Tag Archive | "know"

Sony’s new $5,000 hologram display, and more tech news you need to know today


Your tech news digest, by way of the DGiT Daily tech newsletter, for Friday, 16 October 2020.

1. Sony is trying to bring holograms to the world (again)

Sony's new $  5,000 hologram machine

Not for the first time, a major industry player is working on making holograms happen.

Sony’s new idea is a $ 5,000 15.6-inch display, built on a metal wedge, with stereoscopic 3D.

  • It’s called a Spatial Reality Display or ELF-SR1, and places like The Verge and Engadget had them arrive from Sony to test out.
  • It’s not new, as such. The effect has been used in 3D TVs and so on, but generally always fallen short of being more like a fun feature rather than truly useful for most people, even professionals.
  • But this is without glasses, which is a bonus.
  • Looking Glass also sells one, for $ 3,000, though it’s a little bit different.

What it does:

  • The Verge: “I plugged it into a powerful gaming computer, and fired up the first demo. A tiny, intricately detailed Volkswagen Atlas materialized in front of my face — and when I pressed a button, it floated right up out of the screen. A couple minutes later, I was watching a 4-inch tall anime girl dance her heart out inside Sony’s contraption, tapping her feet atop a floor of hexagonal mirrors. It’s the magic of stereoscopic 3D.”
  • Sony’s camera tracks your face and eyes, making real-time adjustments as you look at models, pictures, and so on.
  • It’s by no means perfect. It works for one viewer only, and it’s really an in-person effect only, not really demonstrable in our 2D world.
  • The Verge suggests the 3D illusion can be broken as you lean in too far, or move sides.
  • And people who witnessed it at the time, all the way back at CES, weren’t overly impressed, including my own colleagues here.
  • But things have evolved! And while I doubt anyone interested purely in consumer technology is lining up to buy (me included, I’ll leave it well alone) it might be something for engineers, scientists, architects, animators, and content creators in Hollywood and so on.
  • Sony has released an SDK for both Unreal and Unity.
  • Somewhat enjoyably, Sony will show this off at a virtual demo sign up on October 22nd at 3pm ET, but the 3D effect can’t really be shown so… who knows what we’ll see?

2. Samsung mocks Apple’s lack of charger, but how long until it backpedals? (Android Authority).


3. Google is finally going to close out Hangouts sometime in 2021. Chat will become Hangouts. Chat is part of Gmail. Hangouts disappears. Got it? (Android Authority).


4. Google Search is getting new AI tools to decipher your terrible spelling (The Verge).


5. Early iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro AnTuTu benchmarks are at odds with Apple’s claims for the A14 Bionic. Better, yes, but not 50% better? Will wait for more official benchmarks (notebookcheck.net)


6. This is really interesting: Microsoft will give GameStop a share of Xbox’s digital revenues, which is, I think, unprecedented. And proves that physical retail is important enough that even Microsoft feels compelled to support it. We don’t know the magnitude of GameStop’s cut, either. (Ars Technica).


7. Sony gives in-depth look at PlayStation 5 UI in new video. 11 minutes of menus would normally not be interesting, but Sony’s new interface is much busier than the sparse PS4 (The Verge).


8. Twitter updates its ‘Hacked Materials’ policy after NY Post controversy (Engadget).


9. “I cannot in good faith recommend this Japanese desk tent”. The video is the kind of deadpan dry humor I needed (Gizmodo).


10. There’s “an email to a former board member” doing the rounds of VC Twitter and it is excruciating to read (Twitter).


11. The dire working conditions for Ring’s call center employees in the Philippines (NBC).


12. Old Faithful might not survive global warming (Earther).


13. “What’s older than we think?” (r/askreddit).


Dgit Daily is powered by our sister site dgit.com

Visit dgit Daily

Finally, a tech subscription worth reading.

Sign up for daily digests of the tech content most relevant to you.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy.

The DGiT Daily delivers a daily email that keeps you ahead of the curve for all tech news, opinions, and links to what’s going down in the planet’s most important field. You get all the context and insight you need, and all with a touch of fun. Plus! Rotating daily fun for each day of the week, like Wednesday Weirdness. Join in!


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE (Fan Edition): Everything you need to know (On sale!)


Samsung Galaxy S20 FE camera macro off center

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

Today, Samsung took the wraps off its newest smartphone in the flagship Galaxy S series: the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE (the ‘FE’ stands for “Fan Edition”). As the name implies, this phone offers what Samsung considers to be the most important features that Galaxy S fans want.

Related: Samsung phones buyer’s guide: Everything you need to know

While fans will find most of their desired specs and features here, Samsung is also leaving out several premium aspects of the main Galaxy S20 series, which results in a lowered price.

Below, you’ll find everything we know about the Samsung Galaxy S20 Fan Edition. We will keep this article up-to-date if Samsung announces any newer info or big changes.

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE: What is it?

The Galaxy S20 FE is sort of like a “greatest hits” of the Galaxy S20 series. It offers the features that Samsung thinks its fans want the most while leaving out the features that fans either don’t care about or would gladly do without if it lowered the price.

With that in mind, the usual Galaxy S features are all here: a flagship processor, expandable storage, an IP68 rating, a big AMOLED display, wireless charging, Wireless PowerShare, and a triple-lens rear camera.

Related: Samsung Galaxy S20 buyer’s guide | Galaxy S20 FE hands-on

In addition to the usual specs and features, the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE also comes in a slew of colors, many of which are new to the Galaxy S family.

However, Samsung also reduced or removed several features and design elements. There’s less RAM, a “glasstic” back, a reduced display resolution, and a weaker overall camera system. There’s also no headphone jack, which is unfortunate.

Who is it for?

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE in hand 1

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

Samsung’s marketing makes it clear that it is gunning for a younger audience with the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE. The reduced price, colorways, and provided promotional images all scream “hip, young Millennials.”

That being said, you don’t need to be under 30 to enjoy this phone. It offers pretty much all the core features of the main Galaxy S line at a much more affordable price. For some buyers, this phone might actually improve upon the primary line, such as offering a flat display panel, the use of an optical fingerprint sensor instead of an ultrasonic one, and those new fun colorways.

It’s clear that Samsung is gunning for Millennial buyers with this phone, but anyone can enjoy it.

Samsung is also offering the same three years of Android updates the primary Galaxy S phones get. That means you should see Android 11, Android 12, and possibly even Android 13.

In general, this phone is for anyone who wants a terrific smartphone in the Galaxy S line but doesn’t want to spend over $ 1,000 to get one.

What are the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE features?

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE in hand 2

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

Once again, Samsung is going after Millennials with this new device, so the core features cater to what that market wants. That means the camera, battery life, and gaming-centric features.

On the back of the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE, you’ll find a triple-lens camera system, arranged in a familiar-looking module. The primary shooter is a 12MP wide-angle lens with optical image stabilization (OIS). Flanking that are a 12MP ultra-wide and an 8MP telephoto. That last one has a 3x optical zoom with 30x digital “Space Zoom.”

Most of the features here are lifted directly from the flagship Galaxy S and Galaxy Note phones.

There are also a ton of software features for the camera. There’s Night Hyperlapse which allows you to take some cool cityscape shots. There’s the Single Take feature from the Galaxy S and Galaxy Note lines that takes up to 10 photos from a 15-second video. Finally, there’s a feature called My Filter that allows you to extract a color filter from one of your photos. You can save up to 99 of these custom filters.

The battery in the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE is pretty big at 4,500mAh. That’s the same size as the one in the Galaxy S20 Plus and 500mAh bigger than the one in the vanilla Galaxy S20. There’s wireless charging and reverse wireless charging, too. Unfortunately, the adapter that comes with the phone only maxes out at 15W of charging speeds. However, you can buy a 25W charger separately and the phone will support that faster speed.

Finally, the 120Hz display refresh rate can be on at all times since the phone maxes out at a 1080p resolution. In addition, there’s a 240Hz touch response rate, which automatically turns on during gameplay. This might give you an edge up on the competition.

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE specs

  Samsung Galaxy S20 FE
Display 6.5-inch flat Super AMOLED
Infinity-O cutout, centered
FHD+ (2,400 x 1,080) resolution
407ppi
120Hz refresh rate
HDR 10+
Gorilla Glass 3 cover
CPU 5G models:
Qualcomm Snapdragon 865

4G models:
Samsung Exynos 990

GPU 5G models:
Adreno 650

4G models:
Arm Mali-G77 MP11

RAM 6GB LPDDR5
Storage 128GB internal
UFS 3.0
microSD support up to 1TB
Power 4,500mAh battery
15W wired charging (in-box adapter)
25W wired charging (add’l adapter needed)
15W wireless charging
Wireless PowerShare
Cameras Rear:

12MP wide-angle
Dual-Pixel, OIS
ƒ1.8, 1/1.76in, 1.8μm

12MP ultra-wide
ƒ2.2, 1/3.06in, 1.12μm

8MP telephoto
3x optical zoom, OIS
30x digital “Space Zoom”
ƒ2.4, 1/4.4in, 1.0μm

Front:

32MP (binned to 8MP)
ƒ2.2, 1/2.8in, 0.8μm

Durability IP68 rated
1.5m water depth for 30 min.
Security Optical in-display fingerprint
Connectivity 5G support (both sub-6GHz and mmWave)
802.11ax/b/g/n/ac
Bluetooth 5.0
USB-C with USB 3.2 speeds
NFC and MST
Samsung Dex support
Audio Stereo speakers
Dolby Atmos support
No headphone jack
OS Android 10
Dimensions and weight 74.5 x 159.8 x 8.4mm
190g
Colors Cloud Navy, Cloud Red, Cloud Lavender, Cloud Mint, Cloud White, Cloud Orange

Competition and alternatives

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE Box

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

The most obvious alternatives to the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE are the phones in the main Galaxy S20 line. Those phones will offer most of the same features while either adding in more or improving them. Of course, they will cost more — a lot more. The lowest-tier Galaxy S20 device has a list price that is $ 300 more expensive than this one.

Another alternative would be the vanilla OnePlus 8. That phone offers a lot of the same specs at the exact same price. However, the OnePlus 8 does not feature wireless charging, reverse wireless charging, or an IP68 rating.

Related: The best Samsung phones you can get right now

Finally, you can’t forget about last year’s Galaxy flagships. The Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus is still a terrific phone and offers a handful of better specs (higher resolution display, more RAM, etc.). With that one, though, you’ll lose out on 5G support and a high refresh rate display.

The bottom line is that there aren’t too many phones at this price point that offer a similar set of features. This phone might be the “Goldilocks” device for some 2020 buyers.

Where to buy the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE Hole punch selfie macro 1

Credit: David Imel / Android Authority

The Galaxy S20 Fan Edition is now on sale.

In the United States, the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE costs $ 699 and comes exclusively in a 5G model. You can get it unlocked from Samsung and other retailers, or head to your carrier’s store to grab one. In the case of Verizon, it carries an exclusive variant of the phone called the Galaxy S20 FE 5G UW (seriously).

In the United Kingdom, there is a 5G variant and a 4G-only variant. The 5G model costs £699 (~$ 890) while the 4G-only model costs £599 (~$ 763). Similarly, in Europe, the 4G-only Galaxy S20 FE starts at €659 (~$ 769) while the 5G version costs €759 (~$ 886).

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE All the best features of the Galaxy S20 series at a lower price
If you don’t mind cutting a few corners, the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE (which stands for “Fan Edition”) might be the phone you are looking for. It offers most of the flagship specs and features of the Galaxy S20 family but trims things down to keep the price low.

Whether in the US or the UK, the 5G models all come with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 chipset. In the UK, the 4G-only model comes with the Exynos 990 chipset.

Regardless of where you live, all buyers get four months of YouTube Premium for free. That offer is open through the end of October.

Top Samsung Galaxy S20 FE questions and answers

Q: Does the Galaxy S20 FE support 5G?
A: Yes and no. In the US, there are only 5G models, and they support both mmWave and sub-6GHz connections (except for the Verizon model, which only supports mmWave). In the UK, there are 5G models and 4G-only models, so be sure you’re buying the correct version!

Q: Does the Galaxy S20 Fan Edition have a headphone jack?
A: No. As with all the phones in the main Galaxy S20 line, there isn’t a 3.5mm port on the Fan Edition.

Q: Does the S20 FE support wireless charging?
A: Yes. It will charge at a rate of 15W. It also supports reverse wireless charging, which allows you to charge your smartwatch or earbuds with your phone.

Q: Does the S20 FE have a microSD card slot?
A: Yes, it can support a card with up to 1TB of storage.

Q: Does the device have stereo speakers?
A: Yes, and they are tuned by AKG and support Dolby Atmos.

Q: What colors are available?
A: There are a lot of colors. You can get the phone in Cloud Navy (blue), Cloud Red, Cloud Lavender (purple), Cloud Mint (green), Cloud White, and Cloud Orange.

Q: What’s in the box with the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE?
A: You’ll find the Galaxy S20 FE, a 15W power supply, a USB-C cable, a SIM tool, and the usual paperwork. The Galaxy S20 FE will also support 25W wired charging, but you’ll need to buy an additional adapter to experience those speeds.


That’s everything you need to know about the Samsung Galaxy S20 FE. We’ll keep this post updated with any new info as soon as we have it.


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Google Pixel 5 buyer’s guide: Everything you need to know


The Google Pixel 5 is finally official and we have all the details. In this Google Pixel 5 buyer’s guide, we’ve got the info you’ll need to make a smart purchase decision and we answer your frequently asked questions.

Editor’s note: We’ll regularly update this Pixel 5 guide with more tips, resources, and details, so stay tuned.

Google Pixel 5 at a glance

Google Pixel 5 Google’s first 5G smartphone
The Google Pixel 5 may not be the high-end Pixel we were expecting, but it’s a pretty compelling mid-range option. Google is going back to basics with the Pixel 5, ditching higher-end features like face recognition and the quirky Motion Sense gestures.

The Pixel 5 was announced on September 30, 2020 at Google’s Launch Night In event. This is Google’s top-end phone of 2020 and it’s a great option if you want:

  • A more affordable 5G phone with some flagship-level features
  • A great camera experience
  • A smaller-than-typical size
  • Quality software and guaranteed updates

The Pixel 5 costs $ 699 in the US, where it’s available in only one size, two colors, and one storage configuration. It competes with the LG Velvet, the OnePlus 8, OnePlus Nord (outside the US), the Samsung Galaxy A71, the Galaxy S20 FE, and a slew of other upper mid-range to flagship 5G phones.

You should avoid the Pixel 5 if you want:

  • The best performance possible in a phone
  • Two-day battery life or more
  • The best zoom capabilities

Further reading: The best Google products

Is the Google Pixel 5 worth buying?

The $ 699 Google Pixel 5 looks like a great phone on paper in North America, with brands like Realme and Xiaomi not a factor on the continent. But it still seems like a good purchase in general if you want a 5G phone with brisk updates and flagship-style features but don’t want to pay 2020 flagship money.

In saying so, Google’s Pixel phones have previously suffered from hardware problems, while Pixel spec sheets traditionally tend to be pretty anemic compared to phones from other brands. Those on the hunt for the most bang for their buck or the most reliable phone should keep this in mind.

In the case of the spec sheet, the Pixel 4 was arguably the least impressive flagship of 2019, packing a small battery and lacking a triple rear camera setup seen on rival phones. For the Pixel 5, it looks like Google has beefed things up in some ways, but not in others.

What other AA readers think of the Google Pixel 5

This marks the first time that Google ditches flagship silicon for its high-end Pixels, adopting an upper mid-range Snapdragon 765G processor. Is this a no-go for Android Authority readers though? Well, over 1,600 readers took our poll back in June, with almost 57% saying it wasn’t a dealbreaker.

Pixel 5 mid range chipset poll results

Credit: Hadlee Simons / Android Authority

This suggested that Android Authority readers were willing to overlook the lack of top-end power if the Pixel 5 delivered in other areas (e.g. pricing and extra features).

Earlier this week, we also asked readers whether the then-rumored price tag for the Pixel 5 was worth it. This question was asked prior to specs and other features being disclosed by Google. As of writing, the most popular choice was “it’s a bit expensive but worth it for a Pixel.” Check out the results below.

Pixel 5 worth it poll results

Credit: Hadlee Simons / Android Authority

Just over 25% of readers said that the phone is outright overpriced. But between respondents wanting to see the spec sheet, those who think it’s a bargain, and those who think it’s worth it for a Pixel, it looks like Google might have landed on a solid price.

Google Pixel 5 specs

The Google Pixel 5 isn’t going to win any awards for sheer horsepower, but the phone still brings quite a few features to the table anyway. Check out our Google Pixel 5 specs overview below.

  Google Pixel 5
Display 6-inch OLED
2,340 x 1,080 resolution
19.5:9 aspect ratio
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 765G
2x Cortex-A76
6x Cortex-A55
GPU Adreno 620
RAM 8GB
Storage 128GB
No microSD slot
Cameras Rear:

Main:
12.2MP, f/1.7, 1.4µm pixels, optical + electronic image stabilization

Secondary:
16MP, f/2.2, 1 micron pixel, ultra-wide (107 degree FoV)

Front:
8MP sensor, f/2.0, 1.12µm pixels, fixed focus, 83-degree field-of-view

Headphone jack No
Battery 4,080mAh
18W charging
Wireless charging
IP rating IP68
Software Android 11

What should you expect from the Pixel 5 camera?

Google Pixel 5 cameras

Credit: Hadlee Simons / Android Authority

The Pixel 5 adopts the same 12MP IMX363 main camera we’ve seen on several generations of Pixels now, including the Pixel 3a and Pixel 4a. If anything, we’re expecting software to make the difference when shooting via this main camera.

The secondary camera is a completely different story though, as Google has eschewed the Pixel 4 line’s 16MP telephoto camera in favor of a 16MP ultra-wide shooter. This new camera means you can capture many scenes without having to take a few steps back, such as cityscapes, landscapes, and groups of people. But what does this mean for the phone’s zoom capabilities?

Google touted its Super Res Zoom solution on the Pixel 3, using super resolution algorithms and more to deliver hybrid zoom that was better than traditional digital zoom. However, results still fell short of phones with dedicated telephoto lenses, especially when going beyond 2x or 3x shots. The Pixel 4 then introduced the 2x telephoto camera, and this allowed for a big step up in quality at short range zoom levels, while also delivering improved Super Res Zoom images up to 8x.

We’re expecting the Pixel 5 zoom quality to be something akin to the Pixel 3’s quality. Super Res Zoom without a telephoto lens should still produce fine results when taking 2x or 3x zoom shots. Nevertheless, check back here soon for our thoughts on the Pixel 5’s zoom abilities once we’ve had a go with it.

More on zoom: Don’t believe what smartphone manufacturers tell you about zoom

Google Night Sight Portrait Mode

Credit: Google

In addition, Google is giving HDR+ a “serious upgrade.” Google is introducing exposure bracketing on the Pixel 5 that should result in all-around clearer photos with the new wide-angle lens.

Night Sight, Google’s fantastic low-light camera mode, is also coming to portrait mode. Portrait Light is coming to portrait mode, too. You can add this effect to your portrait photos after you’ve taken a picture if your subject is too dark.

Google is finally focusing on video, at least a little bit. It’s adding three new stabilization modes to the Pixel 5: locked, active, and cinematic pan. The latter video mode “creates sweeping, dramatic Hollywood effects” through stabilizing and slowing down the motion of your video at 2x.

How is the Pixel 5 battery life?

We haven’t spent enough time with the Pixel 5 yet to answer this question, but we do know the phone packs a much bigger battery than the Pixel 4a and the Pixel 4. In fact, the Pixel 5 battery is over 1,000mAh bigger than the Pixel 4’s 2,800mAh pack.

The Pixel 5 does offer 5G connectivity, which consumes more power than 4G, but we’re still expecting longer battery life than the Pixel 4. Judging by the Pixel 4a’s good endurance with a 3,140mAh battery (6.5 to seven hours of screen-on time), we’re hoping that the Pixel 5 will be able to reach similar heights.

Google is also introducing extreme battery saver mode on the Pixel 5. This allows you to decide which apps you’d like to keep on while everything else is paused. Google says this will get you up to 48 hours of extra battery life.

Is the Pixel 5 fast enough?

One thing that’s a certainty is that the Pixel 5 is weaker than the Pixel 4 and other 2019 flagships (let alone 2020 flagships) when it comes to sheer CPU and graphical power. Our own Robert Triggs compared the Snapdragon 765G to 2020 and 2019 flagship silicon, and the results tell us a lot.

The CPU performance gap is pretty small between the Snapdragon 765G and the Snapdragon 855 when it comes to single-core performance. But the Snapdragon 855 streaks ahead when it comes to multi-core results, owing to it offering more heavyweight CPU cores. We also see a pretty big gap when it comes to graphical performance.

In other words, those wanting to play the most advanced games and emulators at a smooth framerate might want to buy a Snapdragon 865 or Snapdragon 855 phone. But the Pixel 5’s chipset should still deliver great performance in general and in most games.

Google Pixel 5 vs Pixel 4: What’s new?

google pixel 4 xl oh so orange camera module

The Pixel 5 lacks two main features compared to the Pixel 4, and that’s the flagship silicon and Motion Sense/face unlock technology. We’ve already covered the chipset disparity, but the lack of Motion Sense and associated face unlock tech is pretty notable.

Motion Sense gestures weren’t to everyone’s liking, while face unlock has become less important than ever thanks to COVID-19. Google has however resurrected the rear fingerprint scanner, allowing you to unlock your phone while still wearing a mask. Furthermore, fingerprint unlock is supported by a ton of apps (unlike face unlock).

Otherwise, the Pixel 5 also sees RAM and base storage upgrades. Instead of the Pixel 4’s 6GB of RAM and 64GB of base storage (with an option for 128GB), you’ve got 8GB of RAM and 128GB as the sole option.

Moving to photography, Google has ditched the Pixel 4 family’s 16MP telephoto secondary camera in favor of a 16MP ultra-wide secondary shooter. It’s disappointing that Google didn’t offer a flexible triple rear camera setup, as we’ve seen from rival manufacturers. Nevertheless, we’re glad to see an ultra-wide rear camera on a Pixel, and Super Res Zoom should still deliver decent results at short range zoom factors.

We also see a battery capacity bump compared to the Pixel 4 series, leaping to 4,080mAh. Meanwhile, the Pixel 4 packs a 2,800mAh cell while the Pixel 4 XL offers a 3,700mAh battery. We’re guessing that endurance will be somewhere between the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL (owing to the Pixel 5’s 5G support), but hopefully it’s closer to the XL model.

The screen size falls in between the Pixel 4’s 5.8-inch panel and the XL’s 6.3-inch screen, coming in at 6-inches (19.5:9, 2,340 x 1,080). Much like the Pixel 4a though, the Pixel 5 packs a more modern punch-hole cutout instead of a bezel or notch.

What about the Google Pixel 4a 5G?

GOOGLE PIXEL 4A 5G PRESS RENDERS 6

Credit: Google

The cheaper Pixel 4a 5G has quite a bit in common with the Pixel 5. The biggest shared feature is the Snapdragon 765G chipset and associated 5G connectivity. You’re getting less RAM with the cheaper phone (6GB), but the common silicon means you can expect a similar level of performance on the whole.

Other common features include the same dual rear camera setup (normal and ultra-wide), 128GB of storage, and 18W wired charging. There are a few compromises to consider, though.

Read: The best 5G phones you can buy right now

The biggest cutback might be the 6.2-inch OLED screen, which lacks a high refresh rate compared to the 90Hz-toting Pixel 5. This might not be a dealbreaker for most, but those looking for a smoother, more responsive screen or upgrading from a phone with a high refresh rate panel already might be disappointed.

Other notable cutbacks include no wireless charging, no significant IP rating, a plastic back, and a slightly smaller battery  at 3,885mAh. Then again, the lack of a high refresh rate means that a small drop in battery size is understandable.

The Pixel 4a 5G will retail for $ 499, making it $ 200 cheaper than the Pixel 5. Is it worth splashing out that much more for the flagship? Well, that depends on what you want in a smartphone.

What are some good Google Pixel 5 alternatives?

Google Pixel 5 Google Store

Credit: Google

The Pixel 5 is a rather interesting proposition, packing upper mid-range power, a slightly cheaper price than current flagships, as well as premium features like an IP rating and wireless charging.

There are quite a few Pixel 5 alternatives though, but you’ll need to weigh up pricing, features, and regional availability when making a decision to buy one of them.

Here are some Pixel 5 alternatives you should consider:

  • Pixel 4a 5G ($ 499): The Pixel 4a 5G lacks features like water resistance, wireless charging, and a high refresh rate screen. But you’re getting 5G, the same processor, and that familiar stock Android. You’re also getting brisk updates by opting for this phone.
  • Apple iPhone 11 ($ 700): Don’t mind switching to iOS and can’t wait for the iPhone 12? Then the iPhone 11 might be for you. It packs a similar dual rear camera setup, plenty of power for smooth performance, water resistance, and wireless charging. There are a few features missing from the iPhone 11 though, such as 5G, a high refresh rate, OLED screen, and a fingerprint scanner.
  • OnePlus Nord (~$ 500): The OnePlus Nord is roughly $ 200 cheaper than the Pixel 5, but packs the same 5G processor, a 90Hz OLED screen, and a similar sized battery. It lacks wireless charging, water resistance, and stock Android, but delivers two selfie cameras (one for ultra-wide shots) and four rear cameras. We think two of these rear cameras are just there to increase the numbers, while the main and ultra-wide rear snappers aren’t exactly great. You can also pay up to $ 200 extra for the OnePlus 8 if you must have a OnePlus phone with top-end power, but the Nord delivers most of the overall experience anyway.
  • LG Velvet ($ 600): This might be one of the closest phones to the Pixel 5 in North America, aside from the Pixel 4a 5G. You’ve got a similar level of horsepower, 5G, a slightly bigger battery, and a similar price tag. The LG Velvet also sports an optional second screen case, wireless charging, water resistance and, unlike the Pixel 5, a headphone port. Just don’t expect fast updates, a high refresh rate, or class-leading photo quality.
  • Samsung Galaxy S20 FE (~$ 700): Samsung’s latest S20 series phone ups the ante over the Pixel 5 by bringing proper flagship power, a 120Hz OLED screen, a bigger battery, and a flexible triple rear camera combo. It also delivers wireless charging and IP68 water resistance, as well as three years of OS updates. Looking for a cheaper Samsung phone as a Pixel 5 alternative? The Galaxy A71 is $ 100 cheaper than the S20 FE and costs $ 100 less than the Pixel. You’re missing out on a high refresh rate screen, wireless charging, and water resistance.
  • Realme X50 Pro (€600): Realme dropped its first 5G flagship in the first half of 2020, and it still makes for a very attractive proposition. A powerful Snapdragon 865 chipset, 90Hz OLED screen, flexible quad rear cameras, and a 4,200mAh battery with 65W charging make for a great combo. Unfortunately it lacks wireless charging and an IP rating. Realme isn’t quite on Google or Samsung’s level when it comes to update commitments either.

Should you buy the Google Pixel 5 now or wait?

Google tends to launch its flagship phones a few months before all eyes turn to the next-generation of smartphones, but the Pixel 5 is somewhat different in that it’s not playing a traditional specs war. Instead, Google is banking on the combination of software, pricing, and a few welcome hardware upgrades elsewhere to make for a compelling proposition.

Google also has a habit of dropping prices in the months after launch. If you’re not in immediate need of a phone, it might be worth waiting a month or two.

You should also ask yourself whether a high refresh rate screen, IP rating, and wireless charging are must-have features in a phone. If so, you can definitely do worse than the Pixel 5 for $ 699. If these features aren’t important to you, the $ 499 Pixel 4a 5G might be up your alley instead.

Where to buy the Pixel 5

The Google Pixel 5 is available from the Google Store and via Google Fi. Other retailers that will offer it include Amazon, Best Buy, and Walmart.

Again, the Pixel 5 in the US is going for $ 699. Pricing in Europe is set at £599/€629.

Google Pixel 5 Google’s first 5G smartphone
The Google Pixel 5 may not be the high-end Pixel we were expecting, but it’s a pretty compelling mid-range option. Google is going back to basics with the Pixel 5, ditching higher-end features like face recognition and the quirky Motion Sense gestures.

Google Pixel 5 software and updates

The Google Pixel 5 continues the Google tradition of timely software updates. Those worried about Android version updates and security patches should have peace of mind here. Google also commits to three years of Android system updates and security patches for its Pixel phones, and the Pixel 5 is no exception. This puts it in a very exclusive club, with only Samsung and occasionally OnePlus offering a similar level of support.

The company has also started issuing Pixel “feature drops”, which are Pixel and Google app updates rolled into one quarterly update for Pixel phones. Or at least it’s intended to be a quarterly release. For example, the March 2020 feature drop delivered dark mode scheduling, new Motion Sense gestures on the Pixel 4, new emoji, and Rules functionality.

The Pixel 5 ships with Android 11 and is expected to get Android 12 in 2021 and Android 13 in 2022.

Top Pixel 5 questions and answers

Q: Where’s the Google Pixel 5 XL?

A: There isn’t a Pixel 5 XL unfortunately, with the Pixel 4 XL or the Pixel 4a 5G being your next best bets if you want a bigger Pixel.

Q: What kind of 5G networks are supported?

A: The Pixel 5 supports both mmWave and sub-6GHz 5G networks.

Q: Does the Pixel 5 have a headphone jack?

A: No, the Pixel 5 doesn’t offer a headphone jack. Thankfully, this option is available on the 4a series.

Q: Does the Pixel 5 has a microSD card slot?

A: Unfortunately, there’s no microSD expansion here. At least you get 128GB of base storage.

Q: What colors are the Pixel 5 available in?

A: The Pixel 5 will be available in green and black.

Q: Is the Pixel 5 waterproof?

A: The phone has an IP68 rating for water and dust resistance, so it should theoretically survive a dunk in the pool just fine.

Q: Does the Pixel 5 have face unlock and Motion Sense gesture controls?

A: The Pixel 5 lacks both face unlock and gesture controls via Motion Sense hardware. At least you have a fingerprint scanner now.

Q: Does the Pixel 5 support wireless charging?

A: Yes, the phone supports wireless charging up to 12W with a Qi-certified EPP charger.

More coverage

Help other readers out

Please wait.. Loading poll


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Xbox Game Pass: Everything you need to know


xbox game pass

Credit: Microsoft

Xbox Game Pass has been called the “Netflix for video games” by many of its fans. There’s a big reason for that. Major console and PC games are getting more and more expensive. It appears that $ 70 will be the normal price for major games for the upcoming Microsoft Xbox Series X console. However, with this service, Microsoft offers gamers a way to play tons of Xbox One games and Windows 10 games for one low monthly price.

Read more: Is the Xbox Series X backward compatible with Xbox One games?

What is this service, how much does it cost, and is it the perfect way to charge into gaming for both newbies and hardcore gamers? We have all you want to know about Microsoft’s game service, and its beefier brother, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate.

What is Xbox Game Pass?

xbox game pass 1

Credit: Microsoft

Launched in 2017, the subscription service offers over 200 Xbox One compatible games to owners of the console. That includes many of Microsoft’s own first-party games. In 2018, Microsoft announced that it would add its newest first-party games to this service the same date as the games launched for sale. The catalog also includes older Xbox 360 games that are backwards compatible with the Xbox One console. There’s also a separate Game Pass For PC. It includes access to over 200 games for Windows 10-based laptops and desktops. Subscribers also get special game discounts and deals that are not available for non-members.

What is Xbox Game Pass Ultimate?

This more expensive version of the service launched in 2019. In addition to being able to play over 200 Xbox One and Xbox 360 games for a monthly fee, it adds Game Pass for PC as well. Also, Ultimate includes full support for Xbox Live Gold, which enables online multiplayer support for all Xbox games, and free game downloads. In addition to discounts and deals, Ultimate subscribers also get some free in-game content for some games and some deals from third-party partners.

microsoft xcloud

Credit: Microsoft

Finally, the service will be the home for Project xCloud, which will offer over 100 Xbox One and PC games via cloud streaming for Android-based smartphones and tablets. This service will officially go live on September 15.

Read more: Project xCloud – Everything we know

How much does it cost?

Xbox Game Pass costs $ 9.99 a month, and Game Pass for PC also costs $ 9.99 a month. The Ultimate version of the service costs $ 14.99 a month. In that respect, the Ultimate tier is by far the better value, since it combines Xbox Game Pass and Game Pass for PC, plus Xbox Live Gold (a $ 9.99 a month service on its own), plus the upcoming Project xCloud service.

You can also purchase 3, 6 or 12-month digital codes for the service at online retailers, including Amazon.com.

Where is it available?

The service is available in the following countries:

  • Argentina
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Brazil
  • Canada
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • India
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Korea
  • Mexico
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Russia
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Taiwan
  • Turkey
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States

Do I get to keep all of the games if I stop using the service?

No. Once you stop your subscription to Xbox Game Pass, all of the games available on the service are no longer available to you. That includes games you have downloaded to your Xbox One or Windows 10 PC. If you bought DLC items for any game you accessed via the service, they still belong to you. However, you can not use them unless you actually pay for the games.

Do games leave Xbox Game Pass?

Yes. While Microsoft constantly adds new games to the service, it also removes others on a regular basis. You can keep up with Microsoft’s current list of Xbox One, Xbox 360 and PC games on the official Xbox Game Pass web site.

Is there a mobile app for the service?

xbox game pass mobile

Credit: Microsoft

Yes. The Xbox Game Pass mobile app for Android and iOS allows subscribers to keep track of their games. You will also get notifications when new games go live on the service. You can even use the app to order your Xbox One console to download the game if you are not at home. This will allow you to start playing the game when you get back to your house.

In addition, the Android beta version of the app is the way for Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscribers to stream and play games via the xCloud service. That feature is not available on the iOS version of the app.

Does Xbox Game Pass have rivals?

Microsoft is not the only place that offers a way to play a ton of console and PC games for one monthly price.

EA Play

ea play

Credit: Electronic Arts

Electronic Arts recently combined its two-game subscription services, EA Access and Origin Access Basic, into the new brand EA Play. You can play a selection of older EA games for $ 4.99 a month, or $ 29.99 for a year. You can also get access to new EA games before it releases them for 10 hours of free demo time, plus discounts on purchasing full games. It’s available in PC, Xbox One, and Playstation 4 platforms. There’s also EA Play Pro just for PC games, which offers unlimited access to the publisher’s newest games, with all of its extra DLC content. It costs $ 14.99 a month or $ 99.99 a year.

Ubisoft uPlay Plus

ubisoft uplay plus

Credit: Ubisoft

Unlike Xbox Game Pass or EA Play, this service is strictly for PC owners. Publisher Ubisoft offers those gamers access to over 100 gamers for the price of $ 14.99 a month. That price does include new games from Ubisoft the day they are released, plus you get the full versions of those games, including any additional DLC content. It also offers early access and betas for upcoming games.

That’s our look at Microsoft’s Xbox Game Pass subscription service. We will update this article when the company makes changes or adds features to the service.


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Motorola Razr 2: Everything we know right now (Update: Battery specs!)


Moto Razr foldable unfolded screen in hand 1

Update: August 18, 2020 (2:10AM ET): We’ve updated our Motorola Razr 2 rumor hub to include new details of the foldable’s possible battery layout, capacity, and charging speed. Read on for the latest.

Original article: May 20, 2020 (10AM ET): The Motorola Razr reboot captured the imagination of many consumers upon its unveiling last year. The phone was a modern, foldable take on the original Razr flip phone of the 2000s.

Unfortunately, the reboot didn’t enjoy a fantastic critical or commercial reception. That isn’t stopping the company from releasing a follow-up though. From specs and design to availability, here are all the major Motorola Razr 2 rumors in one place.

When is the Motorola Razr 2 launching?

We first got word of the new Razr in early June, when a Lenovo South Africa executive told the Reframed podcast that a “second-generation” Razr was coming. More specifically, the representative said the new foldable phone was supposed to launch around September.

This would mean the Motorola Razr 2 release date is roughly eight months after the first-generation phone, which is a very quick turnaround time.

However, display industry insider Ross Young later tweeted that the new foldable has been delayed by a quarter due to the COVID-19 pandemic. More specifically, Young said the phone was likely pushed out to 2021.

On August 12, Motorola finally teased the Razr 2’s announcement date as September 9, 2020. While not mentioning the Razr by name, the virtual event will “flip the smartphone experience once again,” so it’s safe to assume the launch will include the company’s foldable successor.

Motorola Razr 2 design rumors

Moto Razr foldable half folded moto logo on table

The new foldable phone is expected to offer the same basic form factor as the previous model, so that means a clamshell design with a foldable internal screen and a smaller (non-folding) external display.

However, XDA-Developers reports that the screens will be the same size as the original phone’s displays. That means a 6.2-inch foldable display and a 2.7-inch external screen. Either way, the latter is shaping up to be bigger than the Galaxy Z Flip‘s tiny ticker display.

Meanwhile, display industry insider Ross Young tweeted that the Motorola Razr 2’s screens will both be bigger than the first-generation model. Check out the tweet below.

Nevertheless, here’s hoping the internal screen is more durable than the first Razr. We’d also like to see Motorola bring more features to the external display.

motorola moto razr 2020 odyssey leak

On July 27, leaker Evan Blass added an image to his Patreon detailing potential design tweaks on the upcoming foldable. Dubbed “Odyssey,” the foldable’s external screen remains but boasts a smaller chin with no visible signs of a fingerprint sensor.

Motorola Razr 2 rumored specs

The original Razr offered an upper mid-range Snapdragon 710 chipset that was actually quite old by the time the phone went on sale. In fact, the processor first appeared in phones back in 2018 and was succeeded by the Snapdragon 730 series in mid-2019.

Now, this wouldn’t be a big deal if the Razr was reasonably priced for a foldable, but the phone was extremely expensive upon launch. So critics were understandably annoyed at this. Toss in 6GB of RAM, 128GB of non-expandable storage, a single 16MP main camera, 5MP selfie camera, and a tiny 2,510mAh battery, and you’ve got a phone that seems more like a mid-ranger at best.

XDA-Developers managed to obtain some Razr 2 specs though, and it seems like we’ve got a somewhat improved phone overall. The new device is said to offer a Snapdragon 765 chipset with 5G, 8GB of RAM, 256GB of storage, and a still small 2,845mAh battery. Furthermore, it’s believed that we’ve got a 48MP main camera and a 20MP selfie shooter this time.

More specs leaked on July 2 via Evan Blass, which largely corroborates XDA-Developers‘ initial leak. Blass’ information includes mention of a Nano-SIM and eSIM combo, with a colorway dubbed Mercury Silver. Again, a 20MP selfie camera and 48MP primary camera are also listed.

Certification documents from TUV Rheinland (via MySmartPrice) on August 17 shed light on the possible battery configuration of the Razr 2. The listing suggests the phone could arrive in as many as four variants, but it’s not clear what differentiates these devices.

As for the Razr 2’s battery design, the phone may use two batteries in its folding body with a combined rated capacity of 2,633mAh. The listed 18W charging is also a step up from the 15W charging offered on the first device.

What to expect in terms of pricing?

Moto Razr foldable folded sitting in box speaker

The original Razr launched at an eye-watering $ 1,500, which wasn’t great when you consider the actual spec sheet. Making matters worse was the fact that the cheaper Samsung Galaxy Z Flip seemed to offer better build quality too and overall specs too.

The high price may have contributed to disappointing sales, with Verizon offering a two-for-one Razr deal a couple of months after its initial release.

There’s no word on the Motorola Razr 2 price, but you can bet that the firm doesn’t want to have to resort to a two-for-one deal again in order to shift units. And with foldable phone production expected to drop in price over time, here’s hoping we see a price drop compared to the original Razr.

Availability is another big question mark, as the first model was released in Europe, India, the UK, and the US. Unfortunately, this was a carrier exclusive in the latter two markets (EE and Verizon respectively). There’s no word on carrier exclusivity once again, but it would be a shame if the Motorola Razr 2 turns out to be fantastic but limited to certain networks.


That’s it for our Motorola Razr 2 rumor rundown. Be sure to check back regularly as we update this page! In the meantime, you can check out more noteworthy articles below.


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Samsung One UI 2.5: What we know so far


Samsung Galaxy S20 Android 10 One UI 2

Samsung’s One UI made its debut in 2018 replacing Samsung Experience as the company’s unifying Android skin. Since then, we’ve seen one major update, a number of minor patches, and an interim version (One UI 2.1).

Now, while most Samsung flagships and newer devices run on One UI 2.1, version 2.5 is expected to make its debut this year. Here’s what we know about Samsung’s upcoming Android skin update.

Samsung One UI 2.5: Features

According to a SamMobile report earlier this year, One UI 2.5 could feature further tweaks to its navigation gesture support, including bringing Google’s default Android gestures to third-party launchers.

See also: When should you expect to receive the Android 10 update?

One UI 2.1 brought a slew of camera features to updated devices, including Single Take, Night Hyperlapse, and a Pro Video mode to some devices. Quick Share and Music Share also featured in the update too. It’s not yet clear what One UI 2.5 will bring in this regard.

In a June poll, more than 90% of respondents told us that they really hate Samsung’s advertisements within its default apps, but it’s not clear if the situation will get better or worse with One UI 2.5.

Availability and supported devices

Samsung Galaxy Note 10 hoem screen on windowsill

Expect One UI 2.5 to make its debut on Samsung’s 2020 flagships before any other devices, this includes the Galaxy Note 20 line, the Galaxy Fold 2 (or Galaxy Z Fold 2), and the Galaxy Tab S7 series.

Tweets by leaker Ice Universe and XDA writer Max Weinbach on July 23 suggest that One UI 2.5 will arrive on the Galaxy S20 series “soon.” Weinbach noted that early software testing began earlier in July for the S20 series and the Galaxy Z Flip too.

Samsung’s current flagship series won’t be the only device lines to see the update though. It’s likely that recent Samsung smartphones running Android 10 or One UI 2.1 could receive a push to One UI 2.5.

We may have to draw the line for some older devices though. For instance, the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 recently received the One UI 2.1 update, for instance, but is nearing the end of its two-year major update support cycle. This will likely include the Galaxy S9 series too.

As for devices further down the price ladder, Samsung recently updated the Galaxy A71 and Galaxy A51 to One UI 2.1, so expect the mid-range Samsungs to receive One UI 2.5 a little later.

Looking for the latest and greatest Samsung phones ahead of the release of One UI 2.5? Then you can reserve the Galaxy Note 20 via the button below.


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Did you know: The LG V40 opened the era of modern triple camera phones


LG V40 ThinQ triple camera bump

LG phones might not be at the height of their popularity in 2020, as Samsung, Xiaomi, and others surpass it in terms of critical and commercial success. It’s easy to forget though that the company isn’t afraid to try new things.

Whether it was quad Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC) audio hardware, an ultra-wide camera, or manual video functionality, the South Korean manufacturer has brought quite a few things to the table. In fact, it might surprise you to know that the company was the first to offer a modern triple camera phone in the LG V40 ThinQ.

Cameras increase in number

Smartphones were stuck on single rear cameras for the longest time, with the exception of dual camera phones from HTC and LG in 2011. The HTC Evo 3D and LG Optimus 3D both used the secondary camera for 3D effects though. We also saw another early dual camera effort with the HTC One M7 in 2013, which delivered depth effects and 3D-style photos too.

However, it was 2016 that saw dual-camera solutions truly embraced by the industry at large, as we saw a variety of useful secondary cameras emerge. Huawei touted a monochrome secondary camera, while LG went ultra-wide, and Apple went for a telephoto zoom camera. The latter two setups gave you entirely different perspectives too, making for a more versatile camera experience than ever before.

It used to be the case that you had to choose between ultra-wide and telephoto cameras rather than having both.

This led to an interesting dilemma though, as it meant you had to choose which perspective you valued more. Do you go for the ultra-wide secondary camera for group photos and cityscapes? Or do you opt for a telephoto camera that lets you get closer without having to physically get closer?

This dilemma persisted for a long time, as dual camera adoption increased in 2017 and 2018. But it was in October 2018 that LG finally gave consumers the best of both worlds.

Enter the LG V40

LG V40 ThinQ rear panel

The LG V40 launched in early October of 2018, and it changed the game by offering a triple rear camera setup.

Now, this wasn’t the first phone to offer a triple rear camera arrangement, with the Huawei P20 Pro launching earlier that year. However, it was the first phone to offer the now standard main/zoom/ultra-wide camera trio. Meanwhile, the P20 Pro opted for a main/zoom/monochrome combination that hasn’t been used by others in the industry.

LG’s late 2018 flagship wielded a 12MP main, 16MP ultra-wide, and 12MP 2x telephoto sensor. This meant that you had a camera for every occasion. On safari and want to get a decent shot of that animal in the distance? Then the telephoto can help. Going sightseeing and want to get that entire landscape or building in one photo? That’s where the ultra-wide comes in. In other words, you didn’t have to buy the LG G7 if you wanted an ultra-wide shooter or an iPhone or Xiaomi Mi 8 if you wanted good zoom — the V40 had it all.

Related: Want a phone with a great camera? Here’s what to look for.

The biggest downside to the LG V40 though was the fact that image quality wasn’t good in anything other than broad daylight. This hasn’t changed much with subsequent firmware updates, as our own Ryan-Thomas Shaw noted in his LG V40 retrospective. However, Ryan did appreciate the background blur from the main camera (no bokeh mode required), as well as the dynamic range and color reproduction for the most part.

LG also stood out from others by offering two selfie cameras, featuring a 5MP ultra-wide shooter and an 8MP primary lens. In other words, you had a total of five cameras on board.

Life after triple cameras

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra back at angle

The LG V40 was the first triple camera phone with a truly flexible setup back then, but it’s clear that rivals thought it was a path worth following too. After all, the similarly equipped Huawei Mate 20 Pro and quad camera-toting Samsung Galaxy A9 both launched mere days after LG’s phone.

And the trend would only continue in 2019, as Apple, Huawei, Samsung, Xiaomi, and others all released phones with the normal/wide/telephoto camera setup. In fact, some brands have even gone so far as to implement quad- or penta-camera setups.

Some of these extra cameras include macro cameras for shooting extreme close-ups of things, depth sensors and 3D Time-of-Flight sensors for depth of field effects, and additional zoom cameras for long-range zoom capabilities. Nevertheless, the normal/wide/telephoto trio is what you should expect on most high-end phones today. Anything more would be a bonus.

The LG V40 marked an important stage in the evolution of smartphone photography, joining other recent additions like periscope cameras and night modes.


This is the fourth post in our “Did you know” series, in which we dive into the Android history books to uncover important and interesting facts or events that have been forgotten over time. What do you want to see us cover next? Let us know in the comments.


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Motorola Edge Plus: All the rumors and what we know so far


Motorola Moto One Zoom home screen in hand 1

Motorola hasn’t released a solid premium flagship competitor in several years. Motorola President Sergio Buniac announced in December that that would change in early 2020. We expect this will come in the form of the rumored Motorola Edge Plus.

Unfortunately, the company seems to have done a decent job of keeping leaks at bay, so there isn’t much we know about the device yet. For now, this is everything we expect from Motorola’s upcoming flagship.

Related: Here’s how Motorola’s next flagship can take the fight to Samsung, Huawei

Motorola Edge Plus: Name and design

Moto 5G Snapdragon 765 Phone 2020XDA Developers

We have yet to see any renders or pictures of the Motorola Edge Plus come through Android Authority, though we have caught a glimpse of the device’s rumored mid-tier counterpart (pictured above). What we do know is that the device is rumored to come with one of 2019’s most polarizing features: a waterfall display.

This feature is likely one of the things that led to the device’s rumored Motorola Edge Plus name. It’s also possible the device could come with the “Motorola One 2020” moniker, but we will stick with the Edge Plus title for now.

Read also: Motorola Moto G8, G8 Power, G8 Stylus renders surface online

Recent rumors suggest the device could come with a hole-punch selfie camera at the top left corner. This camera cutout should be smaller than the ones seen on Motorola’s previous phones like the Motorola One Vision.

Aside from that, we can also expect Motorola to include some of the other staple premium flagship design features we’ve come to expect from recent devices. This could consist of a glass and metal chassis, thin bezels, or some form of biometric authentication, whether that be a fingerprint scanner or facial recognition sensor.

Motorola Edge Plus: Specs and features

Motorola Moto One Hyper back and fingerprint reader

We expect the Motorola Edge Plus to come with a 6.67-inch, 2,340 X 1,080 waterfall display. This display should run to the edges of the device, and it will most likely support a 90Hz display refresh rate. It’s also expected to come with Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon 865, 8GB or 12GB of RAM, a 5,170mAh battery, and Android 10.

The device should also tout 5G support, and Motorola President Buniac said it would be the “fastest 5G phone on Qualcomm’s flagship platform” with “5G speeds greater than 5Gbps.” Other than that, we are unaware of the rest of the device’s hardware specs.

Motorola could take this opportunity to launch several new applications as well.

Software, on the other hand, is another story. Motorola could take this opportunity to launch several new applications with the phone, including Moto Edge Assistant, Moto Gametime, and Moto Audio.

Moto Edge Assistant will reportedly help users take full advantage of the new curved display. This app should allow them to tweak and customize tap actions on the edges of the screen.

Moto Gametime should introduce a customizable toolbar for users to easily access settings and other tools useful during gaming sessions. Some of these features could include notification blocking, brightness locking, and more. Users should be able to access this toolbar with a tap of a floating button or swipe in from one of the device edges.

Read also: Best Motorola phones at every price point

Moto Audio should allow the Motorola Edge Plus to tune audio profiles to match specific types of content automatically. It could boost voice clarity during calls or increase the bass while you play music. This would be possible thanks to the various audio profiles for gaming, movies, music, and more.

Motorola Edge Plus: Price and release date

Motorola Moto One Zoom notch and earpiece speaker

We expected Motorola to announce the Motorola Edge Plus on February 23, a day ahead of the official start of Mobile World Congress 2020. Unfortunately, this year’s MWC event was canceled due to concerns surrounding the current coronavirus outbreak.

Since the initial event date was scheduled for just over a week away from now, Motorola could unveil the Edge Plus at any time within the next couple of weeks. We don’t know where the device will be made available, but we hope to see a global rollout with this handset.

Read also: The Motorola Razr is back: Is this the foldable you were waiting for?

We haven’t heard any rumors on pricing yet either, but we expect this device will fall within a premium territory. However, we don’t expect it to come anywhere near the new Galaxy S20 series or even Motorola’s new Razr foldable. It’s more likely that the device will fall somewhere between the $ 700-$ 900 price range, though that’s just speculation at this point.


Those are all the details we have on the Motorola Edge Plus so far! Be sure to bookmark this page and check back often as we will update it with new information as we get our hands on it.

More posts about Motorola


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

All the latest Android developer news and features you need to know about


Android Studio

December has been a relatively quiet month in the world of Android development, with fewer posts over at the Android Developers blog than usual, and many other sites taking a break for the holidays. Hey, devs need a break every now and then too!

That said, there have still been a few exciting announcements to cover, including the release of a new Android Game SDK, and a powerful code search tool. Consider this a case of quality-over-quantity, then. Read below for the full scoop.

News and announcements

Code Search with Cross References for the Android Open Source Project – Google announces what may prove an extremely useful tool for Android developers: a search engine for code. See more below.

Android Game SDK

From Google

Android Game SDK – Android Game SDK offers a selection of libraries direct from Google to enhance game development on the platform. The first library that will land as part of this new initiative is designed to help developers with frame pacing.

The Frame Pacing Library will use Android’s Choreographer API to synchronize with the display system. This helps ensure frames appear when they should, to avoid buffering and stuttering, and to keep audio in-pace.

Android 10 on Android TV – Pretty much this article is what it says on the tin. On December 10, Google brought Android API level 29 to Android TV. This will mean faster updates through Project Treble, more secure storage, and other goodies from the latest iteration of Android.

Another new TV-centric feature for developers is ADT-3. This is a dongle aimed at developers to test their apps on the platform. It will be made available soon, and you can be sure to find out about it here in the coming months.

Features and resources from around the web

Making an app with no programming experience: What are your options?This post explores how you might set about developing an app with no coding skills. It covers app builders, as well as numerous other options.

Code SearchCode Search is a new tool from Google that has the potential to be extremely useful. This is a search engine that focuses specifically on Android code, sorting through git repositories like github, gitweb, etc. What’s unique about this, is that you can actually search within the code itself for specific commands or keywords. In short, you can actually view the code before you decide if you might be interested in using it.

Android Code Search

We all know that programming is essentially a process of lifting bits of code and stitching them together like a Frankenstein’s monster (right?). This has potentially to streamline that process considerably!

Kotlin/Everywhere – it’s a wrap! At Google I/O, Google announced it would be increasingly placing the focus of Android development on Kotlin. Kotlin/Everywhere was a series of events discussing the language. This post includes links to various talks and resources for those that missed the live events.

Workplace for Kotlin code in IDEThis post shares a method for testing snippets of Kotlin code without deploying your entire app, via REPL.

Lost Crypt 2D sample project for Unity – Unity has introduced a host of new 2D features pertinent to Android developers over recent months. This new sample project serves as a useful demonstration of how best to use them.

Lost Crypt Android Developer News

From Unity

Speed up your Android dynamic features flow testing – Dynamic delivery has a lot of uses for devs and can enhance the user experience significantly. However, testing these features can be tricky. This post explains the solution, using the Gradle Play Publisher plugin.

Gesture Navigation: Insets – Insets help to improve gesture navigation by avoiding conflicts with existing UI features.

Migrating from Fingerprint Manager to BiometricPrompt – A handy guide (pun intended) to switching to the newish AndroidX Biometric Library.

And that’s it – see you next month!

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

PinePhone: Everything you need to know about the $150 Linux-powered phone


Pine64 PinePhonePine64

It’s no secret that two operating systems hold the lion’s share of the mobile market — Android and iOS. This current duopoly doesn’t give users much choice in the way of OS offerings, even though there is no shortage of hardware. In the past, Microsoft tried to break into the market to no avail, and Huawei will release its own offering soon enough.

But what if there was another alternative, one that’s more privacy-respecting and encourages tinkering? Enter the PinePhone by Pine64. This device isn’t quite ready for the mass market yet, but if you are looking for a unique alternative to Android and iOS devices, you’ll want to keep an eye on this one.

The company behind the PinePhone

Pine64 PINE A64 specsPine64

Pine64 is a small, community-driven company that specializes in developing ARM devices. It began by producing single-board computers similar to the Raspberry Pi. Eventually, the company also started developing laptops that run on these single-board computers, and now the company is branching into the mobile phone market — hence the PinePhone. Pine64 also plans on releasing a smartwatch and a tablet in the future, but those are conversations for another day.

What exactly is the PinePhone?

Pine64 PinePhone front back anglesPine64

The PinePhone is a fully open-sourced smartphone, and it is Pine64’s most ambitious project to date. And unlike most devices you can get buy today, Pine64 didn’t design the PinePhone to run Android or iOS. The company developed the device to run Linux.

The PinePhone may be a little too complicated for the average consumer.

We don’t know for sure which specific operating system the consumer-ready device will ship with, but Pine64 says it supports all available major Linux phone projects. Some notable projects include Ubuntu Touch, Sailfish OS, and Plasma Mobile. Each OS comes with its own pros and cons, and that variety is one of the PinePhone’s competitive advantages.

Users can choose which platform best suits their needs instead of simply using the one manufacturers want them to use. That means, depending on what OS they choose, they may have a vastly different experience from someone else who chooses a different OS for their PinePhone. On the flip side, users may have to load these operating systems on the device themselves, making the PinePhone a little too complicated for the average consumer.

What about the PinePhone specs?

Pine64 PinePhone SpecsPine64

The PinePhone will come in at a grand total of $ 150, and the specs match that price tag. It will come with the Allwinner A64 quad-core SoC, Mali 400 MP2 GPU, 2GB of RAM, and a 2,000mAh battery.

The display will be a 5.95-inch 1,440×720 LCD panel. The rear camera will tout a 5MP shooter, while the selfie camera sports a measly 2MP sensor.

You shouldn’t get this device if you are looking for high-end specs.

It will also include a USB-C charging port, a headphone jack, and a plastic chassis. Altogether, the device will weigh somewhere between 180 and 200 grams. Needless to say, you shouldn’t get this device if you are looking for high-end specs.

Will it run my favorite mobile apps?

Red Magic 3S play store

The answer to this question is not as simple as we might hope. Depending on which OS you choose, you will get access to vastly different application libraries. Some of the supported operating systems aim to include full Linux app support. Others want to develop their own mobile app ecosystem.

Expect to make some sacrifices as far as mobile app selection is concerned.

Thanks to Ubuntu Touch’s emphasis on web apps, it probably offers the most complete mobile app ecosystem out of the box. Sailfish OS’ native apps leave much to be desired, but it allows users to install some Android apps on specific devices. Hopefully, the PinePhone will get this ability too.

Other than that, app options are limited with the other offerings. If you are thinking about purchasing this device, expect to make some sacrifices as far as mobile app selection is concerned.

What is the PinePhone’s launch date, price, and availability?

Pine64 PinePhone BraveHeart EditionPine64

Right now, you can preorder a version of the device called the BraveHeart Edition, though I wouldn’t recommend you buy one. Pine64 made this version of the PinePhone solely for developers and early adopters, and it is not daily driver material.

The consumer-ready version will retail for $ 150, and Pine64 says it will launch sometime in Spring 2020. The device will ship worldwide, but some markets may be subject to extra shipping costs.


I don’t know about you, but I am pumped about this device. The idea of a completely open-source smartphone that is designed to be tinkered with excites me like none other.

Am I expecting the Pinephone to replace everyone’s Android device? Absolutely not. But do I think you should purchase one anyway? I do. It will only cost about as much as the average smart display, and it has the potential to expand our imaginations into what mobile computing could look like, not just what it is.

What about you? Are you excited about this device? Let us know in the poll below, and tell us why or why not in the comments section.

Please wait.. Loading poll


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Related Sites

Powered by WP Robot

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