samsung Electronics explains:

Since software is constantly exploited in new ways, developing a fast response process to deliver security patches to our devices is critical to keep them protected. We believe that this new process will vastly improve the security of our devices and will aim to provide the best mobile experience possible for our users.

Google also recently announced a new initiative that will bring monthly security OTA updates to Nexus devices, in addition to regular platform updates. The updates from Google will also be available through AOSP.

Samsung says it’s working with carriers around the world to figure out a way to best implement this new update approach, and that more details on the new method will be released soon.

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Mid-range smackdown: Oppo R7, Samsung A7, Asus ZenFone 2, and Sony Xperia M4 Aqua


oppo-r7-review-aa-1-of-21

OPPO R7, the company’s mid-range champion.

Not too long ago, it was surprisingly difficult to find an unlocked, capable smartphone for an affordable price point. To get a mobile device that worked properly, it wasn’t uncommon that users would need to spend anywhere around $ 500-$ 800. Luckily for everyone, a number of device manufacturers have been releasing smartphones that are capable of handling everyday tasks, but still won’t break the bank.

Specifically, lesser known but rapidly growing smartphone companies such as OPPO and Asus have been releasing some great devices, and so have well-known manufacturers like Samsung and Sony. But how do the most prominent mid-tier smartphones from these companies compare? While this is not a complete list by any means, we decided to pit just a few mid-range handsets against one another to see how they fare.

Specifications

Today we’ll be comparing the OPPO R7, Samsung Galaxy A7, ASUS ZenFone 2, and the Sony Xperia M4 Aqua. It should be noted early on that we haven’t reviewed the Galaxy A7, though given its comparable specifications to the competition, we thought it to be a good device to add to the comparison. Although these smartphones bring somewhat similar specifications and price points to the table, many of them still differ from one another when it comes to overall user experience. Before we get too far into the details, let’s take a look at the specification list below:

  OPPO R7 Samsung Galaxy A7 (A700FD) Sony Xperia M4 Aqua ASUS ZenFone 2
Display 5.0-inch Super AMOLED display with 1080 x 1920 resolution 5.5-inch Super AMOLED display with 1080 x 1920 resolution 5.0-inch IPS LCD display with 720 x 1280 resolution 5.5-inch IPS LCD display with 1080 x 1920 resolution
Processor 1.5 GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 615 Quad-core 1.5 GHz Cortex-A53 & quad-core 1.0 GHz Cortex-A53 Qualcomm Snapdragon 615 1.5 GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 615 2.3GHz quad-core Intel Atom Z3580 (4GB RAM),
1.8GHz quad-core Intel Atom Z3560 (2GB RAM)
RAM 3GB 2GB 2GB 2/4GB
Storage 16GB, expandable up to 128GB 16GB, expandable up to 64GB 8/16GB, expandable up to 128GB 16/32/64GB, expandable up to 64GB
GPU Adreno 305 Adreno 405 Adreno 405 PowerVR G6430
Camera 13MP rear f/2.2
8MP front-facing f/2.4
13MP rear camera
5MP front camera
13 MP rear camera
5MP front camera
13MP rear camera
5MP front camera
Software Color OS 2.1, Android 4.4.2 KitKat Samsung TouchWiz, Android 5.0.2 Lollipop Android 5.0 Lollipop Zen UI, Android 5.0 Lollipop
Battery 2,320mAh, non-removable 2,600mAh, non-removable 2,400mAh, non-removable 3,000mAh, non-removable
Dimensions 143 x 71 x 6.3mm, 147g 151 x 76.2 x 6.3mm, 141g 145.5 x 72.6 x 7.3mm, 136g 152.5 x 77.2 x 10.9mm, 170g
Fast charging Yes No No Yes

Display

ASUS-Zenfone-2-12

Bringing a great price tag and solid specs, the Asus ZenFone 2 is one of the best mid-range options on the market.

To begin, let’s talk about the display. Mid-tier smartphones have come a long way on the display front, with many options now hitting the market with Full HD panels – and that’s true for the ZenFone 2, the Oppo R7 and the Samsung Galaxy A7. The big difference between these displays, however, is that the R7 and A7 both feature Super AMOLED displays instead of an LCD. AMOLED vs. LCD is still an ongoing debate, but much of the time you’ll find more vivid colors with AMOLED technology and there are certainly a number of folks that prefer AMOLED over LCD.

Unfortunately, Sony chose to go with a 5.0-inch 720p panel on their device, which might upset a few users hoping to get the clear 1080p resolution out of their mid-tier smartphone. Even though having a device with a lower resolution display might result in a tad better battery life, we’re sure most users would choose Full HD over this option if given the chance.

Performance

oppo r7 review aa (3 of 21)

With a Snapdragon 615, the OPPO R7 stands towards the top when it comes to performance.

When it comes to performance, none of these smartphones are particularly poor at handling everyday tasks, though a few still manage to stand out from the rest. The OPPO R7 and ZenFone 2 both performed really well in our full reviews, largely due to their impressive internals.

Featuring 3GB of RAM and a Snapdragon 615 CPU, the R7 is quite the competitor to the ZenFone 2 with 4GB of RAM and Atom Z3580 CPU. Both devices handle gaming quite well, and they do a great job at performing everyday tasks. The Snapdragon 615 found in both the R7 and A7 has proven itself to be quite a capable processor overtime, making both OPPO’s and Samsung’s offerings a great option for those looking for a device with a reliable processor. It should be noted, however, that we have not posted a full review of the A7, so we aren’t as informed on this device as we are with the others. As for the Atom Z3580, while it might perform similarly, Qualcomm processors tend to have better app compatibility and simply have a better rep (810 overheating drama aside).

Last on the list is the Xperia M4 Aqua. While this device features the same 615 processor found in the R7 and A7, our reviews have found that Sony’s offering tends to overheat relatively easily when playing games, which is one of our biggest points of contention with the device.

Camera

The M4 Aqua stands out when it comes to camera performance.

The M4 Aqua stands out when it comes to camera performance.

Oddly enough, all four of the devices we’re comparing today feature 13MP rear-facing cameras, though there’s still a big difference when it comes to image quality.

No matter which device you pick out of the lot, you won’t be disappointed in the camera department. But if you want a mid-range smartphone with a camera that stands above the rest, we’d suggest going with the Xperia M4 Aqua. In our full review, Sony’s offering consistently produced shots with great detail and with vivid colors. Sony’s camera app is quite simplistic and doesn’t come with too many features, though more can be downloaded separately.

Next up we have the OPPO R7 and ASUS ZenFone 2, which both produced average shots in our full reviews. Although we haven’t tested the A7’s camera for ourself, Samsung devices in the past have consistently produced well-balanced, accurate photos. Like most other smartphone cameras, these devices perform best in well-lit areas, with a noticeable decline in quality when moved into low-light situations. Ultimately, the R7 struggles in the post-processing department, while the ZenFone 2 fails to provide an acceptable amount of dynamic range.

All of the extras

Sony-Xperia-M4-Aqua-Review-2

One of Sony’s signature features is waterproofing, and so it is great to see this present in the Xperia M4 Aqua.

Design and build quality are two big areas where manufacturers are shifting focus in the mid-range market, and all four of these smartphones surely don’t disappoint on that front. Whether you choose to go with the familiar design language of Sony’s Xperia M4 Aqua or the premium-feeling OPPO R7, we’re sure most of you won’t have to sacrifice too much when it comes to overall design.

OEMs are also noticeably focusing on their software experiences, too. All of these devices feature software that’s been toned down significantly throughout the past few months, which has been a big pain point for mid-rangers in the past. OPPO’s simplified ColorOS provides a much smoother overall experience, while the ZenFone 2, Xperia M4 Aqua and Galaxy A7 are much more feature-rich than the others. When it comes to software, it ultimately comes down to which OEM skin you prefer, but you really can’t go wrong with any of these options.

OPPO-R7-Hands-on-32

Quick charging? Yes please!

All four of these devices come with non-removable batteries, but that actually may not be a deal breaker. These mid-range offerings can all last around a full day on a single charge, though not much more than that. What’s more, you don’t have to worry about running out of space on your device, because all of them also come with microSD card slots.

The differences begin to really stand out when we take into account other attractive features such as IP68 water and dust resistance or quick charging technology. For instance, I’d much rather recommend the Sony option to anyone who spends the majority of their summer days sitting next to the pool, but I’d rather recommend the OPPO R7 or ZenFone 2 to someone who needs to charge their battery in half the time thanks to integrated quick charging.

Pricing and final thoughts

oppo r7 review aa (7 of 21)

OPPO R7’s design and performance put it towards the top of the list, though ZenFone 2 and the others follow close behind.

Choosing the right smartphone isn’t always an easy decision, and it can take some time to figure out what best suits your needs. Out of the pack, the OPPO R7 seemingly stands out above the rest if you’re looking for a powerful handset with an ultra-premium build and high-end features like quick charging. The ZenFone 2 certainly follows close behind, though many may be turned off by its choice of an Intel processor and its somewhat less attractive design (though that last point is completely subjective).

The Samsung Galaxy A7 also seems like a capable enough device, though we think it’s price tag may be too high for most users looking for a solid mid-range offering. As for the Sony Xperia M4 Aqua? Special features like waterproofing are great, though we certainly are a bit alarmed by the device’s apparent overheating issues.

Related: Best Android phones (June 2015)

All in all, this post is meant to condense our full reviews down to make it easier for you to decide on which phone is right for you. However, that’s not always the easiest way to get information across, so we’ve also linked our full reviews down below. Feel free to let us know which device you think is worth your hard-earned cash, and why the other smartphones won’t find their way into your pocket anytime soon.

More on these great devices

Check out our full reviews:

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PHVsPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19hZF9pbWFnZV8xPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gaHR0cDovL3d3dy5sb2NhbGNsaWNrcGFydG5lcnMuY29tL2FmZmlsaWF0ZV9hZC9hZmZpbGlhdGVfYmFubmVyXzEyNXgxMjUucG5nPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfMjwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGh0dHA6Ly9tb2JpbGViYW5uZXJjcmVhdG9yLmNvbS9iYW5uZXJzLzEyNXgxMjUuZ2lmPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfMzwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGh0dHA6Ly93d3cud29vdGhlbWVzLmNvbS9hZHMvMTI1eDEyNWMuanBnPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfNDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGh0dHA6Ly93d3cud29vdGhlbWVzLmNvbS9hZHMvMTI1eDEyNWQuanBnPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYWRfbXB1X2Fkc2Vuc2U8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSA8c2NyaXB0IGFzeW5jIHNyYz1cImh0dHBzOi8vcGFnZWFkMi5nb29nbGVzeW5kaWNhdGlvbi5jb20vcGFnZWFkL2pzL2Fkc2J5Z29vZ2xlLmpzXCI+PC9zY3JpcHQ+DQo8IS0tIGFuZHJvaWQtem9vbmUgMzAweDI1MCAtLT4NCjxpbnMgY2xhc3M9XCJhZHNieWdvb2dsZVwiDQogICAgIHN0eWxlPVwiZGlzcGxheTpibG9ja1wiDQogICAgIGRhdGEtYWQtY2xpZW50PVwiY2EtcHViLTcwODYxMzIwNjU4MDEyNTJcIg0KICAgICBkYXRhLWFkLXNsb3Q9XCI2MTk2ODExMjk4XCINCiAgICAgZGF0YS1hZC1mb3JtYXQ9XCJhdXRvXCINCiAgICAgZGF0YS1mdWxsLXdpZHRoLXJlc3BvbnNpdmU9XCJ0cnVlXCI+PC9pbnM+DQo8c2NyaXB0Pg0KICAgICAoYWRzYnlnb29nbGUgPSB3aW5kb3cuYWRzYnlnb29nbGUgfHwgW10pLnB1c2goe30pOw0KPC9zY3JpcHQ+PC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYWRfbXB1X2Rpc2FibGU8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBmYWxzZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2FkX21wdV9pbWFnZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGh0dHA6Ly93d3cud29vdGhlbWVzLmNvbS9hZHMvMzAweDI1MGEuanBnPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYWRfbXB1X3VybDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGh0dHA6Ly93d3cud29vdGhlbWVzLmNvbTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2FkX3RvcF9hZHNlbnNlPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gPHNjcmlwdCBhc3luYyBzcmM9XCJodHRwczovL3BhZ2VhZDIuZ29vZ2xlc3luZGljYXRpb24uY29tL3BhZ2VhZC9qcy9hZHNieWdvb2dsZS5qc1wiPjwvc2NyaXB0Pg0KPCEtLSBhbmRyb2lkLXpvb25lIDQ2OHg2MCAtLT4NCjxpbnMgY2xhc3M9XCJhZHNieWdvb2dsZVwiDQogICAgIHN0eWxlPVwiZGlzcGxheTppbmxpbmUtYmxvY2s7d2lkdGg6NDY4cHg7aGVpZ2h0OjYwcHhcIg0KICAgICBkYXRhLWFkLWNsaWVudD1cImNhLXB1Yi03MDg2MTMyMDY1ODAxMjUyXCINCiAgICAgZGF0YS1hZC1zbG90PVwiMzQwNjk5NjQyMlwiPjwvaW5zPg0KPHNjcmlwdD4NCiAgICAgKGFkc2J5Z29vZ2xlID0gd2luZG93LmFkc2J5Z29vZ2xlIHx8IFtdKS5wdXNoKHt9KTsNCjwvc2NyaXB0PjwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2FkX3RvcF9kaXNhYmxlPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gZmFsc2U8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19hZF90b3BfaW1hZ2U8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBodHRwOi8vd3d3Lndvb3RoZW1lcy5jb20vYWRzLzQ2OHg2MGEuanBnPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYWRfdG9wX3VybDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGh0dHA6Ly93d3cud29vdGhlbWVzLmNvbTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2FkX3VybF8xPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gaHR0cDovL3NpdGlvbmV0LmxvY2FsY2xpay5ob3AuY2xpY2tiYW5rLm5ldDwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2FkX3VybF8yPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gaHR0cDovL3NpdGlvbmV0Lm1vYmliYW5uZXIuaG9wLmNsaWNrYmFuay5uZXQ8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19hZF91cmxfMzwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGh0dHA6Ly93d3cud29vdGhlbWVzLmNvbTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2FkX3VybF80PC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYWRzX3JvdGF0ZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19hbHRfc3R5bGVzaGVldDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGdyZWVuLmNzczwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2FyY2hpdmVfZXhjZXJwdDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19hdXRob3I8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSB0cnVlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fYXV0b19pbWc8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBmYWxzZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2Jsb2dfZXhjZXJwdDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19jYXJvdXNlbF9oZWlnaHQ8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSAyOTI8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19jdXN0b21fY3NzPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fY3VzdG9tX2Zhdmljb248L3N0cm9uZz4gLSA8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19jdXN0b21fdXBsb2FkX3RyYWNraW5nPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gYTowOnt9PC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fZXhjbHVkZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGE6Mzp7aTowO2k6MzA7aToyO2k6NTc7aTo0O2k6NTE7fTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2V4Y2x1ZGVfdmlkZW88L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBmYWxzZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2ZlYXRfZW50cmllczwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDM8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19mZWF0dXJlZF9jYXRlZ29yeTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIEFuZHJvaWQ8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19mZWVkYnVybmVyX2lkPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fZmVlZGJ1cm5lcl91cmw8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSA8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19mcmFtZXdvcmtfdmVyc2lvbjwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDUuNS4zPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fZ29vZ2xlX2FuYWx5dGljczwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2hvbWU8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBmYWxzZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX2hvbWVfdGh1bWJfaGVpZ2h0PC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gNTc8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19ob21lX3RodW1iX3dpZHRoPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gMTAwPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29faW1hZ2Vfc2luZ2xlPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gZmFsc2U8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19sb2dvPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gaHR0cDovL2FuZHJvaWQtem9vbmUuY29tL3dwLWNvbnRlbnQvdXBsb2Fkcy8yMDEzLzA1L2xvZ29fYW5kcm9pZF96b29uZTMucG5nPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fbWFudWFsPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL3N1cHBvcnQvdGhlbWUtZG9jdW1lbnRhdGlvbi9nYXpldHRlLWVkaXRpb24vPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fb3B0aW9uczwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGE6NTI6e3M6MTg6Indvb19hbHRfc3R5bGVzaGVldCI7czo5OiJncmVlbi5jc3MiO3M6ODoid29vX2xvZ28iO3M6NzU6Imh0dHA6Ly9hbmRyb2lkLXpvb25lLmNvbS93cC1jb250ZW50L3VwbG9hZHMvMjAxMy8wNS9sb2dvX2FuZHJvaWRfem9vbmUzLnBuZyI7czoxMzoid29vX3RleHR0aXRsZSI7czo1OiJmYWxzZSI7czoxODoid29vX2N1c3RvbV9mYXZpY29uIjtzOjA6IiI7czoyMDoid29vX2dvb2dsZV9hbmFseXRpY3MiO3M6MDoiIjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fZmVlZGJ1cm5lcl91cmwiO3M6MDoiIjtzOjE3OiJ3b29fZmVlZGJ1cm5lcl9pZCI7czowOiIiO3M6MTQ6Indvb19jdXN0b21fY3NzIjtzOjA6IiI7czoxNzoid29vX3Nob3dfY2Fyb3VzZWwiO3M6NDoidHJ1ZSI7czoyMToid29vX2ZlYXR1cmVkX2NhdGVnb3J5IjtzOjc6IkFuZHJvaWQiO3M6MTY6Indvb19mZWF0X2VudHJpZXMiO3M6MToiMyI7czoyNzoid29vX3NsaWRlcl9tYWdhemluZV9leGNsdWRlIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTY6Indvb19zbGlkZXJfc2ZhZGUiO3M6NToiZmFsc2UiO3M6MTY6Indvb19zbGlkZXJfY2ZhZGUiO3M6NToiZmFsc2UiO3M6MTY6Indvb19zbGlkZXJfc3BlZWQiO3M6MzoiMC42IjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fc2xpZGVyX3RpbWVvdXQiO3M6MToiNiI7czoyNDoid29vX3NsaWRlcl9jb250ZW50X3NwZWVkIjtzOjM6IjAuNiI7czoxOToid29vX2Nhcm91c2VsX2hlaWdodCI7czozOiIyOTIiO3M6ODoid29vX2hvbWUiO3M6NToiZmFsc2UiO3M6MTY6Indvb19ibG9nX2V4Y2VycHQiO3M6NDoidHJ1ZSI7czoxOToid29vX2FyY2hpdmVfZXhjZXJwdCI7czo0OiJ0cnVlIjtzOjEwOiJ3b29fYXV0aG9yIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTQ6Indvb19zaG93X3ZpZGVvIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTc6Indvb19leGNsdWRlX3ZpZGVvIjtzOjU6ImZhbHNlIjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fdmlkZW9fY2F0ZWdvcnkiO3M6NjoiVmlkZW9zIjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fd3B0aHVtYl9ub3RpY2UiO3M6MDoiIjtzOjIyOiJ3b29fcG9zdF9pbWFnZV9zdXBwb3J0IjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTQ6Indvb19waXNfcmVzaXplIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTc6Indvb19waXNfaGFyZF9jcm9wIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTA6Indvb19yZXNpemUiO3M6NDoidHJ1ZSI7czoxMjoid29vX2F1dG9faW1nIjtzOjU6ImZhbHNlIjtzOjIwOiJ3b29faG9tZV90aHVtYl93aWR0aCI7czozOiIxMDAiO3M6MjE6Indvb19ob21lX3RodW1iX2hlaWdodCI7czoyOiI1NyI7czoxNToid29vX3RodW1iX3dpZHRoIjtzOjM6IjEwMCI7czoxNjoid29vX3RodW1iX2hlaWdodCI7czoyOiI1NyI7czoxNjoid29vX2ltYWdlX3NpbmdsZSI7czo1OiJmYWxzZSI7czoxNjoid29vX3NpbmdsZV93aWR0aCI7czozOiIyNTAiO3M6MTc6Indvb19zaW5nbGVfaGVpZ2h0IjtzOjM6IjE4MCI7czoxMzoid29vX3Jzc190aHVtYiI7czo1OiJmYWxzZSI7czoxODoid29vX2FkX3RvcF9kaXNhYmxlIjtzOjU6ImZhbHNlIjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fYWRfdG9wX2Fkc2Vuc2UiO3M6MzEzOiI8c2NyaXB0IHR5cGU9InRleHQvamF2YXNjcmlwdCI+PCEtLQ0KZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2NsaWVudCA9ICJjYS1wdWItMTM5NjAzNTE3OTk0ODI2OSI7DQovKiA0Njh4NjBhbmRyb2lkem9vbmUgKi8NCmdvb2dsZV9hZF9zbG90ID0gIjE5MzU4MDg2NzciOw0KZ29vZ2xlX2FkX3dpZHRoID0gNDY4Ow0KZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2hlaWdodCA9IDYwOw0KLy8tLT4NCjwvc2NyaXB0Pg0KPHNjcmlwdCB0eXBlPSJ0ZXh0L2phdmFzY3JpcHQiDQpzcmM9Imh0dHA6Ly9wYWdlYWQyLmdvb2dsZXN5bmRpY2F0aW9uLmNvbS9wYWdlYWQvc2hvd19hZHMuanMiPg0KPC9zY3JpcHQ+IjtzOjE2OiJ3b29fYWRfdG9wX2ltYWdlIjtzOjQwOiJodHRwOi8vd3d3Lndvb3RoZW1lcy5jb20vYWRzLzQ2OHg2MGEuanBnIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfdG9wX3VybCI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRzX3JvdGF0ZSI7czo0OiJ0cnVlIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfMSI7czo0MToiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL2Fkcy8xMjV4MTI1YS5qcGciO3M6MTI6Indvb19hZF91cmxfMSI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfMiI7czo0MToiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL2Fkcy8xMjV4MTI1Yi5qcGciO3M6MTI6Indvb19hZF91cmxfMiI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfMyI7czo0MToiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL2Fkcy8xMjV4MTI1Yy5qcGciO3M6MTI6Indvb19hZF91cmxfMyI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfNCI7czo0MToiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL2Fkcy8xMjV4MTI1ZC5qcGciO3M6MTI6Indvb19hZF91cmxfNCI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjt9PC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fcGlzX2hhcmRfY3JvcDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19waXNfcmVzaXplPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gdHJ1ZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3Bvc3RfaW1hZ2Vfc3VwcG9ydDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19yZXNpemU8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSB0cnVlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fcnNzX3RodW1iPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gZmFsc2U8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19zaG9ydG5hbWU8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSB3b288L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19zaG93X2Nhcm91c2VsPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gdHJ1ZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3Nob3dfdmlkZW88L3N0cm9uZz4gLSB0cnVlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fc2luZ2xlX2hlaWdodDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDE4MDwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3NpbmdsZV93aWR0aDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDI1MDwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3NsaWRlcl9jZmFkZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGZhbHNlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fc2xpZGVyX2NvbnRlbnRfc3BlZWQ8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSAwLjY8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19zbGlkZXJfbWFnYXppbmVfZXhjbHVkZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19zbGlkZXJfc2ZhZGU8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBmYWxzZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3NsaWRlcl9zcGVlZDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDAuNjwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3NsaWRlcl90aW1lb3V0PC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gNjwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3RhYnM8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBmYWxzZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3RleHR0aXRsZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGZhbHNlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fdGhlbWVuYW1lPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gR2F6ZXR0ZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3RodW1iX2hlaWdodDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDU3PC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fdGh1bWJfd2lkdGg8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSAxMDA8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb192aWRlb19jYXRlZ29yeTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIFZpZGVvczwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3dwdGh1bWJfbm90aWNlPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gPC9saT48L3VsPg==