Tag Archive | "phone"

Who wants a phone with 5G, 90Hz display, and a big battery for $215? (Update)


realme v5 5g render

Credit: Realme

Update, August 4, 2020 (4AM ET): According to XDA-Developers citing a Realme spokesperson, the V series will also go on sale in most of Realme’s international markets, including Europe, at some point this year. This includes the Realme V5.

While there’s no pricing info for the phone just yet, a direct conversion from its Chinese price suggests a tag of around €180 in Europe. However, European pricing for phones is generally higher than Chinese prices.

Original article, August 3, 2020 (6:40 AM ET): The Realme V5 5G is now official in China, and with its introduction drops the price of 5G access to below the $ 250 mark.

The affordable phone adds bulk to the company’s previous device launches in 2020, like the X50 Pro and the X3 SuperZoom. But unlike this duo, the Realme V5 isn’t meant to be a flagship killer, unless you’re only buying flagships for 5G connectivity.

Aesthetically, it’s nothing we haven’t seen before this year. You’re looking at a punch-hole selfie camera with a shimmering rear plate and a large rectangular camera array in its top-left corner. The silver version also gets that now customary ‘Realme’ print at the rear of the device, although the branding is comically huge here.

See also: The best budget phones you can currently buy

Other on-trend features also make the list. The Realme V5 5G sports a 6.5-inch IPS display with 2,400 x 1,080 resolution and a 90Hz refresh rate. Buyers also get a quad-camera array at the rear, headlined by a 48MP primary camera. Joining it is an 8MP ultrawide, a 2MP macro snapper, and a 2MP depth sensor. A 16MP sensor is used for the selfie camera.

Under the Realme V5’s skin lies the Mediatek Dimensity 720 chipset which gives the phone sub-6GHz 5G support and eight CPU cores to play around with. The chip isn’t as powerful as the Dimensity 820, but does allow Realme to add 5G support at a lower cost. A 5,000mAh battery keeps the lights on and can be topped up using Realme’s 30W SuperDart charging.

The Realme V5 will be offered with either 6GB or 8GB RAM, but 128GB of UFS 2.1 storage is the only storage option. There’s also a microSD card slot to boost that figure though.

Other creature comforts include a 3.5mm headphone jack, support for Wi-Fi 5, Bluetooth 5.0, and dual SIM slots. The device runs on Android 10 with Realme UI on top.

Realme V5 5G price and availability

The Realme V5 5G will go on sale in China on August 7 starting at 1,499 yuan (~$ 215) for the 6GB RAM model. The 8GB RAM option is 1,899 yuan (~$ 270). That’s an awful lot more to pay for just a bit more RAM.

As for the colorways, buyers get a choice of silver, green, and blue.

No pricing or availability info beyond China has been announced just yet, but the V5 could kick off a fierce affordable 5G phone battle if it’s ever launched internationally.

Next: The best 5G phones you can buy right now


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Your regular reminder: More phone cameras does not equal better quality photos


The Redmi Note 8T offers more cameras, including a macro camera.

Credit: Nick Fernandez / Android Authority

Opinion post by
Hadlee Simons

It seems like just the other day that LG launched the V40 with its main-telephoto-ultrawide triple rear camera setup that would eventually form the backbone of many a premium phone’s photography suite.

The smartphone world has gone even further since then though, with brands pushing the number to four or in some ill-advised cases as many as five cameras.

Everyone from Huawei and Samsung to Xiaomi and OnePlus seem to be hopping on this trend of adding more and more cameras, but it’s worth stressing once again that increasing the number of cameras does not guarantee better picture quality — and manufacturers certainly know this.

These brands nevertheless choose this approach because it’s a cheap marketing trick to use in their promotional materials. Whether it’s the recent Xiaomi Redmi Note entries, Realme‘s budget phones, Samsung’s Galaxy A family, or Huawei’s mid-range phones, there are loads of examples of devices with unnecessary extra cameras that seem to be there simply to pad the numbers.

Related: The best Android camera phones you can buy

Quantity =/= quality

Samsung Galaxy A51 rear camera macro

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

Macro cameras and depth sensors are two of the most popular extra cameras and, excuse me if this sounds obvious but… they don’t magically add up to deliver a better overall photo. The addition of these cameras have almost nothing to do with the actual picture quality when shooting a standard photo via the main camera. In fact, the biggest contributing factor to better image quality is the main camera hardware and a brand’s image processing software.

Whether it’s the introduction of a better main image sensor, optical image stabilization to reduce blur, or better camera software, all of these additions actually have an impact on overall picture quality. So why add these particular cameras in the first place then?

Read: What is macro photography?

A depth camera might be handy for portrait mode and depth of field effects, but it’s only contributing depth data to the main camera. Many brands these days are able to gather depth data via software algorithms or other, more useful cameras.

Meanwhile, macro cameras are used for taking close-up shots, but today’s brands are largely using token 2MP sensors (e.g. OnePlus 8 and many budget phones) that don’t offer much detail at all.

So clearly most brands seem to be using depth sensors and macro cameras to make up the numbers rather than as part of a concerted effort to actually deliver better image quality. But there are extra cameras worth having on a phone though, either offering a wildly different perspective or improving overall image quality.

When more cameras are welcome

Xiaomi Mi Note 10 back of the phone

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

One of the more common additions these days is the ultra-wide camera, taking snaps that are wider than a typical main camera. This is ideal for buildings, landscapes, group photos, and other situations where you want to cram as much as possible into the frame. Many ultra-wide cameras are also capable of taking macro shots too, and at a higher resolution than those sketchy 2MP macro sensors. Ultra-wide cameras are available on everything from the low-end Samsung Galaxy A11 to high-end phones like the Galaxy S20 series and iPhone 11 family.

Zoom cameras such as periscope or telephoto lenses are another truly handy addition too. These cameras offer much better zoom quality than phones relying on digital zoom alone. These cameras allow you to get Instagram-worthy images from afar rather than a blurry mess. Examples of phones with zoom-enabled cameras include recent Huawei flagships, the OnePlus 7T, and Samsung’s recent flagships.

We’ve even seen the likes of Huawei, Oppo, and Xiaomi offer two zoom cameras on a phone, with one being for short-range zoom (2x to 3x) and the other handling long-range zoom (5x or 10x). This way, image degradation is kept to a minimum across a variety of zoom factors. Phones with two zoom cameras include the Xiaomi Mi Note 10 and Huawei P40 Pro Plus.

When it comes to cameras, quality is more important than quantity.

Some older phones like the Huawei P20 series and Nokia 8 offer monochrome cameras as secondary sensors too. This type of camera can have a direct impact on overall image quality (especially at night), as it can gather more light than a traditional camera sensor. It can also be used for true monochrome shots and to gather depth information as well.

So why don’t more brands adopt these useful cameras then? Well, at least one manufacturer told us that macro cameras were considerably cheaper to implement than something like a telephoto lens. Furthermore, most brands already offer ultrawide cameras as the secondary shooter. As for monochrome cameras, they have fallen out of favor in recent times as brands use computational photography smarts or RYYB camera sensors to improve low-light picture quality instead.

Better extra cameras or none at all

Redmi Note 9 Pro in hand with camera

Credit: Dhruv Bhutani / Android Authority

It’s time for manufacturers to either bring truly useful extra cameras to the table or to ditch them completely. Sure, the average consumer might be swayed by fancy “quad-camera” marketing at first, but what happens when the user realizes the extra cameras are pointless? What if the offending brand decides to launch a quad-camera phone with useful extra cameras down the line? It has the potential to turn into a “boy who cried wolf” situation.

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Instead, the money that would’ve been spent on a depth sensor or macro camera can go towards improving the main camera. Whether it’s by implementing a better sensor, optical image stabilization, or improved software, this would all have a more meaningful impact on photo quality. We’d even be happy to see brands taking the cash that would’ve been spent on a depth sensor or macro camera and spending it on improving ultra-wide cameras and selfie snappers too.

So the next time you see a smartphone manufacturer boasting about having a quad-camera phone, just remember that it’s likely a case of quantity over quality.

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Despite disappointing Pixel 4, 2019 was Google’s best year for phone sales yet


Google Pixelbook Go Review closed with Pixel 4

  • A third-party analyst firm says Google Pixel sales hit 7.2 million in 2019.
  • This would make it the best year yet for the Pixel line, although that number pales in comparison to the top-five brands.
  • It’s very likely sales of the Google Pixel 3a make up the bulk of that 7.2 million figure.

A few weeks ago, news broke that Google was allegedly disappointed with the Google Pixel 4, even prior to that device’s launch. However disappointing it may have been, it doesn’t appear to have stopped Google Pixel sales from hitting a record high in 2019.

According to third-party analyst firm International Data Corporation (IDC), Google Pixel sales hit 7.2 million units in 2019. Although the numbers don’t get broken down by device, it’s likely most of those sales come from the two 2019 phones launched — the Google Pixel 3a and Google Pixel 4. At least some of the shipments are probably made up of Google Pixel 3 sales, too.

However, it’s estimated that the Google Pixel 4 only sold around 2 million units over its first six months, which would mean a portion of that number wouldn’t count towards the 2019 total. Therefore, it’s basically a guarantee that the bulk of the Google Pixel sales in 2019 came from the Pixel 3a line.

Google Pixel sales likely dominated by the Pixel 3a

The budget-oriented Pixel 3a line was a big hit critically, so it likely being the best-selling phone in the line would make a lot of sense. The series is also easily accessible from many major carriers around the world and is available in India, the world’s second-largest smartphone market. The Pixel 4 is not available in India, which likely didn’t help its sales.

Related: Google Pixel 3a review: The phone made for everyone

While 7.2 million Google Pixel sales might be great for Google when compared to its previous years, it should be noted that it pales in comparison to the top-five manufacturers. Huawei, the second-largest smartphone OEM in the world, shipped 230 million phones in 2019, to give you an idea of Google’s market share.

However, the apparent success of the Pixel 3a gives more credence to the rumor that Google’s Pixel 5 phone will be a more mid-range affair with a weaker processor but a cheaper entry price. This news also makes us even more excited than we already are for the Google Pixel 4a, which still does not have a confirmed release date.

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Redmi K30 Racing Edition goes official as first phone with Snapdragon 768G


Redmi K30 5 of 8

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

Xiaomi has launched a new phone in the Redmi K30 series. Called the Redmi K30 5G Racing Edition (although machine translation also calls it the Extreme or Speed Edition), it’s the first phone to feature Qualcomm’s upgraded Snapdragon 768G chipset.

The new 5G-enabled processor brings a slight performance increase over the existing Snapdragon 765 and 765G. It boosts the CPU clock speed from 2.4GHz to 2.8GHz. It also ups the performance of the Adreno 620 GPU by about 15%.

Elsewhere, the new Snapdragon 768G includes an integrated 5G modem, making the Redmi K30 Racing Edition compatible with dual mode SA/NSA 5G. The phone also gets 6GB of RAM and 128GB of storage.

Besides the upgraded silicon, the Redmi K30 5G Racing Edition gets the same 120Hz refresh rate as its predecessor. The display size is also the same at 6.67-inches. It has an FHD+ resolution (1080 x 2400 pixels) and a 20:9 aspect ratio.

What else to know about Redmi K30 variant?

There’s a vertically aligned quad camera setup at the back consisting of a 64MP Sony IMX686 primary camera, an 8MP ultra-wide camera, a 5MP macro camera, and a 2MP depth-of-field sensor. As you can see, the camera setup is pretty much the same as the Redmi K30 5G.

On the front of the Redmi K30 Racing Edition is a 20MP selfie shooter assisted by a 2MP depth sensor, both housed within punch holes on the right corner of the screen.

In terms of connectivity, the phone features a 3.5mm headphone jack as well as a USB-C port. In addition to 5G connectivity mentioned before, the phone also supports dual SIM compatibility, Bluetooth, NFC, an IR blaster, and GPS/ A-GPS.

The volume buttons rest on the right edge of the phone and the fingerprint sensor is integrated with the power button.

The entire package is powered by a 4,500mAh battery and there’s 30W fast charging onboard. There’s no wireless charging on the phone.

Redmi K30 Racing Edition: Price and availability

The new Snapdragon 768G phone has only launched in China for now. It is priced at 1,999 Chinese Yuan (~$ 282).


Overall, the new Redmi K30 Racing Edition isn’t at all different from the Redmi K30 5G. The only exception is its new Qualcomm chip, which should improve the overall performance of the phone and assist with a better gaming experience given its GPU boost.

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You can now wirelessly transfer files from your Samsung phone to Windows 10 PC


Microsoft your phone app on Samsung Galaxy Note 10Samsung

Microsoft’s Your Phone app is perhaps one of the most useful ones out there for people who use Android phones and Windows PCs. The app allows users to seamlessly access notifications, reply to text messages, as well as make and receive calls on their PCs.

Now, Samsung is extending its partnership with Microsoft to bring yet another useful feature to its phones. You can now drag and drop files from your Samsung phone to your Windows 10 PC, without having to hook up any wires.

The new file drag and drop feature requires a Samsung device running Link To Windows version 1.5 or higher. This means that most recent Galaxy phones and tablets like the Galaxy Note 9, Note 10, S9, S10, S20, and more will be able to make use of the feature. Here’s the complete list of Samsung devices that support Link to Windows.

Microsoft notes that the new file sharing system is currently available to its Windows Insider community, so we can expect it to roll out more widely pretty soon.

Types of supported files

The new drag and drop feature supports all kinds of file types apart from folders. However, you can only transfer up to 100 files at a time and no single file can be larger than 512MB in size.

You can currently drag files from your Samsung phone’s Gallery app or My Files app only. From your PC, you can drag and drop any file of your choice to the Samsung device.

How to drag and drop files from Samsung phones to Windows 10 PCs?

You will first need to download the Your Phone app on your Windows 10 PC. Once you’ve done that, follow the steps given below to transfer files from your Samsung phone to your PC.

  • Open Phone Screen in the Your Phone app on your PC
  • Navigate to a folder in the My Files section
  • Long press on the desired file until a checkmark appears
  • To transfer additional files, simply tap on them
  • Use your mouse to long-press again on the files you’ve selected and wait for a thumbnail to appear
  • Drag the files to your desired location on your PC
  • The cursor will change to show when you’re able to drop the files

If you’re transferring images from your phone’s Gallery app, follow the instructions given below.

  • Open Phone Screen in the Your Phone app on your PC
  • Navigate to Albums and select one
  • Long press on a photo until a checkmark appears
  • To transfer additional photos, simply tap on them
  • Drag and drop images the same way as mentioned above

Vice versa, if you want to copy files from your PC to your phone, follow these steps mentioned below.

  • Open Phone Screen in the Your Phone app on your PC
  • Select files from your PC that you’d like to transfer
  • Drag files to the Your Phone window
  • The cursor will change to say Copy and that’s when you can drop the files by releasing the mouse
  • Navigate to Internal Storage > Downloads folder to see your transferred files

Remember, minimizing the Your Phone app during the drag and drop process will cancel the transfer and you’ll have to start from scratch again.

Certain Samsung devices also support a text copy and paste function, as well as RCS Messaging though the Your Phone app. You can read all about it here.

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This is why Poco hasn’t launched a Snapdragon 865 or 855 phone yet


Poco X2 and logo in focus

Poco has officially launched its second smartphone to date and it’s not the Poco F2. You don’t get a flagship killer without a flagship chipset. Instead, we got the Poco X2 — at best a mid-range phone with some cool tricks up its sleeve. It comes with a 120Hz display and quad cameras under the $ 250 price tag, but it doesn’t really cut it if you were waiting for a Pocophone F1 successor.

We asked Poco’s general manager Manmohan Chandolu why that’s the case and one of the primary reasons he cited is a slight deviation in the traditional pricing structure of flagship chipsets. According to Chandolu, Poco — a company that calls itself a startup — did not find costs of Qualcomm’s 2019 and 2020 flagship SoCs feasible. Here’s what Poco says happened.

Our verdict: Poco X2 review: A perfectly average mid-range phone

A chip off the block

“Chipsets right now, all 800-series chipsets, are extremely expensive. And [the Snapdragon 865], being the first 5G generation, is just a lot more expensive,” the executive told Android Authority at the Poco X2 launch.

The face of Poco’s newly formed independent identity, Chandolu still swears by the Snapdragon 845 and believes it to be an extremely well-priced performance workhorse. “But 845 is not there in the market anymore,” he remarked.

While we would tend to agree with the Poco GM on the Snapdragon 845’s capabilities even almost a year after its launch, the question still remains: why didn’t Poco upgrade to the Snapdragon 865, or at least the 855?

Related: The Poco X2 isn’t the Pocophone you’ve been waiting for (and that’s okay)

“The Snapdragon 865, as I told you, is already very expensive and it does not make any sense,” Chandolu said, “Then what could we have considered? [The Snapdragon] 855. Right?”

He continues to tell us that the Snapdragon 855 did not see the same price depreciation as the company expected: “The 855 was launched with a little [sic] higher price point and we expected that also to undergo some depreciation. But 865 has launched extremely high and now the transition from 4G to 5G is happening across the board. So the depreciation the 855 should have seen [did not happen].”

That’s why, Poco claims, it chose the more affordable Snapdragon 730G octa-core chipset. Chandolu believes the Poco X2, like the F1, will still stay true to being a gaming-centric device even with a 700-series Qualcomm SoC at its heart.

Why does a higher processor cost matter?

Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 in hand front

It’s a well-known fact in the smartphone industry (and in basic economics) that higher processor costs directly impact the retail prices of phones.

In this instance, the Snapdragon 845 which powered the first Poco phone reportedly cost manufacturers somewhere around $ 45 plus additional licensing fee per chip. Its price was later reduced, as Chandolu tells us, but it’s no longer available in the market.

Related: How low will 5G smartphone prices go in 2020?

Then came the Snapdragon 855 and 855 Plus, which were reportedly priced around $ 53 per chip, in addition to some extra fee that Qualcomm is said to charge. Now, industry insiders believe that prices of 5G chipsets, like the Snapdragon 865, are likely 50% more than their 4G counterparts.

This will not only unnecessarily drive up the cost of upcoming flagship smartphones in markets where 5G is a non-factor, it will also prevent the likes of Poco from pulling off an affordable flagship-grade 5G phone at the original Pocophone F1’s price point of $ 300.

Is a cheap Pocophone F2 coming with a Snapdragon 865?

While Chandolu refused to confirm the existence of the Poco F2, unlike in a previous interview, he didn’t seem too optimistic about bringing a 5G-ready smartphone to the Indian market yet.

That’s because Poco is essentially an India-only brand as of now. It is not looking to expand its horizons internationally just yet. That, combined with the lack of any 5G network in the country right now or in the near future, would not serve Poco’s interests at the moment.

“It’s not just chipsets, right? We also want the infrastructure to be ready,” said Chandolu. “Again, what’s the point of having a chipset if the infrastructure is not available?”

“My worry with 5G right now is that it requires a lot of infrastructure costs, huge infrastructure costs, so I do not know how that will play. Probably closer to that [India getting the 5G infrastructure] we will probably take a look at our strategy and formulate our thoughts on it.”

For now, a powerful Poco flagship still seems unlikely to launch anytime soon… unless the company surprises us all by pulling a rabbit out of its hat for a second time.

The future of Poco

Poco X2 and back panel

In a nutshell, the new Poco brand doesn’t seem to have a clear chipset or pricing play in mind. Chandolu says that the brand will keep its strategy dynamic and is not really ready to set things in stone.

Poco also has a bunch of other factors to consider, including how much it can compete with its former parent company Xiaomi. This is especially problematic since both brands still share many of the same resources, right down to research and development. Then there’s the matter of Xiaomi bringing its premium Mi-branded phones to India, which Poco will need to carefully weigh in order to price its flagships competitively.

For now, however, we have the Poco X2, and the promise that the Poco brand is back and, this time around, is here to stay.

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Here’s why Xiaomi hasn’t delivered a 100W charging phone just yet


100 watt charging demonstration by Xiaomi.Weibo/Bin Lin

Xiaomi made waves almost a year ago when it revealed that it was working on 100W charging technology, capable of charging a 4,000mAh battery in 17 minutes. The company said Redmi phones would get the tech first, but we haven’t heard anything else since then.

Now, Redmi general manager Lu Weibing has taken to Weibo to reveal five technical difficulties associated with 100W charging (and fast charging in general).

Major battery degradation

Perhaps the biggest consideration is battery capacity, with the Redmi executive saying faster charging results in greater capacity loss. And this is a big issue when you’ve got 100W charging.

“According to preliminary estimates, the capacity of a 100W fast charge battery is about 20% less than that of a 30W PD fast charge. In short, 5,000mAh becomes 4,000mAh,” Lu said according to a machine-translated version of his post.

In other words, it seems like 100W charging requires a big battery right now in order to off-set the degradation. Otherwise, your 4,000mAh battery will eventually become a 3,200mAh battery due to charging-induced degradation.

This isn’t the only technical difficulty cited by the Redmi executive, as he also points to the technical architecture, charger compatibility, charging protections throughout the device (e.g. for battery, motherboard etc), and general performance as four other hurdles to overcome.

Nevertheless, the Xiaomi executive says 100W charging has “reached the early stage of mature production and can be expected in the future.” So it definitely sounds like we can still expect a 100W smartphone, but it will probably have a massive battery to fight off the effects of degradation.

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Looking for an affordable phone? Wait for Qualcomm’s new mid-range chipsets


Qualcomm Snapdragon 460 662 and 720G Mobile Platforms Chip Case

Following the launch of the flagship Snapdragon 865 and a series of high-performance, 5G options, Qualcomm is setting its sight at overhauling its entry-level and mid-range chipset portfolio.

At an event in New Delhi, India, the company announced a range of new SoCs that focus on improving connectivity, audio, and performance. Additionally, all three chipsets gain support for India’s homegrown NavIC GPS navigation constellation. Let’s take a closer look.

Snapdragon 460

The Snapdragon 460 represents a fairly big leap for entry-level smartphones. Qualcomm claims that the use of performance cores should help it gain a 70% leap in computing power. Meanwhile, the GPU from the 600 series of chipsets finds a place on the Snapdragon 460. This should have an impact for gamers on a budget since you’ll be able eke out a few more frames on more affordable phones.

Snapdragon 460

Elsewhere, the phone has a new Spectra 340 ISP which should allow for improved imaging. The Qualcomm Spectra 340 ISP enables up to a 25MP camera or dual 16MP modules. The configuration will let OEMs opt for a triple-camera set up as well but might have to compromise on the resolution.

Qualcomm claims that the chipset is WiFi 6 ready including support for FastConnect 6100 which is essentially a subset of features that are a part of Wi-Fi 6 compliance. It remains to be seen if the Snapdragon 460 series will spearhead the adoption of affordable Wi-Fi 6 enabled smartphones.

Snapdragon 662

While the Snapdragon 460 will service the entry-level segment, I fully expect the Snapdragon 662 to become a mainstay of the mid-range segment once devices equipped with it start shipping towards the end of the year.

Snapdragon 662

From a performance perspective, this is an octa-core chipset that pairs four Cortex A73 cores clocked at up to 2Ghz with four Cortex A53 cores that can run at up to 1.8GHz. This performance and efficiency combination is similar to what we’ve already seen on the Snapdragon 660. However, the 662 gains the better Adreno 610 GPU from the Snapdragon 665 to boost its gaming cred.

Bigger changes lie on the imaging front. The Spectra 340T ISP enables mainstays like a 48MP sensor, but also allows for HEIF capture which should go a long way in reducing file sizes of images. Additionally, the ISP allows for smooth switching between a triple camera setup to enable a camera-like user experience.

Connectivity is another area where Qualcomm has made large strides while working on the Snapdragon 662. Between Bluetooth 5.1, Qualcomm TrueWireless support, you can expect more reliable connectivity and longer range with next-gen wireless earbuds. The chipset is also Wi-Fi 6 ready, though we don’t know yet if this is just Fast Connect 6100 subset or full-blown Wi-Fi 6 support.

Snapdragon 720G

The Snapdragon 720G is positioned as a premium-tier chipset that should slot in right below the Snapdragon 730 that has found duty in phones like the Redmi K30.

Snapdragon 720G

Positioned as an upgrade from the Snapdragon 710 series, it employs dual clusters of two Cortex A76 cores paired with six Cortex A55 cores. Combined with an improved Adreno 618 GPU, users can expect a significant leap in day-to-day as well as gaming performance over the Snapdragon 712.

Imaging is one of the key focus areas for Qualcomm and the 720G gets a Spectra 350L ISP that enables image capture at up to 192MP as well as HEIF support. There are improvements in the AI engine as well that should improve reliability and speed of access for virtual assistants.

Connectivity too, gets a step up, with the adoption of the Fast Connect 6200 platform as well as Wi-Fi 6 support. In addition, Bluetooth 5.1 and TrueWireless Stereo support guarantee a reliable and latency-free connection with the latest generation of true wireless earphones.

  Snapdragon 720G Snapdragon 662 Snapdragon 460
CPU Kryo 465 octa-core
2x @ 2.3GHz (Cortex-A76)
6x @ 1.8GHz (Cortex-A55)
Kryo 260 octa-core
4x @ 2GHz (Cortex-A73)
4x @ 1.8GHz (Cortex-A53)
Kryo 240 octa-core
4x performance cores (TBC)
4x @ 1.8GHz (Cortex-A53)
GPU Adreno 618 Adreno 610 Adreno 610
DSP Hexagon 692 with Tensor Accelerator Hexagon 683 Hexagon 683
Camera Up to 192MP photo capture 48MP photo capture
Triple camera
25MP single/16MP dual
Modem Snapdragon X15 LTE

800Mbps down, 150Mbps up

Snapdragon X11 LTE

390Mbps down, 150Mbps up

Snapdragon X11 LTE

390Mbps down, 150Mbps up

Fast charging Quick Charge 4+ Quick Charge 3.0 Quick Charge 3.0
Manufacturing process 8nm 11nm 11nm

What does this mean for you?

While the world looks at a 5G-future, the fact of the matter is that 4G handsets and affordable handsets remain the company’s bread and butter. The Snapdragon 460, 662 and 720G bring tangible improvements to performance, imaging and local connectivity. All three are critical features in developing markets where mobile gaming and imaging-based applications are fast turning out to be key selling points for smartphones.

Qualcomm says that Snapdragon 720G based phones should be available started Q1 2020. Unfortunately, you’ve got a long wait ahead of you if you were looking for a new entry-level phone powered by the Snapdragon 460 or 662 platform. Those will ship towards the end of 2020.

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Who is BBK, the world’s second largest phone manufacturer?


Realme branding on Realme 5 and 5 Pro - Who is BBK

The smartphone has a number of major players these days, outside the familiar brands of Apple and Samsung. Huawei has been trying to cement itself as the second-largest brand, with successful pushes into Asian and European markets. But its position has been put into jeopardy due to Huawei’s ban from US markets and technology. Instead, the best-positioned contender comes from the lesser-known BBK Electronics.

BBK is a Chinese multinational corporation. It owns a number of popular brands across various consumer electronics markets, including headphones, Blu-ray players, and smartphones. It also oversees a number of major smartphone brands including one fan-favorite — Oppo, Vivo, Realme, and OnePlus.

Who is BBK?

BBK Electronics has been operating in various sections of China’s electronics industry since the 1990’s. Duan Yongping, a reclusive billionaire, spearheaded the company. After successfully generating more than 1 billion Yuan from the “Subor” gaming console, a competitor to the Nintendo Entertainment System, Duan left his position running a Chinese factory in 1995. He then started the company Bubugao, which would eventually become BBK. The company now owns factories spread over 10 hectares of land and more than 17,000 employees.

BBK Electronics began by manufacturing a range of CD, MP3, and DVD players, along with other household appliances. These appeared under a range of global brands. In 2004 Duan founded Oppo with CEO Tony Chen. Oppo built on Duan’s experience in the video market by selling DVD and Blu-ray players, before moving into the smartphone market.

Meet the BBK brands

Vivo Z1x profile shot showing gradient and camera

Vivo was the first major BBK subsidiary. Founded by Duan and Vivo CEO Shen Wei in 2009. The first Vivo smartphones appeared in 2011 with a focus on ultra-slim form factors, while relying on celebrity endorsements to capitalize on the smartphone boom. Vivo’s core business is feature-packed mid-rangers, but has grabbed headlines in recent years with its experimental Apex concept phones and the Nex series.

Realme is a similar but much newer Oppo spin-off. It was established by Sky Li (born Bingzhong Li), previously the Vice-President of Oppo Electronics, on May 4, 2018. The brand originally appeared in China as Oppo Real back in 2010 before rebranding and entering a series of new markets, including Europe and India, in 2018 and 2019. Realme’s phones combine cutting-edge tech with affordable price tags. It even managed to snag our Best of Android 2019 award.

Duan didn’t start OnePlus either, the BBK brand that Western customers might be most familiar with. Instead, former Oppo vice president Pete Lau and co-founder Carl Pei set up the company in 2013. While OnePlus has the highest global profile of any of the BBK brands, it is still a subsidiary of Oppo, making it a subsidiary of parent company BBK too. OnePlus is also arguably the most premium brand of the bunch. However, it takes a different approach to Oppo and Vivo’s retail-based business model. OnePlus primarily targets online sales via platforms like Amazon, which has helped BBK enter European and US markets.

Second or third place, depending on who you ask

Oppo Reno 2 with shark fin camera

When it comes to smartphones, BBK Electronics is a big deal, even though most consumers have never heard of it. Oppo and Vivo have long been major players not just in the Chinese smartphone market, but internationally too. OnePlus and Realme are quickly adding additional markets and sales on top of the company’s Chinese stronghold.

In China, Oppo and Vivo have managed to surpass the growth rate of the once seemingly invincible Xiaomi by building a network of local stores, while its competitor focused on its efforts online. Apple and Samsung have struggled to keep pace with the cost-competitive nature of China’s homegrown mobile brands, including those in the BBK network.

On a global scale, data from CounterPoint consistently places combined BBK brand market shares in second place towards the end of 2019. At the last count, BBK moves ahead of the combined might of Huawei and Honor and is right behind Samsung in terms of global shipments and share. Apple retains its second spot during its fourth-quarter new release surge. However, it is otherwise now fourth place in the global scheme of things.

Looking at the BBK brands individually paints quite a different picture. There’s a familiar first, second, and third-ranking for Samsung, Huawei, and Apple respectively. Oppo remains BBK’s largest individual brand and is only a couple of percentage points behind Apple for third place on its own.

Global Smartphone Market Share Q3 2019

The change in fortunes over the past couple of years is mostly due to the huge growth in markets such as China and India. Chinese brands have capitalized on their home markets and their value for money proposition has played well in India and Southeast Asian markets. Combined with aggressive marketing and investments in retail networks, India’s market leader Xiaomi has started feeling the pressure. Meanwhile, Apple and Samsung, in particular, are struggling to grow their brands in these markets and are instead reliant on their more traditional but stagnant bases.

Market estimates always have some margin of error, but the data shows a close race for second between BBK and Huawei in the grander, global picture. The two aren’t very far behind market leader Samsung now either. The 2020 rankings are all to play for.

Looking forward

BBK Electronics isn’t satisfied with just having a strong lead in China. The company is battling it out with Xiaomi for the top spot in India, which remains a key growth market. Meanwhile, Realme and OnePlus are broadening the company’s horizons outside of Asia. BBK also launched another brand named ikoo a few years ago. This smartphone sub-brand leverages experience in children’s educational electronic toys to create the world’s first education handset.

By spreading itself across multiple brands, BBK has managed to tailor its products to suit various market segments. The strategy has clearly paid off in China and is quickly growing across India and now in parts of Europe too. After all, the company is hard to ignore when it’s subsidiaries are pumping out devices like the OnePlus 7T and Realme X2 Pro.

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PinePhone: Everything you need to know about the $150 Linux-powered phone


Pine64 PinePhonePine64

It’s no secret that two operating systems hold the lion’s share of the mobile market — Android and iOS. This current duopoly doesn’t give users much choice in the way of OS offerings, even though there is no shortage of hardware. In the past, Microsoft tried to break into the market to no avail, and Huawei will release its own offering soon enough.

But what if there was another alternative, one that’s more privacy-respecting and encourages tinkering? Enter the PinePhone by Pine64. This device isn’t quite ready for the mass market yet, but if you are looking for a unique alternative to Android and iOS devices, you’ll want to keep an eye on this one.

The company behind the PinePhone

Pine64 PINE A64 specsPine64

Pine64 is a small, community-driven company that specializes in developing ARM devices. It began by producing single-board computers similar to the Raspberry Pi. Eventually, the company also started developing laptops that run on these single-board computers, and now the company is branching into the mobile phone market — hence the PinePhone. Pine64 also plans on releasing a smartwatch and a tablet in the future, but those are conversations for another day.

What exactly is the PinePhone?

Pine64 PinePhone front back anglesPine64

The PinePhone is a fully open-sourced smartphone, and it is Pine64’s most ambitious project to date. And unlike most devices you can get buy today, Pine64 didn’t design the PinePhone to run Android or iOS. The company developed the device to run Linux.

The PinePhone may be a little too complicated for the average consumer.

We don’t know for sure which specific operating system the consumer-ready device will ship with, but Pine64 says it supports all available major Linux phone projects. Some notable projects include Ubuntu Touch, Sailfish OS, and Plasma Mobile. Each OS comes with its own pros and cons, and that variety is one of the PinePhone’s competitive advantages.

Users can choose which platform best suits their needs instead of simply using the one manufacturers want them to use. That means, depending on what OS they choose, they may have a vastly different experience from someone else who chooses a different OS for their PinePhone. On the flip side, users may have to load these operating systems on the device themselves, making the PinePhone a little too complicated for the average consumer.

What about the PinePhone specs?

Pine64 PinePhone SpecsPine64

The PinePhone will come in at a grand total of $ 150, and the specs match that price tag. It will come with the Allwinner A64 quad-core SoC, Mali 400 MP2 GPU, 2GB of RAM, and a 2,000mAh battery.

The display will be a 5.95-inch 1,440×720 LCD panel. The rear camera will tout a 5MP shooter, while the selfie camera sports a measly 2MP sensor.

You shouldn’t get this device if you are looking for high-end specs.

It will also include a USB-C charging port, a headphone jack, and a plastic chassis. Altogether, the device will weigh somewhere between 180 and 200 grams. Needless to say, you shouldn’t get this device if you are looking for high-end specs.

Will it run my favorite mobile apps?

Red Magic 3S play store

The answer to this question is not as simple as we might hope. Depending on which OS you choose, you will get access to vastly different application libraries. Some of the supported operating systems aim to include full Linux app support. Others want to develop their own mobile app ecosystem.

Expect to make some sacrifices as far as mobile app selection is concerned.

Thanks to Ubuntu Touch’s emphasis on web apps, it probably offers the most complete mobile app ecosystem out of the box. Sailfish OS’ native apps leave much to be desired, but it allows users to install some Android apps on specific devices. Hopefully, the PinePhone will get this ability too.

Other than that, app options are limited with the other offerings. If you are thinking about purchasing this device, expect to make some sacrifices as far as mobile app selection is concerned.

What is the PinePhone’s launch date, price, and availability?

Pine64 PinePhone BraveHeart EditionPine64

Right now, you can preorder a version of the device called the BraveHeart Edition, though I wouldn’t recommend you buy one. Pine64 made this version of the PinePhone solely for developers and early adopters, and it is not daily driver material.

The consumer-ready version will retail for $ 150, and Pine64 says it will launch sometime in Spring 2020. The device will ship worldwide, but some markets may be subject to extra shipping costs.


I don’t know about you, but I am pumped about this device. The idea of a completely open-source smartphone that is designed to be tinkered with excites me like none other.

Am I expecting the Pinephone to replace everyone’s Android device? Absolutely not. But do I think you should purchase one anyway? I do. It will only cost about as much as the average smart display, and it has the potential to expand our imaginations into what mobile computing could look like, not just what it is.

What about you? Are you excited about this device? Let us know in the poll below, and tell us why or why not in the comments section.

Please wait.. Loading poll


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