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Google Pixel 5 initial review: The best premium Pixel


The Google Pixel has been a premium product since its inception in 2016. Google wanted the series to rival the iPhone. That is, to have such a tight integration between software and hardware that the experience wasn’t just usable, it was delightful. Until now, however, the company has demanded a premium price to make this happen, but the fact is, Google just doesn’t yet have the die-hard fan base that Apple does. Because of this, Google has had a hard time moving units over the years.

This year, the Mountain View company is taking a different approach. Google is a software company first, and while it still wants the Pixel 5 to be its flagship smartphone for the year, it’s cut some corners to bring the price down to a more affordable level. While last year’s Pixel 4 started at $ 800, the Pixel 5 costs just $ 700.

Was the move worth it? Find out in our Google Pixel 5 review.

About this Google Pixel 5 review: So far, I’ve used the Google Pixel 5 over a period of four days. The phone was running Android 11 on the October 2020 security patch. Because we don’t believe four days is enough time to conduct a full Google Pixel 5 review, we’re offering you our initial review, with an update in the form of a full Google Pixel 5 review coming a bit later.

Google Pixel 5 Google’s first 5G smartphone
The Google Pixel 5 may not be the high-end Pixel we were expecting, but it’s a pretty compelling mid-range option. Google is going back to basics with the Pixel 5, ditching higher-end features like face recognition and the quirky Motion Sense gestures.

Design and display: Refining the basics

Google Pixel 5 display 1

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority
  • 144.7 x 70.4 x 8.0mm, 151g
  • Rear-mounted fingerprint sensor
  • Chrome power button
  • Aluminum and bio-resin design
  • IP68 water and dust resistance
  • 6-inch AMOLED (2,340 x 1,080)
  • 19.5:9 aspect ratio
  • Minimal bezels
  • Hole-punch selfie cutout
  • 90Hz adaptive refresh rate

When you look at the Google Pixel 5, it is immediately recognizable as a Google phone. It follows the same general design ethos as the Pixel 4a and Pixel 4a 5G and also snags various design elements from last year’s Pixel 4 series. The rounded design and squircle-shaped camera module have become staples for the Pixel series for two years running. The Chrome “G” logo near the bottom of the phone’s back side should help if you were still having trouble determining the phone’s origin.

This year, Google has brought back the rear-mounted fingerprint reader, which is a nice case of foresight on Google’s part considering the ongoing pandemic. The bottom of the phone houses a USB-C port and speakers. The right side sports the volume rocker and a chrome power button. These buttons take a bit of force to press and are fairly clicky, but I noticed they don’t feel quite as clicky as the Pixel 4a’s.

The body of the Google Pixel 5 is made of aluminum, with a special “bio-resin” composite (that’s sciencey jargon for plastic) poured on top. This gives it just a little bit more of a gritty feeling than the Pixel 4a, but the speckled look makes me wish it was even more coarse, like that of the sandstone OnePlus One. While the aluminum and bio-resin combo doesn’t feel quite as premium as the glass Pixel 4, it should certainly be more resistant to breaks and cracks, on the rear at least.

The Pixel 5 also sports IP68 water and dust resistance. This is a spec we expect to see in most flagship devices. It’s a relief to not have to worry about using your phone out in the rain. Combined with the aluminum and plastic design, the Pixel 5 should be quite sturdy overall. I’m a fan.

The display of the Pixel 5 is an FHD+ adaptive AMOLED that can achieve a refresh rate of 90Hz. Adaptive means it can dynamically switch between 60Hz and 90Hz depending on what the phone is doing, and it feels great. I’ve been a bit spoiled by the extremely fast 120Hz and 144Hz displays of other flagship devices, but the 90Hz display on the Pixel 5 didn’t bother me one bit.

Google Pixel 5 notch hole macro 1

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

The quality of the Pixel 5’s display is nothing short of fantastic. The colors look incredible and everything seems to pop right off the screen. The display of the Pixel 4a was one of the best we’ve tested this year, and there’s no doubt the display of the Pixel 5 touts similar quality. It’s just great.

This year’s Pixels have fantastic displays, and the Pixel 5’s is especially great.

There is a punch-hole in the top left side of the Pixel 5’s display. It houses the front-facing camera. I’m personally a huge fan of punch-hole selfie shooters because they’re about the same size as a notification icon, so they don’t feel like they’re in the way. My roommate hates the design, but this is a highly personal design opinion.

Overall, the Google Pixel 5 doesn’t feel quite as premium as the Pixel 4 before it, but it nails all the design choices that bring a good experience to a phone. While Google undoubtedly went more simplistic this year, I don’t think it needs to be fancy in its designs. Pixels are portals to the quintessential Google experience, and that’s all they really need to be.

Performance and battery: Less is more

Google Pixel 5 in hand 1 1

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 765G
  • X55 5G mobile platform
  • 8GB of RAM
  • 128GB of storage
  • No microSD card expansion
  • 4,080mAh battery
  • 18W wired charging
  • Wireless and reverse wireless charging

Possibly one of the most controversial decisions Google made this year was not using the current flagship processor from Qualcomm, the Snapdragon 865. Instead, it opted for the tuned-down Snapdragon 765G, which keeps several core features like 5G but cuts down on throughput to the camera as well as core processing speeds.

Many people may be upset that you can’t get a Pixel that competes with other flagships on a raw performance basis this year, but I’d wager that Pixels don’t need to be the fastest phones on the market. The whole point of the Pixel experience is a move towards ambient computing. That is, using your phone less and getting the information you need with your voice. Plus, the Pixel UI is so well-tuned to Pixel hardware, you probably won’t notice any slowdowns unless you’re playing the most demanding games the Play Store has to offer.

In everyday use, the Pixel 5 performed adequately. I didn’t notice any performance issues or slowdowns, and the phone jumped between apps with ease. There were no apps kicked from RAM due to the healthy 8GB of memory, while the 90Hz display made everything feel fluid. That being said, I don’t game on my phone very often, and there are sure to be plenty of dedicated gaming Pixel 5 reviews if you look around.

In benchmarks, the Google Pixel 5 performed well enough, but it certainly wasn’t the highest score for a Snapdragon 765G device. The Google Pixel 5 notched a score of 2,633 in Geekbench 4 single-core and 5,994 in multi-core. In comparison, the OnePlus Nord scored 2,853 and 7,896 in Geekbench 4 single- and multi-core tests, respectively.

One spec that the Snapdragon 765G does hold on to compared to the 865 is 5G connectivity. The Pixel 5 uses the slower Qualcomm X52 modem vs the X55 you’ll find in the flagship variant, but if you’re getting mid-band 5G in your area you could still see a nice boost in speeds. I was hanging with a friend on a rooftop recently and noticed I was pulling 150Mbps down on Google Fi 5G. If you’re on Verizon, the Pixel 5 supports mmWave 5G as well, which can pull down even more insane speeds.

5G probably isn’t a game-changer for most people, but it can pull some impressive speeds if you have coverage.

The Pixel 5 sports 128GB of storage, which should be adequate for most people. It is a bit funny that even the $ 350 Pixel 4a sports the same capacity, but that’s more of a positive for the Pixel 4a then a negative for the Pixel 5. Expandable storage would have been a good way to set the Pixel 5 further apart from the Pixel 4a or Pixel 4a 5G, but Google’s aggressive storage offloading via apps like Google Photos should make this a healthy capacity for most.

Another pretty massive change this year is the move to a much bigger battery on the Pixel 5. The phone sports a 4,080mAh cell. While that’s not quite as massive as some competing phones, it’s easily the biggest cell ever in a Pixel phone. For comparison, the Pixel 4 sported a 2,800mAh battery and used a more power-hungry processor in the form of the Qualcomm Snapdragon 855. Considering the Pixel 4’s abysmal battery was the weakest point about the phone, the bigger cell is a welcome change.

In daily use, the battery life on the Pixel 5 was quite good. On an average day, the phone lasted nearly eight hours of screen-on time, equating to taking the device off the charger at 8:30 AM and seeing it die around 11 PM the next day. On a heavier day where I shot plenty of 4K video, used almost exclusively mobile data, and didn’t have service for a good portion of the day, the phone pulled closer to six hours of screen-on time. I took it off the charger at 7:30 AM that day and it had 10% left when I went to bed at 12:30 AM. Not bad.

The Pixel 5 ships with an 18W fast charger. While that’s an acceptable charging speed, it’s starting to feel quite slow compared to its competition. This was fast around the era of the original Pixel, but since then, even mid-ranged devices can hit 30W of charging, with other devices like the Oppo Find X2 Pro or OnePlus 8T hitting 65W from a cable. I feel like I say this every single time I review a Pixel, but I’d really like to see faster wired charging speeds from Google.

Google Pixel 5 on windowsill

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

That being said, Google has managed to pack wireless and reverse wireless charging into the Pixel 5. Considering this phone’s chassis is mostly made of aluminum, this is one of the first metal phones to rock wireless charging. To do this, Google cut out a hole in the aluminum chassis for the wireless charging coil, then coated the body in the bio-resin plastic we talked about earlier. Smart stuff.

Wireless charging is a spec that isn’t strictly necessary, but I’m extremely happy to see it on Google’s flagship Pixel. It’s one of those extra little bits that make the Pixel 5 worth choosing over the Pixel 4a or Pixel 4a 5G. Considering I have multiple wireless chargers hanging out around my apartment, it’s easy to keep the phone topped up at all times.

Camera: Wider with better video, otherwise more of the same

Google Pixel 5 taking a photo 3

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority
  • Main: 12MP
  • Wide: 16MP
  • Selfie: 8MP

Up until the Pixel 3, Google touted its impressive photo quality from a single camera using computational photography. But by the time the Pixel 4 launched, there was enough pressure from the rest of the industry to add another sensor. Weirdly, the Pixel 4 used a 2x telephoto sensor in addition to its main lens, which was a controversial choice considering it was touting the capabilities of its super-res zoom tech at the same time.

Go in-depth: Behind the scenes: Google’s Pixel cameras aren’t trying to be cameras at all

This year, Google is adapting to the blowback of the Pixel 4. It instead opted to add a wide-angle camera to the Pixel 5. This gives you three effective zoom ranges if you count the 2x super-res zoom from the main sensor. I’m personally happy to have a 0.6x wide-angle camera represented.

The main camera on the Pixel 5 is the same 12MP sensor we’ve seen effectively since the beginning of the Pixel line, and by and large, it looks wildly similar to images from the Google Pixel 4. The biggest difference I’ve noticed between the two phones is a shift towards warmer images, which will likely look a bit more pleasing to many people.

As stated earlier, the wide camera is 0.6x zoom, which gives you a decent amount of range but isn’t quite as wide as some other flagships on the market. The color profile does seem fairly similar to that of the main camera, but there’s a strange shift in view when you switch from standard to wide mode.

While the quality of the Pixel cameras has been considered incredible for many years, the unwillingness to adapt to change is starting to make Google’s cameras look a bit long in the tooth. Pixels have always had a pretty high amount of contrast and sharpness, which looked good when there wasn’t a ton of information from the sensor. However, now that camera sensors on other smartphones are getting larger, Google’s processing feels like a bit more of a crutch.

The comparison I can make here is that of programming for individual use cases versus creating an algorithm that will cover all cases. While the Pixel 5 can make people look quite good when it recognizes faces using semantic segmentation, busier scenes involving people will often process people like the rest of the scene. And while portrait mode can be good at cutting things out with a depth map (though it still struggles with hair), a larger sensor with real depth of field would work perfectly every time.

Look, Pixel 5 images look good in general, but scenes with a lot of detail in them can look busy and overly contrasted. It’s fairly easy to see when a camera has a small sensor. Even with the Pixel’s fantastic processing, you can still tell. While I don’t think most people are going to dislike images from the Pixel 5, it’s a bit frustrating to not see a fundamental size change after so much time. Like I say every year, hopefully, next year.

The sample images in this review have been compressed to optimize load times for the website. If you want to view all the images taken for this review in full resolution, you can do so here.

Almost everyone will like photos from the Pixel 5, but a bigger sensor would have maintained its reputation as the king of smartphone cameras.

That being said, this wouldn’t be a new Google flagship without some fun computational imaging features. And while none of the new features will blow the lid off your head as they have in previous Pixels, they’re still pretty cool.

The first new camera feature is called portrait light. This emulates a floating light source that you can shift around the scene and vary in intensity to add or reduce contrast to a subject’s face or clothes. It works quite well. You can use it on any photo, as long as there is a person detected in the image. You can even use it on old images, or images that haven’t actually been taken with the Pixel. Pretty slick. This feature will be coming to Google Photos down the line, but it’s on Google Pixel 4a 5G and Google Pixel 5 first.

The second feature is actually a nod to video, which is nice to see on a Pixel phone. This feature is called Cinematic Pan and uses slow-motion video and software cropping to produce some incredibly smooth pans. In use, this looks quite good, and it’s nice to see Google caring more about video features. There’s also a new stabilization mode menu, which will let you select between Standard, Locked, Active, and Cinematic Pan depending on what kind of movement you’re doing.

Portrait mode can now work in low light in conjunction with Night Sight. This will allow your subjects to stand out from the background even in low light, something only cameras with bigger sensors can usually do well. This feature is cool, and especially welcome considering the small sensor. Even against the huge Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra sensor, the Pixel 5 can still hold its own.

On the selfie side, we’re seeing what we’ve seen from previous Pixels. This is the same 8MP shooter you’re used to. It takes nice images overall, especially with the help of semantic segmentation. You can use portrait mode and Night Sight in selfie mode too, which offer 1.2x and 1.4x crops respectively. Selfie video has a time-lapse mode, which offers playback in 1x, 5x, 10x, 30x, and 120x speeds. This should be beneficial for people who want to vlog with their phones.

Speaking of video, Google has allowed for some pretty nice features here. Those include 4K 60fps recording, slow motion, a time-lapse mode, and four different stabilization modes. You’ve got Standard mode for light movement, Locked mode for far away still shots as if the phone was on a tripod, Active mode for heavy movement or running, and the Cinematic Pan I mentioned earlier.

Here’s a sample of 4k 30fps video footage in standard stabilization mode. Overall, I think the footage looks quite grainy, with a lot of noise in the shadows. I’m glad Google is adding all these new video features, but it would be a lot better if the sensor was bigger so the phone could capture more light.

Google’s camera app is quite good, though. Most features are very easy to find and the phone doesn’t feel like it’s got too many features you’ll never use. There are primary function tabs on the bottom with some extra features around the shutter, and deeper settings in the pull-down menu. I’m a fan.

The addition of a wide-angle camera was a good move, but I can’t stress how much I would love to see Google use a bigger sensor on the next Pixel. Processing on that small 12MP sensor will still be perfectly fine for most people, but when you compare it to other flagships shipping lately, the quality difference starts to show.

Software: Brilliantly simple

Google Pixel 5 Android norification tray 1

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority
  • Android 11
  • Pixel Launcher

The Google Pixel 5 ships with Android 11, running Pixel UI on top. This is widely considered one of the best skins on Android due to its tight integration with things like the Google Assistant. Google also, you know, makes Android, so you’d hope its take on the operating system would be good.

Android 11 added features that we previously lamented for not being in Pixel devices. It’s refreshing to finally have things like native screen recording. The new conversation notifications, on the other hand, are a handy way of grouping your important notifications from the non-important ones. Having your smart home controls a power button hold away is super convenient too. This is a legitimately great version of Android, and you can read more about its best features here.

Several software features are exclusive to Pixel devices. Call Screening, Now Playing, and Google Recorder are just a few, and it’s undoubtedly true that you’ll get one of the most intelligent Android experiences on a Google Pixel phone. Almost all of Pixel’s unique features are things you’ll actually use and not gimmicks too. That’s not something that can be said of every smartphone.

Another important part of the Pixel software experience is that Google guarantees software updates and support for at least three years. That means the Google Pixel 5 will definitely receive Android 14, and will likely end up with Android 15 as well. Very few Android smartphones guarantee this much software support. This makes the Pixel devices some of your best options if you want to continuously upgrade to the latest version of Android. Moreover, owning a Pixel means you also have access to Android betas, if you’re into that kind of thing.

Google Pixel 5 specs

  Google Pixel 5
Display 6-inch OLED
2,340 x 1,080 resolution
432ppi
90Hz refresh rate
19.5:9 aspect ratio
>1,000,000:1 contrast ratio
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 765G
2x Cortex-A76
6x Cortex-A55
Titan M Security Module
GPU Adreno 620
RAM 8GB
LPDDR4x
Storage 128GB
No microSD slot
Cameras Rear
Main: 12.2MP, f/1.7 aperture, 1.4µm pixels, optical + electronic image stabilization
Secondary: 16MP, f/2.2 aperture, 1 micron pixel, ultra-wide (107-degree FoV)
4K at 60fps/30fps

Front
8MP sensor, f/2.0 aperture, 1.12µm pixels, fixed focus, 83-degree FoV

Headphone jack No
Battery 4,080mAh
18W charging
12W wireless charging
Reverse wireless charging
IP rating IP68
Sensors Proximity / ambient light sensor
Accelerometer
Gyrometer
Magnetometer
Pixel Imprint fingerprint sensor
Barometer
Spectral and flicker sensor
Software Android 11
Dimensions and weight 144.7 x 70.4 x 8mm
151g
Colors Just Black, Sorta Sage

Google Pixel 5 review: Value and competition

Google Pixel 5 Google logo macro

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority
  • Google Pixel 5: $ 699

At $ 699, the Pixel 5 easily undercuts a lot of other flagships on the market, but if you’re looking at devices from a raw specs perspective, it could seem a bit lackluster. That being said, Pixel phones offer a lot more value than raw performance from their tight integration with Google apps and services to their fast, guaranteed updates. Pixel devices are also genuinely a pleasure to use, and I think there’s a lot of value in that alone.

Google Pixel 5 Google’s first 5G smartphone
The Google Pixel 5 may not be the high-end Pixel we were expecting, but it’s a pretty compelling mid-range option. Google is going back to basics with the Pixel 5, ditching higher-end features like face recognition and the quirky Motion Sense gestures.

If you’re looking for power, something like the OnePlus 8T comes in at just $ 50 more at $ 749, but sports 65W wired charging, a 120Hz display, and far more cameras… for better or worse. It also flexes a Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 processor. Unfortunately, it drops wireless charging. Check out our full review here for more info.

Another option around this price range is the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE, which also has a Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 processor, multiple cameras, and a 120Hz display. If you’re a fan of Samsung devices, this is one of the most affordable options with this much power. Check out our full review here to learn more.

If you’re a fan of iOS, Apple just announced the iPhone 12 Mini, which also matches the Pixel 5’s price of $ 699. The iPhone 12 Mini has a much faster processor in the form of the new Apple A14 Bionic, but it loses out on refresh rate and the quality of its personal digital assistant. While we haven’t been able to do a full review on this device yet, we’ll share our thoughts soon.

If you’re someone who needs more power for things like gaming or better video, you might want to look at more specialized options like the Asus ROG Phone 3, the Sony Xperia 1 II, or Sony Xperia 5 II. That being said, those phones start closer to $ 1,000 or more, so they’re not really in the same ballpark.

Personally, I think $ 649 would have been a better price for the Pixel 5. The price difference between the Google Pixel 4a and Google Pixel 4a 5G is $ 150. Google slapping an extra $ 200 on the price tag for an aluminum frame, wireless charging, IP68 water and dust resistance, 2GB more RAM, and a 90Hz display seems a bit excessive. Considering the Pixel 4a 5G is effectively a perfectly balanced mix of the Pixel 4a and the Pixel 5, a similar $ 150 price difference would have seemed more appropriate.

Google Pixel 5 review: Should you buy it?

Google Pixel 5 in hand 3

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

Personally, I’m a huge fan of the Google Pixel 5. It has a genuinely wonderful display, fantastic battery life, and all the small things I love like wireless charging and IP68 water resistance. Additionally, the extremely tight integration with Google’s apps and services, unique features through Google Assistant, and guaranteed updates for three years add a lot more value than a spec sheet can tell.

If you are willing to spend $ 700 and you’re sure you want an Android phone, I can definitely recommend the Google Pixel 5. It may not have the fastest processor, the quickest charging, the highest refresh rate display, or the biggest camera sensors, but the Google Pixel 5 does the basics better than almost any other smartphone on the market. The Google Pixel 5 is genuinely a pleasure to use.

That’s been our initial Google Pixel 5 review. We’ll update it in the following days with more insight and impressions about Google’s new premium phone. Stay tuned!


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The Google Pixel 5 is here, but should you wait for the OnePlus 8T?


OnePlus Nord vs Pixel 4a Pixel in focus camera module against OnePlus Nord background

Credit: Ryan-Thomas Shaw / Android Authority

The wait is finally over. The Google Pixel 5 is here! With a more attractive price point than ever before, there’s a lot to like about Google’s latest flagship. However, the Pixel 5 isn’t without competition. The new price puts it right up against more cost-effective brands, including the ever-popular OnePlus.

Value for money has been a cornerstone of the OnePlus ethos for years, while Google is relatively new to the super mid-tier game. But Mountain View is a quick study, building on the success of the affordable Pixel 3a with its new lineup. So, is it worth waiting a few more weeks to see what the Shenzhen brand has in store with the eagerly-awaited OnePlus 8T, or is Google’s phone a safe buy today? Let’s take an early look at the OnePlus 8T vs Google Pixel 5.

Related: The best Google Pixel 5 alternatives

Google Pixel 5: Buy now?

Google is offering its first 5G-ready flagship smartphone with the Pixel 5, but unlike more expensive flagships it is using Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 765G SoC to power the handset — the same chipset found in OnePlus’ budget phone, the OnePlus Nord. The integrated modem and the lower performance point are a boon for battery life and price, but that comes at the cost of peak performance compared to similarly-priced devices. That’s not to say that Google’s flagship is slow; there’s 8GB RAM for smooth multi-tasking. The phone will handle all your day-to-day needs and even most games just fine.

Deep dive: Snapdragon 765G vs Snapdragon 865: How will the Pixel 5 stack up?

What the Pixel 5 lacks in brute power, it makes up for in features. Google includes wireless charging, an IP68 rating, and a great 90Hz display. Let’s not forget three years of Android updates either. That’s pretty much everything that you’d want from a flagship handset, and many brands charge much more for these features. Google has struck a nice balance between performance, features, and price.

The US Pixel 5 model also supports mmWave. This promises even faster 5G data speeds on compatible networks than sub-6GHz 5G. Although this brings the price up a tad to $ 699, it’s a little more expensive than non-US versions of the handset. Still, that’s quite cheap for a mmWave phone.

Google is offering its best in class phone cameras for the most affordable price ever.

Of course, you’re also getting one of the industry’s best smartphone cameras. The formula feels very familiar, with a 12MP main sensor, an 8MP selfie camera, and Google’s software smarts to spruce up the results. The Pixel 5 throws in a new 16MP wide-angle sensor for a little more shooting flexibility, but it’s a considerably more retrained package than the quad-camera setups permeating the market. Still, quality is better than quantity, and the Pixel 5 almost certainly won’t disappoint here.

There’s also software to consider too. Fans of “stock” Android may prefer to pick up the Pixel 5 today. After all, you’re getting the latest Android 11 out of the box and three years of updates. Android 11 includes the new conversation notification, notification history, chat bubbles, a screen recorder, and media control features. Google’s OS is as feature-rich as any other these days.

$ 699 .00
Google Pixel 5

Buy it Now

Google Pixel 5 Buy it Now
$ 699 .00

OnePlus 8T: Should you wait?

OnePlus logo 1

We might be waiting on the finer details about the OnePlus 8T’s features, but what we can say for certain is that it will be the preferred pick for the performance enthusiast if the leaked specs are correct. The premium-tier Snapdragon 865 trounces the Pixel 5’s Snapdragon 765G in gaming, heavy lifting, and AI scenarios. Day-to-day, there’s unlikely to be much noticeable difference between the phones. Yet, there’s no doubt that the OnePlus 8T will win out where extra performance is concerned.

The 8T tweaks the existing OnePlus 8 formula.

There’s an overkill 12GB RAM model rumored, and OnePlus is also set to offer a 256GB storage option for media lovers, doubling the 128GB maximum storage option from Google. The OnePlus 8T looks set to win hands down here. The phone is also 5G-ready, but likely on with sub-6GHz support, if you’re on a compatible network.

The OnePlus 8T is also confirmed to support 65W wired charging and is rumored to house a bigger 4,500mAh battery. That’s twice as fast as previous 30W Warp Charge implementations. The phone should also have its own FHD+ 120Hz display, but is reportedly missing the wireless charging and IP rating of the OnePlus 8 Pro and Pixel 5. There’s a quad-camera setup on the way, with a 48MP main sensor, 16MP wide-angle, 5MP macro, and a 2MP monochrome lens. This is a very flexible package that offers more options than Google. However, we’ve had some reservations about the overall quality of OnePlus’ camera setups in the past, particularly when it comes to more gimmicky low-resolution cameras.

Read more: OnePlus 8T: All the rumors and everything we know so far

When it comes to software, OnePlus’ much-lauded Oxygen OS has taken a controversial turn recently. OnePlus’ Oxygen OS 11 software is a bit more heavy-handed on the UI tweaks than previous generations. The OS offers some handy new features though. Those include a new always-on display, tweaks to Zen Mode, and dark mode scheduling. Google’s take on Android is far from bare-bones either, but Android enthusiasts may start leaning towards Google’s implementation.

OnePlus 8T vs Google Pixel 5: Should you wait?

google assistant hold for me pixel 5

Credit: Google

We don’t know exactly how much the OnePlus 8T will cost just yet, but rumors point to a competitive price. One that looks set to see the phone go head to head with the Google Pixel 5.

Rumors point to a €599 ($ 695) entry point for the OnePlus 8T. That’s a smidgen cheaper than the €629 launch price for Google’s Pixel 5, but pretty much the same as the Pixel 5’s $ 699 US price with mmWave in tow. An Amazon Germany listing (now taken down) mentioned a price set at €693.18 (~$ 815) for the more beefy 12GB RAM, 256GB variant of the 8T, which is a bit more expensive. While final and regional pricing may vary by a small amount, these two handsets definitely fall into the same affordable 5G phone category.

Pick OnePlus for raw performance, Pixel for refined software

On paper, the OnePlus 8T should be best placed to cater to performance enthusiasts and will have a speedier 120Hz display too. It’s also expected to offer a more flexible camera setup, more internal storage, and should shave a few dollars off the price tag. However, it’s the Pixel 5 that offers a slightly wider range of features including wireless charging, 5G mmWave in the US, a more refined imaging experience, and perhaps the better software experience too. It’s a very close call between the two, as expected.

The OnePlus 8T looks set to be another very competent handset from OnePlus, but the formula feels very familiar to the OnePlus 8. If you weren’t contemplating a OnePlus handset already, there’s no major reason for fans of Google’s ecosystem to delay any further. Especially after such a long wait for the Google Pixel 5!

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Google Pixel 5 buyer’s guide: Everything you need to know


The Google Pixel 5 is finally official and we have all the details. In this Google Pixel 5 buyer’s guide, we’ve got the info you’ll need to make a smart purchase decision and we answer your frequently asked questions.

Editor’s note: We’ll regularly update this Pixel 5 guide with more tips, resources, and details, so stay tuned.

Google Pixel 5 at a glance

Google Pixel 5 Google’s first 5G smartphone
The Google Pixel 5 may not be the high-end Pixel we were expecting, but it’s a pretty compelling mid-range option. Google is going back to basics with the Pixel 5, ditching higher-end features like face recognition and the quirky Motion Sense gestures.

The Pixel 5 was announced on September 30, 2020 at Google’s Launch Night In event. This is Google’s top-end phone of 2020 and it’s a great option if you want:

  • A more affordable 5G phone with some flagship-level features
  • A great camera experience
  • A smaller-than-typical size
  • Quality software and guaranteed updates

The Pixel 5 costs $ 699 in the US, where it’s available in only one size, two colors, and one storage configuration. It competes with the LG Velvet, the OnePlus 8, OnePlus Nord (outside the US), the Samsung Galaxy A71, the Galaxy S20 FE, and a slew of other upper mid-range to flagship 5G phones.

You should avoid the Pixel 5 if you want:

  • The best performance possible in a phone
  • Two-day battery life or more
  • The best zoom capabilities

Further reading: The best Google products

Is the Google Pixel 5 worth buying?

The $ 699 Google Pixel 5 looks like a great phone on paper in North America, with brands like Realme and Xiaomi not a factor on the continent. But it still seems like a good purchase in general if you want a 5G phone with brisk updates and flagship-style features but don’t want to pay 2020 flagship money.

In saying so, Google’s Pixel phones have previously suffered from hardware problems, while Pixel spec sheets traditionally tend to be pretty anemic compared to phones from other brands. Those on the hunt for the most bang for their buck or the most reliable phone should keep this in mind.

In the case of the spec sheet, the Pixel 4 was arguably the least impressive flagship of 2019, packing a small battery and lacking a triple rear camera setup seen on rival phones. For the Pixel 5, it looks like Google has beefed things up in some ways, but not in others.

What other AA readers think of the Google Pixel 5

This marks the first time that Google ditches flagship silicon for its high-end Pixels, adopting an upper mid-range Snapdragon 765G processor. Is this a no-go for Android Authority readers though? Well, over 1,600 readers took our poll back in June, with almost 57% saying it wasn’t a dealbreaker.

Pixel 5 mid range chipset poll results

Credit: Hadlee Simons / Android Authority

This suggested that Android Authority readers were willing to overlook the lack of top-end power if the Pixel 5 delivered in other areas (e.g. pricing and extra features).

Earlier this week, we also asked readers whether the then-rumored price tag for the Pixel 5 was worth it. This question was asked prior to specs and other features being disclosed by Google. As of writing, the most popular choice was “it’s a bit expensive but worth it for a Pixel.” Check out the results below.

Pixel 5 worth it poll results

Credit: Hadlee Simons / Android Authority

Just over 25% of readers said that the phone is outright overpriced. But between respondents wanting to see the spec sheet, those who think it’s a bargain, and those who think it’s worth it for a Pixel, it looks like Google might have landed on a solid price.

Google Pixel 5 specs

The Google Pixel 5 isn’t going to win any awards for sheer horsepower, but the phone still brings quite a few features to the table anyway. Check out our Google Pixel 5 specs overview below.

  Google Pixel 5
Display 6-inch OLED
2,340 x 1,080 resolution
19.5:9 aspect ratio
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 765G
2x Cortex-A76
6x Cortex-A55
GPU Adreno 620
RAM 8GB
Storage 128GB
No microSD slot
Cameras Rear:

Main:
12.2MP, f/1.7, 1.4µm pixels, optical + electronic image stabilization

Secondary:
16MP, f/2.2, 1 micron pixel, ultra-wide (107 degree FoV)

Front:
8MP sensor, f/2.0, 1.12µm pixels, fixed focus, 83-degree field-of-view

Headphone jack No
Battery 4,080mAh
18W charging
Wireless charging
IP rating IP68
Software Android 11

What should you expect from the Pixel 5 camera?

Google Pixel 5 cameras

Credit: Hadlee Simons / Android Authority

The Pixel 5 adopts the same 12MP IMX363 main camera we’ve seen on several generations of Pixels now, including the Pixel 3a and Pixel 4a. If anything, we’re expecting software to make the difference when shooting via this main camera.

The secondary camera is a completely different story though, as Google has eschewed the Pixel 4 line’s 16MP telephoto camera in favor of a 16MP ultra-wide shooter. This new camera means you can capture many scenes without having to take a few steps back, such as cityscapes, landscapes, and groups of people. But what does this mean for the phone’s zoom capabilities?

Google touted its Super Res Zoom solution on the Pixel 3, using super resolution algorithms and more to deliver hybrid zoom that was better than traditional digital zoom. However, results still fell short of phones with dedicated telephoto lenses, especially when going beyond 2x or 3x shots. The Pixel 4 then introduced the 2x telephoto camera, and this allowed for a big step up in quality at short range zoom levels, while also delivering improved Super Res Zoom images up to 8x.

We’re expecting the Pixel 5 zoom quality to be something akin to the Pixel 3’s quality. Super Res Zoom without a telephoto lens should still produce fine results when taking 2x or 3x zoom shots. Nevertheless, check back here soon for our thoughts on the Pixel 5’s zoom abilities once we’ve had a go with it.

More on zoom: Don’t believe what smartphone manufacturers tell you about zoom

Google Night Sight Portrait Mode

Credit: Google

In addition, Google is giving HDR+ a “serious upgrade.” Google is introducing exposure bracketing on the Pixel 5 that should result in all-around clearer photos with the new wide-angle lens.

Night Sight, Google’s fantastic low-light camera mode, is also coming to portrait mode. Portrait Light is coming to portrait mode, too. You can add this effect to your portrait photos after you’ve taken a picture if your subject is too dark.

Google is finally focusing on video, at least a little bit. It’s adding three new stabilization modes to the Pixel 5: locked, active, and cinematic pan. The latter video mode “creates sweeping, dramatic Hollywood effects” through stabilizing and slowing down the motion of your video at 2x.

How is the Pixel 5 battery life?

We haven’t spent enough time with the Pixel 5 yet to answer this question, but we do know the phone packs a much bigger battery than the Pixel 4a and the Pixel 4. In fact, the Pixel 5 battery is over 1,000mAh bigger than the Pixel 4’s 2,800mAh pack.

The Pixel 5 does offer 5G connectivity, which consumes more power than 4G, but we’re still expecting longer battery life than the Pixel 4. Judging by the Pixel 4a’s good endurance with a 3,140mAh battery (6.5 to seven hours of screen-on time), we’re hoping that the Pixel 5 will be able to reach similar heights.

Google is also introducing extreme battery saver mode on the Pixel 5. This allows you to decide which apps you’d like to keep on while everything else is paused. Google says this will get you up to 48 hours of extra battery life.

Is the Pixel 5 fast enough?

One thing that’s a certainty is that the Pixel 5 is weaker than the Pixel 4 and other 2019 flagships (let alone 2020 flagships) when it comes to sheer CPU and graphical power. Our own Robert Triggs compared the Snapdragon 765G to 2020 and 2019 flagship silicon, and the results tell us a lot.

The CPU performance gap is pretty small between the Snapdragon 765G and the Snapdragon 855 when it comes to single-core performance. But the Snapdragon 855 streaks ahead when it comes to multi-core results, owing to it offering more heavyweight CPU cores. We also see a pretty big gap when it comes to graphical performance.

In other words, those wanting to play the most advanced games and emulators at a smooth framerate might want to buy a Snapdragon 865 or Snapdragon 855 phone. But the Pixel 5’s chipset should still deliver great performance in general and in most games.

Google Pixel 5 vs Pixel 4: What’s new?

google pixel 4 xl oh so orange camera module

The Pixel 5 lacks two main features compared to the Pixel 4, and that’s the flagship silicon and Motion Sense/face unlock technology. We’ve already covered the chipset disparity, but the lack of Motion Sense and associated face unlock tech is pretty notable.

Motion Sense gestures weren’t to everyone’s liking, while face unlock has become less important than ever thanks to COVID-19. Google has however resurrected the rear fingerprint scanner, allowing you to unlock your phone while still wearing a mask. Furthermore, fingerprint unlock is supported by a ton of apps (unlike face unlock).

Otherwise, the Pixel 5 also sees RAM and base storage upgrades. Instead of the Pixel 4’s 6GB of RAM and 64GB of base storage (with an option for 128GB), you’ve got 8GB of RAM and 128GB as the sole option.

Moving to photography, Google has ditched the Pixel 4 family’s 16MP telephoto secondary camera in favor of a 16MP ultra-wide secondary shooter. It’s disappointing that Google didn’t offer a flexible triple rear camera setup, as we’ve seen from rival manufacturers. Nevertheless, we’re glad to see an ultra-wide rear camera on a Pixel, and Super Res Zoom should still deliver decent results at short range zoom factors.

We also see a battery capacity bump compared to the Pixel 4 series, leaping to 4,080mAh. Meanwhile, the Pixel 4 packs a 2,800mAh cell while the Pixel 4 XL offers a 3,700mAh battery. We’re guessing that endurance will be somewhere between the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL (owing to the Pixel 5’s 5G support), but hopefully it’s closer to the XL model.

The screen size falls in between the Pixel 4’s 5.8-inch panel and the XL’s 6.3-inch screen, coming in at 6-inches (19.5:9, 2,340 x 1,080). Much like the Pixel 4a though, the Pixel 5 packs a more modern punch-hole cutout instead of a bezel or notch.

What about the Google Pixel 4a 5G?

GOOGLE PIXEL 4A 5G PRESS RENDERS 6

Credit: Google

The cheaper Pixel 4a 5G has quite a bit in common with the Pixel 5. The biggest shared feature is the Snapdragon 765G chipset and associated 5G connectivity. You’re getting less RAM with the cheaper phone (6GB), but the common silicon means you can expect a similar level of performance on the whole.

Other common features include the same dual rear camera setup (normal and ultra-wide), 128GB of storage, and 18W wired charging. There are a few compromises to consider, though.

Read: The best 5G phones you can buy right now

The biggest cutback might be the 6.2-inch OLED screen, which lacks a high refresh rate compared to the 90Hz-toting Pixel 5. This might not be a dealbreaker for most, but those looking for a smoother, more responsive screen or upgrading from a phone with a high refresh rate panel already might be disappointed.

Other notable cutbacks include no wireless charging, no significant IP rating, a plastic back, and a slightly smaller battery  at 3,885mAh. Then again, the lack of a high refresh rate means that a small drop in battery size is understandable.

The Pixel 4a 5G will retail for $ 499, making it $ 200 cheaper than the Pixel 5. Is it worth splashing out that much more for the flagship? Well, that depends on what you want in a smartphone.

What are some good Google Pixel 5 alternatives?

Google Pixel 5 Google Store

Credit: Google

The Pixel 5 is a rather interesting proposition, packing upper mid-range power, a slightly cheaper price than current flagships, as well as premium features like an IP rating and wireless charging.

There are quite a few Pixel 5 alternatives though, but you’ll need to weigh up pricing, features, and regional availability when making a decision to buy one of them.

Here are some Pixel 5 alternatives you should consider:

  • Pixel 4a 5G ($ 499): The Pixel 4a 5G lacks features like water resistance, wireless charging, and a high refresh rate screen. But you’re getting 5G, the same processor, and that familiar stock Android. You’re also getting brisk updates by opting for this phone.
  • Apple iPhone 11 ($ 700): Don’t mind switching to iOS and can’t wait for the iPhone 12? Then the iPhone 11 might be for you. It packs a similar dual rear camera setup, plenty of power for smooth performance, water resistance, and wireless charging. There are a few features missing from the iPhone 11 though, such as 5G, a high refresh rate, OLED screen, and a fingerprint scanner.
  • OnePlus Nord (~$ 500): The OnePlus Nord is roughly $ 200 cheaper than the Pixel 5, but packs the same 5G processor, a 90Hz OLED screen, and a similar sized battery. It lacks wireless charging, water resistance, and stock Android, but delivers two selfie cameras (one for ultra-wide shots) and four rear cameras. We think two of these rear cameras are just there to increase the numbers, while the main and ultra-wide rear snappers aren’t exactly great. You can also pay up to $ 200 extra for the OnePlus 8 if you must have a OnePlus phone with top-end power, but the Nord delivers most of the overall experience anyway.
  • LG Velvet ($ 600): This might be one of the closest phones to the Pixel 5 in North America, aside from the Pixel 4a 5G. You’ve got a similar level of horsepower, 5G, a slightly bigger battery, and a similar price tag. The LG Velvet also sports an optional second screen case, wireless charging, water resistance and, unlike the Pixel 5, a headphone port. Just don’t expect fast updates, a high refresh rate, or class-leading photo quality.
  • Samsung Galaxy S20 FE (~$ 700): Samsung’s latest S20 series phone ups the ante over the Pixel 5 by bringing proper flagship power, a 120Hz OLED screen, a bigger battery, and a flexible triple rear camera combo. It also delivers wireless charging and IP68 water resistance, as well as three years of OS updates. Looking for a cheaper Samsung phone as a Pixel 5 alternative? The Galaxy A71 is $ 100 cheaper than the S20 FE and costs $ 100 less than the Pixel. You’re missing out on a high refresh rate screen, wireless charging, and water resistance.
  • Realme X50 Pro (€600): Realme dropped its first 5G flagship in the first half of 2020, and it still makes for a very attractive proposition. A powerful Snapdragon 865 chipset, 90Hz OLED screen, flexible quad rear cameras, and a 4,200mAh battery with 65W charging make for a great combo. Unfortunately it lacks wireless charging and an IP rating. Realme isn’t quite on Google or Samsung’s level when it comes to update commitments either.

Should you buy the Google Pixel 5 now or wait?

Google tends to launch its flagship phones a few months before all eyes turn to the next-generation of smartphones, but the Pixel 5 is somewhat different in that it’s not playing a traditional specs war. Instead, Google is banking on the combination of software, pricing, and a few welcome hardware upgrades elsewhere to make for a compelling proposition.

Google also has a habit of dropping prices in the months after launch. If you’re not in immediate need of a phone, it might be worth waiting a month or two.

You should also ask yourself whether a high refresh rate screen, IP rating, and wireless charging are must-have features in a phone. If so, you can definitely do worse than the Pixel 5 for $ 699. If these features aren’t important to you, the $ 499 Pixel 4a 5G might be up your alley instead.

Where to buy the Pixel 5

The Google Pixel 5 is available from the Google Store and via Google Fi. Other retailers that will offer it include Amazon, Best Buy, and Walmart.

Again, the Pixel 5 in the US is going for $ 699. Pricing in Europe is set at £599/€629.

Google Pixel 5 Google’s first 5G smartphone
The Google Pixel 5 may not be the high-end Pixel we were expecting, but it’s a pretty compelling mid-range option. Google is going back to basics with the Pixel 5, ditching higher-end features like face recognition and the quirky Motion Sense gestures.

Google Pixel 5 software and updates

The Google Pixel 5 continues the Google tradition of timely software updates. Those worried about Android version updates and security patches should have peace of mind here. Google also commits to three years of Android system updates and security patches for its Pixel phones, and the Pixel 5 is no exception. This puts it in a very exclusive club, with only Samsung and occasionally OnePlus offering a similar level of support.

The company has also started issuing Pixel “feature drops”, which are Pixel and Google app updates rolled into one quarterly update for Pixel phones. Or at least it’s intended to be a quarterly release. For example, the March 2020 feature drop delivered dark mode scheduling, new Motion Sense gestures on the Pixel 4, new emoji, and Rules functionality.

The Pixel 5 ships with Android 11 and is expected to get Android 12 in 2021 and Android 13 in 2022.

Top Pixel 5 questions and answers

Q: Where’s the Google Pixel 5 XL?

A: There isn’t a Pixel 5 XL unfortunately, with the Pixel 4 XL or the Pixel 4a 5G being your next best bets if you want a bigger Pixel.

Q: What kind of 5G networks are supported?

A: The Pixel 5 supports both mmWave and sub-6GHz 5G networks.

Q: Does the Pixel 5 have a headphone jack?

A: No, the Pixel 5 doesn’t offer a headphone jack. Thankfully, this option is available on the 4a series.

Q: Does the Pixel 5 has a microSD card slot?

A: Unfortunately, there’s no microSD expansion here. At least you get 128GB of base storage.

Q: What colors are the Pixel 5 available in?

A: The Pixel 5 will be available in green and black.

Q: Is the Pixel 5 waterproof?

A: The phone has an IP68 rating for water and dust resistance, so it should theoretically survive a dunk in the pool just fine.

Q: Does the Pixel 5 have face unlock and Motion Sense gesture controls?

A: The Pixel 5 lacks both face unlock and gesture controls via Motion Sense hardware. At least you have a fingerprint scanner now.

Q: Does the Pixel 5 support wireless charging?

A: Yes, the phone supports wireless charging up to 12W with a Qi-certified EPP charger.

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Despite disappointing Pixel 4, 2019 was Google’s best year for phone sales yet


Google Pixelbook Go Review closed with Pixel 4

  • A third-party analyst firm says Google Pixel sales hit 7.2 million in 2019.
  • This would make it the best year yet for the Pixel line, although that number pales in comparison to the top-five brands.
  • It’s very likely sales of the Google Pixel 3a make up the bulk of that 7.2 million figure.

A few weeks ago, news broke that Google was allegedly disappointed with the Google Pixel 4, even prior to that device’s launch. However disappointing it may have been, it doesn’t appear to have stopped Google Pixel sales from hitting a record high in 2019.

According to third-party analyst firm International Data Corporation (IDC), Google Pixel sales hit 7.2 million units in 2019. Although the numbers don’t get broken down by device, it’s likely most of those sales come from the two 2019 phones launched — the Google Pixel 3a and Google Pixel 4. At least some of the shipments are probably made up of Google Pixel 3 sales, too.

However, it’s estimated that the Google Pixel 4 only sold around 2 million units over its first six months, which would mean a portion of that number wouldn’t count towards the 2019 total. Therefore, it’s basically a guarantee that the bulk of the Google Pixel sales in 2019 came from the Pixel 3a line.

Google Pixel sales likely dominated by the Pixel 3a

The budget-oriented Pixel 3a line was a big hit critically, so it likely being the best-selling phone in the line would make a lot of sense. The series is also easily accessible from many major carriers around the world and is available in India, the world’s second-largest smartphone market. The Pixel 4 is not available in India, which likely didn’t help its sales.

Related: Google Pixel 3a review: The phone made for everyone

While 7.2 million Google Pixel sales might be great for Google when compared to its previous years, it should be noted that it pales in comparison to the top-five manufacturers. Huawei, the second-largest smartphone OEM in the world, shipped 230 million phones in 2019, to give you an idea of Google’s market share.

However, the apparent success of the Pixel 3a gives more credence to the rumor that Google’s Pixel 5 phone will be a more mid-range affair with a weaker processor but a cheaper entry price. This news also makes us even more excited than we already are for the Google Pixel 4a, which still does not have a confirmed release date.

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This is the Google Pixel 4a: Punch-hole display, headphone jack, and a single camera


Google’s most successful Pixel to date is getting a sequel in 2020, and today we’re getting a first look.

Leaker Steve Hemmerstoffer (known online as OnLeaks) and 91Mobiles just published renders showing the Google Pixel 4a, expected sometime in the next few months.

As with other leaks from Hemmerstoffer, these images are renders built from CAD schematics of the device. Hemmerstoffer has an impressive track record, having published dozens of accurate leaks of high-profile devices over the past few years. That said, there’s always a chance that some details of the renders turn out to be inaccurate, so take them with the usual grain of salt.

So what’s interesting about these first Google Pixel 4a renders?

google pixel 4a leak renders 1

For one, the Pixel 4a will feature a punch-hole selfie camera in the upper left corner of the screen. That’s a first for Pixel devices – the Pixel 4 and 4 XL feature large top bezels, while the previous generation came with a sizeable notch.

google pixel 4a leak renders 5

Next, it appears that the Pixel 4a does not feature the Pixel 4’s Soli radar sensors – the top notch seems much narrower than on the Pixel 4, leaving no room for the necessary sensors.

The Pixel 4a features a rear-mounted fingerprint sensor, further suggesting that the phone will lack a 3D facial scanner. The loss of Soli should come as no surprise considering the gesture control system is disabled in some countries, including India, due to spectrum utilization restrictions.

google pixel 4a leak renders 8

Another interesting feature is the headphone jack on the top – like the Pixel 3a before it, the Pixel 4a will retain this increasingly rare functionality.

google pixel 4a leak renders 6

The Pixel 4a’s design is very similar to the Pixel 4, down to the shape of the camera module. However, the camera houses only one lens, which is pretty surprising, even for a device from Google. You can get amazing pictures with just one camera – the Pixel 3a is living proof – but dual- and triple-camera setups are so common that you’d be hard pressed to find a device with a single camera. Google continues to march to its own drum, for better or worse.

According to 91Mobiles’ report, the Pixel 4a’s screen will be 5.7-inch or 5.8-inch across. Thanks to the smaller bezels, the phone is said to be actually more compact than the Pixel 3a, at 144.2 x 69.5 x 8.2mm.

Also read: 5 additions and tweaks we’d like to see from Google Pixel 4a

These are all the details included in the report, but we can make some educated guesses about the Pixel 4a (and 4a XL). Judging from the specifications of the Pixel 3a, the 4a will be a solid, if not impressive performer. The camera will be similar to the Pixel 4’s, offering the same software features including Astrophotography. Hopefully, the battery will be beefier than the 3,000mAh unit found on this year’s model. As for the price, we don’t foresee any major changes – the Pixel 3a and 3a XL cost $ 399 and $ 479 respectively, and their successors are likely to be offered around the same price. Google could release the Pixel 4a a bit earlier than last year, though we can’t rule out another Google I/O launch. In the latter case, the Pixel 4a could be launched in mid-May 2020.

Likely Google Pixel 4a specs and features

  • Leaked so far:
    • 5.7-inch or 5.8-inch display
    • punch-hole selfie camera
    • 144.2 x 69.5 x 8.2mm (9mm including camera bump)
    • headphone jack
    • USB Type-C
    • fingerprint scanner (rear mounted)
    • single camera
  •  Our guesses
    • Plastic body
    • 1080 x 2160 resolution, OLED, Asahi Dragontrail glass
    • Qualcomm Snapdragon 765
    • 4GB of RAM
    • 64GB of storage
    • 12.2MP main camera, 8MP selfie camera
    • 3,000-3,200mAh

What do you think of these renders?

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Buy a Pixel if you want timely updates… Oh wait.


google pixel 4 xl security patch

Opinion post by
Bogdan Petrovan

Two things that happened the other day got me thinking about the strange situation Pixel users have found themselves in.

First, Samsung released a new Android 10 beta for the Galaxy S9 that includes the January 2020 security patch. It wouldn’t be the first time a company pushes out next month’s patch in advance, but it’s pretty striking nevertheless.

Second, I wrote a quick post about the Pixel 3a selling for $ 360 on Amazon. As I was writing it, I almost mechanically wanted to say that Pixel phones come with the “guarantee” of fast updates. Then I remembered that some Pixel 4 users are still stuck on the October security patch. I replaced “guarantee” with “promise,” though frankly this promise looks more like an ill-defined aspiration, than a serious pledge.

A quick check of Reddit, Twitter, and the comment sections of Android websites will surface dozens of examples of Pixel users stuck on outdated security patches, wondering what happened to the promise of quick updates.

It doesn’t help that Google just announced the first Feature Drop for the Pixel 4, and that, you guessed it, many Pixel 4 users still haven’t got that either.

This redditor posting on r/GooglePixel sums it up pretty well:

Has anyone else not gotten the “Feature Drop” from December? I’m kind of disheartened that it’s taking so long as this is one of the reasons I buy pixels.

I am not going to harp on the potential reasons why Google has delayed the November patch or the December patch, or why the promised Feature Drop is still a no-show for some. Technology is complicated, and these things are sometimes unavoidable.

It’s harder to pardon Google’s lack of communication on the matter — or the fact that the infamous “check update” button, which was supposed to trigger an update to the latest OTA, is still not working as promised. The feature was first announced in September 2017 for Android 8 Oreo and despite being initially bugged, a fix was rolled out in early 2018. Not so much, apparently.

For what is worth, the update issues appear to affect a minority of users. I got both the December patch and last week’s Feature Drop on my own Pixel 4 XL, as did two of my colleagues. Your mileage may vary.

Google is damaging one of the areas where it actually has a stellar reputation as a smartphone maker.

This particular issue may come and go, but the damage to Google’s reputation may be lasting. I already wrote extensively about Google’s reputation, and how it’s becoming one of its biggest problems. With these missing Pixel 4 updates, Google is damaging one of the areas where it actually has a stellar reputation as a smartphone maker.

The solid update policy has always been one of the reasons we’ve recommended Pixel phones, and Nexus devices before it. In a sea of mediocre efforts, Pixels stood out as the only credible Android counterpart to iPhones, which offer both faster updates and longer update periods.

How can we at Android Authority — or any other tech media — still say in good faith that buying a Google Pixel will get you fast updates? It’s definitely becoming difficult for me personally.

The Pixel 4 stands out in precious few ways — I love the design, the camera quality is still great (with some qualifiers), and it offers some amazing software features, like Astrophotography mode and Recorder. Are timely updates still a selling point? Arguably, yes, for now, as long as the delays don’t become constant. Also, as long as the promised Feature Drops actually come on time; it’s one thing to wait out for a security patch, another to miss out on cool new features.

Smartphones in 2020: 20 things we want to see from phone makers

Ironically, Google has worked hard to improve updates across the Android ecosystem. The rollout of new Android versions is accelerating, and more companies now offer monthly security patches, early betas and fairly timely system updates. OnePlus stands out as a great example, but even former laggards like Samsung and Huawei have improved their game dramatically compared to a few years ago. Google needs to do better to stand out against this background.

I admit I’m holding Google to a very high standard here — perhaps an unattainable one. But that’s the whole point, no? The Pixel line is supposed to lead by example. And what example is Google giving here?

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Older Pixel phones get Pixel 4 features and third-party launcher gestures


Google Pixel 3a front and Pixel 3a XL back

Google rolled out the latest Android security patch today. As usual, along with the security patch, the update also brought in some new features for Pixel devices, including a much-awaited feature: gesture navigation support on third-party launchers (via 9to5Google).

This means you can now choose from any number of launchers on the Google Play Store and still use Google’s new gesture navigation system. This includes swiping in from either bottom corner of the display to activate Google Assistant.

Curiously, the new feature comes to every device in the Pixel line except for the Google Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL. The reason those devices don’t have the feature is that, for whatever reason, the update hasn’t rolled out for those two devices as of yet. However, every other Pixel device — including the OG Pixel and Pixel XL — should have gesture navigation support on third-party launchers now.

Related: December 2019 Android security patch is here, final update for OG Pixel included

For now, anyway, Pixel 4 users will be stuck using the Pixel Launcher if they want to use gesture navigation.

Additionally, the new update also brings some Pixel 4-exclusive features to older devices. These include Pixel Themes, clipboard suggestions, and Google’s Live Caption tool.

Finally, if you are using the Pixel Launcher you can now swipe down from anywhere on the home screen to pull down the navigation shade. This will be a welcome update when it lands on the Pixel 4, as users can’t easily drop down the shade since that device has no fingerprint sensor.

We’ll keep you posted as soon as the update lands for Pixel 4 devices. In the meantime, click here to get it on all other Pixels.

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Android 10 update breaks Google Pixel 2 Wi-Fi for many users


Google released the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL just over two years ago. The company has since updated the devices with each new iteration of Android since. Unfortunately, the platform’s most recent update, Android 10, seems to break Wi-Fi functionality on many Pixel 2 devices.

Thanks to a tip from Android Authority reader LW Rozanski, we’ve been notified of a Google support thread where hundreds of users are claiming Android’s latest update renders Wi-Fi nearly useless on their devices. Interestingly, though, it seems no two cases are the same.

Some users claim their devices can connect to Wi-Fi networks, but internet access is not available. Others say Wi-Fi connectivity will drop sporadically. Some also claim that even their devices’ Bluetooth functionality is inconsistent and unreliable after receiving the Android 10 update.

Related: Google confirms that Pixel 2 camera won’t get Top Shot feature

Google has yet to formally address the issue at large, though some users have received replacement devices running Android 9. This is not a proper solution since many devices could still suffer the same problems if and when users upgrade them to Android 10.

So far, the only potential fix is to factory reset the device, and even that isn’t guaranteed. And even if it was, users shouldn’t be required to reset their devices just to reclaim its basic functionality.

Fortunately, we have not had this Wi-Fi issue on any of our Pixel 2 devices after receiving the Android 10 update, so we cannot replicate the problem. But what about you? Have you had any of these issues with your devices, and have you had any luck sorting them out? Let us know in the comments below.

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The best Google Pixel 3 XL cases you can get


The Google Pixel 3 XL offers 2018 hardware, but it’s more than enough to enjoy a great smartphone experience in 2019. The big selling point of Google’s smartphone though is a slew of camera features that improve on the already fantastic camera of its predecessor. Keeping your phone safe from accidental bumps and drops is always important. To help you out, we’ve rounded up some of the best Google Pixel 3 XL cases you can get right now.

The best Pixel 3 XL cases:

Editor’s note: We will continue to update this list of the best cases for the Pixel 3 XL as more become available.


1. Spigen Rugged Armor

spigen rugged armor - best pixel 3 xl case

The Spigen Rugged Armor is one of the best Pixel 3 XL cases you can buy. It offers excellent protection without adding too much bulk or thickness by utilizing air cushion technology and a spider-web pattern on the inside for shock dispersion. A raised lip keeps the display, camera, and fingerprint scanner safe and you also get covered buttons.


2. Pixel 3 XL MNML Case

Promoted

pixel 3 xl mnml mask

Looking for a thin Pixel 3 XL case? There is no thinner case than the MNML case at just 0.35 mm thick. It’s so thin that it will look and feel like you have no case at all. It doesn’t offer much drop protection, but it will protect you from the day-to-day scratches that can accumulate. The case comes in 5 different colors, including frosted black, frosted white, matte black, really blue, and red, and it’s on sale for $ 27. Get 15% off with code: 15PX3 only at MNMLCase.com


3. Caseology Waterfall

caseology waterfall transparent acrylic case

The Caseology Waterfall is a thin acrylic case that barely adds any bulk to the phone but offers military-grade protection. It’s also transparent and lets you show off the phone’s design. Covered buttons, reinforced corners, and a raised lip around the display and rear camera add to the protection as well. It’s also thin enough to let you wirelessly charge the device.


4. Supcase Unicorn Beetle Style

supcase unicorn beetle style hybrid bumper case

The Supcase Unicorn Beetle Style combines a hard polycarbonate back and a thick TPU bumper for drop protection. The scratch-resistant backing is also transparent and lets you show off the phone’s design. Elevated bezels keep the display and rear camera damage-free. You also get covered buttons and precise cutouts for everything else.


5. Ringke Fusion-X

ringke fusion-x

The Ringke Fusion-X comes with a dual-layer design that combines a hard polycarbonate shell and a thick bumper to offer MIL-STD 810G-516.6 grade protection. A raised lip keeps the display and the rear camera safe, while the sides and corners are reinforced for added drop protection. You also get a built-in lanyard hole to connect wrist and neck-straps.


6. Tudia Merge

tudia merge dual layer pixel 3 xl case

The Tudia Merge offers rugged protection for the Pixel 3 XL with its dual-layer design. It combines a soft, shock-absorbing TPU layer and a hard polycarbonate shell for all-round coverage. Precise cutouts are available and while you have covered buttons, they are easy to press. Raised bezels keep the screen and the rear camera free from scratches as well.


7. ESR metal kickstand case

esr tpu case with sturdy metal kickstand

If you’re looking for a case that isn’t bulky but still offers the convenience of a built-in kickstand, this ESR case is for you. The flexible TPU case comes with a raised lip and reinforced corners. The metal kickstand is sturdy and lets you prop up the phone in both landscape and portrait orientations, and also allows you to change the viewing angle.


8. Spigen Tough Armor

spigen tough armor rugged protection

The Spigen Tough Armor offers dual-layer protection with the combination of a soft TPU core and a hard polycarbonate shell. It’s one of the best rugged cases for the Pixel 3 XL you can get, coming with a MIL-STD 810G-516.6 certification for drop protection. The case also has a built-in kickstand that lets you prop the phone up in the landscape orientation.


9. Supcase Unicorn Beetle Pro

supcase unicorn beetle pro

The Supcase Unicorn Beetle Pro is a popular option for those looking for rugged cases. The multi-layered TPU and polycarbonate case does a great job of keeping the phone safe from accidental bumps and drops. A built-in screen protector ensures that the screen stays protected as well. The built-in kickstand lets you prop the phone up in both portrait and landscape, and it also comes with a detachable belt clip holster.


10. Otterbox Defender

otterbox defender heavy duty pixel 3 xl case

Otterbox is usually the go-to for anyone looking for a rugged case for their phone and the Defender series provides the most protection. It’s thick and bulky, with covered buttons and ports, and has a raised lip to keep the display safe. The Otterbox Defender also comes with a belt clip holster. This rugged case is expensive and will be overkill for some. If complete protection is what you want though, that’s what you get.


There you have it for this roundup of the best protective cases and covers currently available for the Google Pixel 3 XL!

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Android 10 gesture navigation now works with third-party launchers on Pixel 4


Google has fixed gesture navigation issues with third-party launchers in Android 10.

One of the most annoying things about Android 10 was that its new gesture navigation system wasn’t supported in third-party launchers. That’s a big problem, because it effectively meant that you were stuck with whatever launcher your manufacturer installed if you wanted Google’s take on gestures.

Fortunately, Google has fixed this issue with the Pixel 4, Android Police reports, although the fix doesn’t seem to apply to other Android 10-toting devices right now. In fact, the outlet reports that gesture navigation with third-party launchers is still a no-go on the Pixel 3 running Android 10.

The fix also means you can now use the new Google Assistant in conjunction with a third-party launcher on the Pixel 4 (the new voice assistant reportedly requires gesture navigation).

This is a step in the right direction for Google, and hopefully the fix comes to all Android 10 devices in the coming weeks and months. After all, the likes of Nova Launcher, Action Launcher, and Microsoft Launcher are some of the most prominent and handy launcher apps around.

Tired of your preinstalled launcher? Then you can check out our list of great Android launchers over here.

More posts about Android 10


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

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YXR1cmVkX2NhdGVnb3J5IjtzOjc6IkFuZHJvaWQiO3M6MTY6Indvb19mZWF0X2VudHJpZXMiO3M6MToiMyI7czoyNzoid29vX3NsaWRlcl9tYWdhemluZV9leGNsdWRlIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTY6Indvb19zbGlkZXJfc2ZhZGUiO3M6NToiZmFsc2UiO3M6MTY6Indvb19zbGlkZXJfY2ZhZGUiO3M6NToiZmFsc2UiO3M6MTY6Indvb19zbGlkZXJfc3BlZWQiO3M6MzoiMC42IjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fc2xpZGVyX3RpbWVvdXQiO3M6MToiNiI7czoyNDoid29vX3NsaWRlcl9jb250ZW50X3NwZWVkIjtzOjM6IjAuNiI7czoxOToid29vX2Nhcm91c2VsX2hlaWdodCI7czozOiIyOTIiO3M6ODoid29vX2hvbWUiO3M6NToiZmFsc2UiO3M6MTY6Indvb19ibG9nX2V4Y2VycHQiO3M6NDoidHJ1ZSI7czoxOToid29vX2FyY2hpdmVfZXhjZXJwdCI7czo0OiJ0cnVlIjtzOjEwOiJ3b29fYXV0aG9yIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTQ6Indvb19zaG93X3ZpZGVvIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTc6Indvb19leGNsdWRlX3ZpZGVvIjtzOjU6ImZhbHNlIjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fdmlkZW9fY2F0ZWdvcnkiO3M6NjoiVmlkZW9zIjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fd3B0aHVtYl9ub3RpY2UiO3M6MDoiIjtzOjIyOiJ3b29fcG9zdF9pbWFnZV9zdXBwb3J0IjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTQ6Indvb19waXNfcmVzaXplIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTc6Indvb19waXNfaGFyZF9jcm9wIjtzOjQ6InRydWUiO3M6MTA6Indvb19yZXNpemUiO3M6NDoidHJ1ZSI7czoxMjoid29vX2F1dG9faW1nIjtzOjU6ImZhbHNlIjtzOjIwOiJ3b29faG9tZV90aHVtYl93aWR0aCI7czozOiIxMDAiO3M6MjE6Indvb19ob21lX3RodW1iX2hlaWdodCI7czoyOiI1NyI7czoxNToid29vX3RodW1iX3dpZHRoIjtzOjM6IjEwMCI7czoxNjoid29vX3RodW1iX2hlaWdodCI7czoyOiI1NyI7czoxNjoid29vX2ltYWdlX3NpbmdsZSI7czo1OiJmYWxzZSI7czoxNjoid29vX3NpbmdsZV93aWR0aCI7czozOiIyNTAiO3M6MTc6Indvb19zaW5nbGVfaGVpZ2h0IjtzOjM6IjE4MCI7czoxMzoid29vX3Jzc190aHVtYiI7czo1OiJmYWxzZSI7czoxODoid29vX2FkX3RvcF9kaXNhYmxlIjtzOjU6ImZhbHNlIjtzOjE4OiJ3b29fYWRfdG9wX2Fkc2Vuc2UiO3M6MzEzOiI8c2NyaXB0IHR5cGU9InRleHQvamF2YXNjcmlwdCI+PCEtLQ0KZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2NsaWVudCA9ICJjYS1wdWItMTM5NjAzNTE3OTk0ODI2OSI7DQovKiA0Njh4NjBhbmRyb2lkem9vbmUgKi8NCmdvb2dsZV9hZF9zbG90ID0gIjE5MzU4MDg2NzciOw0KZ29vZ2xlX2FkX3dpZHRoID0gNDY4Ow0KZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2hlaWdodCA9IDYwOw0KLy8tLT4NCjwvc2NyaXB0Pg0KPHNjcmlwdCB0eXBlPSJ0ZXh0L2phdmFzY3JpcHQiDQpzcmM9Imh0dHA6Ly9wYWdlYWQyLmdvb2dsZXN5bmRpY2F0aW9uLmNvbS9wYWdlYWQvc2hvd19hZHMuanMiPg0KPC9zY3JpcHQ+IjtzOjE2OiJ3b29fYWRfdG9wX2ltYWdlIjtzOjQwOiJodHRwOi8vd3d3Lndvb3RoZW1lcy5jb20vYWRzLzQ2OHg2MGEuanBnIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfdG9wX3VybCI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRzX3JvdGF0ZSI7czo0OiJ0cnVlIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfMSI7czo0MToiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL2Fkcy8xMjV4MTI1YS5qcGciO3M6MTI6Indvb19hZF91cmxfMSI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfMiI7czo0MToiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL2Fkcy8xMjV4MTI1Yi5qcGciO3M6MTI6Indvb19hZF91cmxfMiI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfMyI7czo0MToiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL2Fkcy8xMjV4MTI1Yy5qcGciO3M6MTI6Indvb19hZF91cmxfMyI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjtzOjE0OiJ3b29fYWRfaW1hZ2VfNCI7czo0MToiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tL2Fkcy8xMjV4MTI1ZC5qcGciO3M6MTI6Indvb19hZF91cmxfNCI7czoyNDoiaHR0cDovL3d3dy53b290aGVtZXMuY29tIjt9PC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fcGlzX2hhcmRfY3JvcDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19waXNfcmVzaXplPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gdHJ1ZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3Bvc3RfaW1hZ2Vfc3VwcG9ydDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19yZXNpemU8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSB0cnVlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fcnNzX3RodW1iPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gZmFsc2U8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19zaG9ydG5hbWU8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSB3b288L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19zaG93X2Nhcm91c2VsPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gdHJ1ZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3Nob3dfdmlkZW88L3N0cm9uZz4gLSB0cnVlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fc2luZ2xlX2hlaWdodDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDE4MDwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3NpbmdsZV93aWR0aDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDI1MDwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3NsaWRlcl9jZmFkZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGZhbHNlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fc2xpZGVyX2NvbnRlbnRfc3BlZWQ8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSAwLjY8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19zbGlkZXJfbWFnYXppbmVfZXhjbHVkZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIHRydWU8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb19zbGlkZXJfc2ZhZGU8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBmYWxzZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3NsaWRlcl9zcGVlZDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDAuNjwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3NsaWRlcl90aW1lb3V0PC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gNjwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3RhYnM8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSBmYWxzZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3RleHR0aXRsZTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIGZhbHNlPC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fdGhlbWVuYW1lPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gR2F6ZXR0ZTwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3RodW1iX2hlaWdodDwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIDU3PC9saT48bGk+PHN0cm9uZz53b29fdGh1bWJfd2lkdGg8L3N0cm9uZz4gLSAxMDA8L2xpPjxsaT48c3Ryb25nPndvb192aWRlb19jYXRlZ29yeTwvc3Ryb25nPiAtIFZpZGVvczwvbGk+PGxpPjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3dwdGh1bWJfbm90aWNlPC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gPC9saT48L3VsPg==