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Samsung Galaxy S20 review: What more could you want?


The regular Samsung Galaxy S20 may not grab the same headlines as its Galaxy S20 Ultra and Galaxy S20 Plus relatives, but it’s still equipped with much of the same advanced mobile technology. Priced at a slightly more reasonable $ 999 than the $ 1,399 S20 Ultra, the Galaxy S20 is likely to be most consumer’s entry point to this year’s flagship series.

This makes the Galaxy S20 an even more important handset for Samsung than in previous years. It has to prove that the cheapest S20 isn’t an afterthought and can still provide a flagship experience — especially when even more affordable mid-tier 5G smartphones are chomping at Samsung’s heels.

Samsung Galaxy S20 review notes: I reviewed the European Samsung Galaxy S20 (SM-G980F) on the 4G Giffgaff network in the U.K. over the course of a week. On March 23, Samsung issued an update to version G980FXXU1ATCH, which improved the camera and general performance. All of the images in this review were taken post update. Android Authority purchased the Samsung Galaxy S20 unit used for this review.

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What’s in the box?

Samsung Galaxy S20 box contents

The Samsung Galaxy S20 comes with the predictable assortment of accessories. The handset ships with a 25W charging plug, UBS-C to USB-C cable, a SIM ejector tool, and a pair of AKG USB-C earbuds.

Sadly, there’s isn’t a screen protector or case included. That’s definitely something you’ll want to source yourself if you’re accident prone, given the phone’s glass back.

Shaking up a classic design

  • 151.7 x 69.1 x 7.9mm
  • 163g
  • IP68 water & dust protection

I’ve been quite critical of Samsung’s design change. The iconic waterfall display is now flattened and the camera housing has morphed into a rectangular blob. The S20’s looks aren’t going to please everyone, but I can’t say all my complaints apply to the more compact form factor of the standard Samsung Galaxy S20.

As far as the essentials go, the smaller Galaxy S20 is ideal. Featuring a classic combination of glass and metal trim, it’s light but sturdy, and actually grips much better without the curved waterfall display. The slippery nature of the glass back isn’t a problem when it’s easy to wrap your hand around the whole device. Single-handed use is effortless. The volume rocker and power buttons are located exactly where you want them to be.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Side 1

Aesthetically, the Samsung Galaxy S20 is a decent looker. The rectangular camera module houses only three lenses, so it’s slimmer than the S20 Plus and Ultra models. Shaving off a few millimeters may be a small change, but it makes the handset look more slick than its bulky siblings.

I’m not entirely sold on Samsung’s choice of colors for this generation, although the Cloud Blue version I have is a vast improvement on the Cosmic Gray. The coating reflects a shimmery rainbow of colors in the right light, which helps brighten up the handset a bit.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Selfie Camera

The Galaxy S20 provides the perks of a big screen while still being sleek and lightweight.

The Galaxy S20 boasts an Infinity-O display panel. A single punch hole reveals the selfie camera. The big black dot doesn’t exactly gel with the whites and grays of Samsung’s UI, but you’ll eventually stop noticing it. Overall, I think I prefer it to a notch. Just about.

The camera offers rudimentary face unlock security; you won’t find any fancy infrared face scanning tech here. For the best security, you’ll probably want to use the ultrasonic fingerprint scanner embedded in the screen. From a users point of view it works just like a regular fingerprint scanner, you just need to press on the right spot on the screen. However, it’s powered by ultrasonic sound waves that bounce of your fingerprints rather than a capacitive touch sensor.

Samsung Galaxy S20 USB C port 1

Samsung’s entire S20 range abandoned the 3.5mm headphone jack, including this smaller model. However, with consumers increasingly embracing Bluetooth audio, and a pair of USB-C AKG buds in the box, this isn’t quite the inconvenience it was a couple of years ago.

On the plus side, Samsung removed the Bixby button from the Galaxy S20 series. Instead, just hold down the power button to activate Bixby Voice. If you’re not a fan of Bixby, you can switch this long-press option to bring up the shutdown menu instead.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Hero 1

Overall, the Samsung Galaxy S20 just feels right, both in usability and aesthetics. The phone’s impressive screen-to-body ratio means I didn’t feel like I lost any screen real estate moving down from a bigger handset. The standard S20 certainly isn’t a compact smartphone, but it’s much more user-friendly than the gargantuan 6.9-inch Ultra version.

The best mobile display to date

  • 6.2-inch Quad HD+ (3,200 x 1,400), 20:9 aspect ratio
  • Samsung Infinity-O Dynamic AMOLED
  • Corning Gorilla Glass 6

Every year Samsung produces a top tier display for its flagships and the Galaxy S20 is no different. The 6.2-inch panel features an optional 120Hz refresh rate for smoother scrolling and frame rates in supported games.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Display 2

The 120Hz mode looks silky smooth flicking through menus and walls of text, though it’s definitely more of a quality of life improvement than an essential upgrade. The option to switch to Quad HD+ from the Full HD+ default resolution is a minimal difference visually, and it does suck down more juice. As such, I stuck with the Full HD+ 60Hz default setting for the majority of my time with the phone. I’d rather have the slightly longer battery life.

The simply sublime quality of the display is the real story here. The panel is punchy and crisp, providing excellent colors for a wide range of content. HDR10+ support is a nice bonus, too, and one that has a noticeable impact on quality when viewing supported content. Samsung’s latest display technology does not disappoint.

Top-tier performance

  • Octa-core Samsung Exynos 990 / Octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 865
  • 8GB RAM
  • 128GB storage
  • microSD card slot

As you’d expect from a modern flagship smartphone, performance is excellent even when multitasking in and out of several apps at once. I have the Exynos model, which is a tad slower than the Snapdragon variant, but I certainly don’t have any complaints about day-to-day use.

Our benchmark results place the handset comfortably ahead of last year’s flagship phones, for both general app and gaming performance. Particularly, the Exynos 990’s Mongoose M5 monstrous single core score stands out. The Galaxy S20 handles everything you can throw at it, though if you’re after the best performing phone we’ve tested so far, it’s a fraction behind the Snapdragon 865 Galaxy S20 Ultra.

I did notice that our Exynos model became a little warm when put under strain, such as when downloading numerous apps in the background or when taking lots of pictures in quick succession. Heat certainly wasn’t an issue for everyday tasks.

All-day battery life

  • 4,000mAh
  • 25W fast charging with USB PD 3.0
  • 15W wireless charging (9W reverse)

Without 5G technology on board chugging down power, our 4G-only Samsung Galaxy S20 pushed through a full day of heavy use with capacity to spare. I couldn’t wear the phone down with two and a half hours of Spotify, an hour of YouTube, two and a half hours of web browsing, messaging, and a decent camera session thrown in. Talk about impressive.

I calculated just over 6 hours of screen on time with the phone. Your mileage will vary depending on gaming habits, screen brightness, and the number of background apps you have running. Fresh installs always tend to run a bit longer after all. The phone’s standby time is also pretty good, losing less than 5% overnight.

Even if you somehow manage to run the phone’s battery down to zero, the 25W wired charging solution has you back on your feet in no time. It’s not the fastest charging brick out there, but the Galaxy S20 still manages a 41% charge in 20 minutes, 56% in 30 minutes, and a full charge in 71 minutes.

It’s virtually impossible to wear the battery down in a single day.

Overall I’m impressed with the Galaxy S20’s battery life. Be warned: the 5G model won’t perform quite this well.

A complete camera package

  • Main: 12MP f/1.76, 26mm
  • Tele: 3x optical 64MP f/1.72
  • Wide: 12MP f/2.2, 13mm

The Samsung Galaxy S20 features a simplified camera arrangement compared to its larger siblings. However, you still get a highly versatile package, comprising high resolution, wide angle, and telephoto cameras.

The main camera has a healthy sized 1/1.76-inch sensor that handles a wide range of shooting environments well. The ultra-wide angle camera has the same resolution, with a 13mm focal length and Super Steady video feature. The more interesting option is the telephoto camera, which offers a whopping 64MP resolution and 3x optical zoom. The camera only shoots at 12MP by default, but you can switch to 64MP for some extra crop factor. You might expect the 64MP sensor to bin to 16MP, which is surely the case, but Samsung’s compresses to a consistent 12MP output from all three cameras.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Rear Triple Camera 1

It was a little bit tricky to take a wide variety of shots while self isolating, but we gave it a go. The images below have been resized for bandwidth. You can view the originals here.

To start, daylight shots are as good as you would expect. Exposure and detail come out nicely virtually every time. The auto HDR feature is particularly impressive, avoiding over and under exposure in nearly all scenarios, although you do get the odd blurry image. My only criticism is that the color saturation is often dialed up too high, meaning results don’t always look perfectly realistic.

That said, the telephoto and wide-angle cameras aren’t as clean as the main camera. They’re more heavily processed and don’t deliver as much detail when cropping in. There’s also some distortion noticeable around the edges of the wide-angle lens, particularly chromatic aberration and purple fringing, though it’s not as bad as some other phones.

The Galaxy S20 features 3x optical zoom, which extends all the way up to a 30x Space Zoom (aka digital zoom). It’s passable up to about 10x, albeit with some loss of detail, and that’s more zoom than you’ll ever really need. The 20x and 30x options are basically useless.

The phone also includes some fun shooting options, such as Live Focus for bokeh and other effects. However, the Galaxy S20’s edge detection leaves a lot to be desired. You can easily spot foreground smudges and failed edges in the images below. This is where the time of flight sensor on the S20 Plus and Ultra would be nice to have.

The Single Take setting is rather more useful. Simply activate and point at your ongoing scene and Samsung’s software pulls out a range of shots and videos for you to prune through. It’s a great way to make sure you don’t miss any action.

The Galaxy S20 offers a camera for every scenario.

Low light performance is where we separate the wheat from the chaff. The Galaxy S20 is quite passable here, but does have its issues. Images aren’t the cleanest in very low light and you won’t find much detail in the pictures. Exposure and colors are pretty good, at least as far as the main camera goes. Sadly, the telephoto and wide-angle camera don’t perform anywhere near as well in low light and the results often come out underexposed.

Focusing in low light is a bigger problem for the handset. You’ll have to fight your way through a few blurry pictures before landing an in-focus shot. It’s an issue we’ve noted across all the Galaxy S20 models — and it still hasn’t been fixed with the latest update.

Night Mode On Night Mode Off Night Mode On

Night Mode Off

Night Mode On Night Mode Off Night Mode On

Night Mode Off

Night mode helps out in the darkest environments and can even make the wide angle camera take passable shots. Samsung’s technology seems every bit as competent as competing solutions in terms of improving exposure. However, the results tend to look a little too heavily processed, with over-sharpening artifacts quite noticeable around high contrast edges.

Finally, the selfie camera is better than most. It captures a fair amount of detail and handles exposure very well. The wide-angle option when two or more people are detected is a nice touch too. Again, though, the front camera doesn’t nail colors particularly well. My skin tone constantly came out far too pink in outdoor lighting and there’s a slight color tint towards the bottom of the photo.

On the whole, Samsung’s latest camera setup is competent but has some shortcomings. The consistent color over-saturation is far too heavy for my tastes, though it might suit those who want bold images without with the hassle of editing. The wide-angle and telephoto cameras look great at full frame, but rely heavily on sharpening to try to clean up the images.

The hit and miss nature of the bokeh portrait and low-light pictures hasn’t helped win me over either. While certainly versatile and capable of taking excellent snaps, there are more consistent camera packages out there. The most serious camera enthusiasts may want to check out the trusty Google Pixel 4 or the Huawei P40 series instead.

Samsung One UI is getting there

Samsung Galaxy S20 Apps 1

If you’re familiar with Samsung then you’ll know what to expect when it comes to One UI. Staple features like Edge Panels, Bixby, and quick access to your Smart Things devices are all present. The heavily customized look and overall style hasn’t changed since last year either.

The latest One UI 2.1 version improves Samsung’s recent formula. There’s a system-wide dark theme; Samsung Daily news aggregate marks an upgrade over Bixby Home; and there’s Samsung’s Good Lock app if you fancy more control over customization. Menus and animations are slick, and notifications aren’t overly intrusive. Day to day, One UI is a pleasure to use.

Samsung packs a lot into One UI, arguably too much.

However, navigating menus to tweak your desired setting is still arduous. Figuring out how to disable Bixby, for example, requires navigating to the “advanced features” menu. Your best bet is to stick with the search function rather than try to guess where everything is.

For someone who isn’t a Samsung regular and not invested in the company’s larger ecosystem, the sheer range of features and options feels overwhelming. I know I won’t ever use the vast majority, and it leaves One UI feeling more bloated than some other Android skins.

Samsung Galaxy S20 review: Specs

  Samsung Galaxy S20
Display 6.2-inch Dynamic AMOLED
3,200 x 1,440
20:9 ratio
120Hz refresh rate at 1080p
60Hz refresh rate at 1440p
HDR10+ certified
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 or Samsung Exynos 990
RAM 12GB
Storage 128GB
MicroSD Yes, up to 1TB
Battery 4,000mAh
Fast wired and wireless charging
Cameras Rear:
– Wide-angle: 12MP, 1/1.76″, ƒ/1.8, 1.8µm
– Telephoto: 64MP, ƒ/2.0, .8µm
– Ultra-wide: 12MP, ƒ/2.2, 1.4µm

3x hybrid optical/digital zoom, Super Resolution Zoom up to 30x

Front:
– 10MP, ƒ/2.2, 1.22µm, AF

Connectivity 4G LTE support
5G (sub-6GHz, DSS, TDD/FDD, SA and NSA, no mmWave)
Operating System One UI 2.0
Android 10
Water resistance IP68
Security Ultrasonic fingerprint sensor, face unlock
Color Cosmic Grey, Cloud Blue, Cloud Pink
Dimensions and weight 69.1×151.7×7.9mm
163g

Value for money

It’s hard to talk about value for money at the $ 1,000 price point. You’d rightly expect all the latest bells and whistles for that kind of money. The Samsung Galaxy S20 covers all the flagship essentials, but doesn’t pack in the company’s best camera tech such as a time-of-flight or 108MP sensor. With other models in the range pushing $ 1,400, however, we need to keep some perspective.

With 5G and some new tech on board, you can probably justify the $ 100 price increase from last year’s Galaxy S10. However, the 4G-only model (only available in some countries) is a much more competitive prospect.

Samsung Galaxy S20 The latest and greatest from Samsung
The Samsung Galaxy S20, Galaxy S20 Plus, and Galaxy S20 Ultra are super-premium 5G smartphones from the South Korean company. No matter what you’re looking for, the Galaxy S20 line likely has something to suit your needs.

The 4G Samsung Galaxy S20 we tested costs £799/€899 (~$ 918), a full £100/€100 cheaper than the 5G model. Compared to the more expensive entries in the S20 series, the 4G S20 model retains most of the best features at some welcome savings. You get a lot of bang for your buck, especially if you’re not planning to upgrade to 5G for a couple of years.

Apple has a more affordable flagship entry point with last year’s $ 699 iPhone 11. Although, to be fair, the $ 999 iPhone 11 Pro is the Galaxy S20’s true competition. Compared to other 5G Android flagships, the Galaxy S20 is more expensive than the LG V60 and last year’s OnePlus 7 Pro 5G. If you’re not yet ready to make the jump to 5G, the Google Pixel 4 is regularly discounted for even bigger savings. 2019 handsets are still great for 4G networks , so it’s well worth considering your actual needs before taking the plunge on more expensive 5G flagship models.

Should you buy the Samsung Galaxy S20?

The Samsung Galaxy S20 is every bit a flagship phone as the Plus and Ultra models, and one of the best phones available right now. $ 999 is a lot of money for any smartphone, but the Galaxy S20 justifies that price pretty well. It’s jam packed with the latest tech and is only missing a few minor features found in its more expensive counterparts.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Rear Camera 2

The Samsung Galaxy S20 is one of the best smartphones you can buy right now.

Unless you really need a humongous display and more zoom from your camera, it’s quite hard to justify spending hundreds more dollars on the broader Galaxy S20 range. The Galaxy S20 Plus justifies its $ 1,199 price tag, but I think the Galaxy S20 is the better deal for $ 200 or $ 300 less.

The Samsung Galaxy S20 doesn’t have the absolute best camera, but it packs in everything else. Whether you’re a power user or social media butterfly, this phone won’t leave you wanting for anything. If you’re on board with this year’s redesign, the Samsung Galaxy S20 is one of the best smartphones you can buy right now.

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Camera shootout: Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs Apple iPhone 11 Max Pro


Last fall, Apple came out swinging with the iPhone 11 Pro Max. The fruit company’s latest flagship has an advanced triple-camera system meant to provide users with the ultimate mobile photography experience. Samsung rose to meet the challenge with its Galaxy S20 series, and the Galaxy S20 Ultra in particular. This new phone boasts one of the most capable multi-camera systems in the market. Is one better than the other? Find out in our Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max camera shootout.

Note: All the sample photos in our article have been resized for display purposes. Full-resolution samples are available here.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Specs

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs Apple iPhone Pro Max 3

Before we dive into the photos, let’s take a gander at the hardware. Each device has a complex system stuck on the back, with myriad cameras working together to produce results.

The Galaxy S20 Ultra’s main shooter captures 108MP at f/1.8. Of note: it has a really large 1/1.33 sensor, which lets it capture a lot of light. This is what powers its nighttime features. Shots taken with this camera are binned down by a factor of nine (nona-binning) to 12MP each, but the full resolution is available with the press of a button. The telephoto camera snaps 48MP shots at f/3.5, the ultra-wide snaps 12MP shots at f/2.2, and the selfie camera snaps 40MP shots (binned to 10MP) at f/2.2. A time-of-flight (ToF) sensor helps with depth information. That’s a lot of sensors and lenses.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera module profile

Apple’s approach is similar though not quite the same. The iPhone 11 Pro Max has a three-camera setup on the rear. Apple opted for three 12MP sensors for the ultra-wide, standard, and telephoto cameras. The ultra-wide enjoys an aperture of f/2.4 and a 120-degree field of view, while the standard camera has an aperture of f/1.8, and the 2x optical zoom telephoto offers an aperture of f/2.0. These are joined by a 12MP selfie camera at f/2.2. Apple does not use a ToF sensor, nor does it use pixel-binning.

iPhone 11 Pro Max Camera

Samsung and Apple rely on entirely different processing platforms. The S20 Ultra, for example, relies on the Snapdragon 865 system-on-a-chip. The 865 provides a range of advanced imaging tools, including machine learning and a dedicated image signal processor. Apple, on the other hand, uses its home-grown A13 Bionic chip with a third-generation neural engine.

Pitting the performance of these two processors head to head is not exactly an (ahem) apples-to-apples comparison, so we’re not going to deliver a verdict here. We do know, however, that the Snapdragon 865 bested the A13 on some benchmarks.

See also: Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra review | Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max review


Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Apps and features

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs Apple iPhone Pro Max 2

Specs are important at determining the results, but the software is often doing most of the work. How are the camera apps from Samsung and Apple?

Both Samsung and Apple have straight-forward camera applications that make it a breeze to find and use features. A double-press of the power button launches the camera app of the S20 Ultra, but there’s no way to truly rapidly launch the iPhone camera app. The best you can do is wake the screen and tap the camera shortcut on the lock screen. I wish Apple had a speedier method.

Samsung simplified its camera UI recently in One UI 2.0. The shutter button is located prominently, with camera modes and zoom tools nearby. I like that Samsung makes certain controls (flash, timer, aspect ratio, etc.) a breeze to adjust with a few quick taps. Shooting modes include photo, video, Single Take, pro, panorama, food, night, live focus (portrait), live focus video, pro video, super slow-mo, slow-mo, and hyperlapse.

The most significant mode is Single Take, which records up to 10 seconds of video and then automatically generates up to nine different photo/video file types for sharing.

Apple has long offered a dead-simple camera app to iPhone users. The main viewfinder offers easy access to the wide-angle, standard, and 2x telephoto lenses, as well as the bevy of shooting modes. These include photo, video, time-lapse, slow-mo, portrait, and panorama. The far side of the viewfinder is where you’ll find buttons for the flash, live photos, and the timer.

While the Samsung app has more overall features, the Apple app is a touch easier to use. With these in mind, we’ll call the Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max camera app comparison a draw.

Winner: Tie


Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Camera shootout


Daylight

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample tracks and falls Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample bridge falls Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample tracks and falls

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample bridge falls

Daylight shots are where every camera should shine. There’s not a lot of greenery around just yet, but I did take the Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max comparison outdoors to see what’s what.

In these shots, you’ll see blue skies, brown trees, gray gravel, and lots of contrast. In fact, the iPhone shots are over contrast-y if you ask me. The S20 Ultra shots have less contrast but also a touch less color. In this series, I prefer the S20’s results over the iPhone’s, particularly because they are more in line with what my eyes saw when I took the pictures.

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


Detail

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample wide angle tracks Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample wide tracks Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample wide angle tracks

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample wide tracks

The amount of detail visible in these photos depends almost entirely on the exposure. For example, the S20 used a brighter exposure and thus lost some detail. In other instances, the S20’s brighter shot retains detail where the iPhone’s darker shot did not. More importantly, when you zoom in on these photos, the level of visible detail in the gravel and wood grain is about even. There’s no clear winner in this category.

Winner: Tie


Portrait/selfie

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample portrait Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample portrait Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample portrait

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample portrait

The Galaxy S20 Ultra has a time-of-flight sensor, which should help to take superior portraits, right? This isn’t necessarily the case.

As you can see in the samples here, the S20 was able to define me from the background very well, with a few rough edges here and there (look at my coat sleeve). The background is properly exposed, but my face looks overly pink. Worse, I’m not entirely in focus.

The iPhone did a slightly better job. My coat sleeve is smoother along the edges, and my face is much sharper. More to the point, color is a tad more accurate and there’s more detail in the background and foreground. Last, my face isn’t over-beautified.

As for selfies, the S20 messes up in a few ways. First, it mirrors the scene, meaning everything is backwards (you can see the reversed text on my jacket). You have to dive into the selfie camera settings to switch this. Second, the S20 smoothes over my skin a bit too much. The iPhone simply delivers here, whether it’s focus, color, bokeh effect, or temperature.

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample selfie Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample selfie Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample selfie

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample selfie

Again, it’s only by a hair, but I’m going with the iPhone this time around.

Winner: Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max

See also: Best Android phones for taking selfies


Color

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample color 1 Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample color 1 Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample color 1

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample color 1

In my experience, the Apple iPhone has always had an issue properly processing colors. Apple’s algorithms often generate a t00-warm cast to photos that isn’t necessarily accurate to the scene at hand. The iPhone 11 Pro Max still does this to some degree, but the effect isn’t nearly as pronounced as it used to be. That’s good news for the iPhone.

In these samples, the iPhone’s exposures are a touch darker than the Samsung’s. This allowed them to retain more detail and deliver richer hues. It’s very close, but I think the iPhone has the better balance of exposure and detail here. It’s particularly pronounced in the grain of the wood. Samsung is often known for over-saturating colors, but in these samples the colors come off as a little flat. I’m calling the iPhone the winner here, but only by a hair.

Winner: iPhone 11 Pro Max


HDR

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample HDR Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample HDR Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample HDR

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample HDR

HDR is meant to help balance out the light and dark parts of any given scene. In the sample here, I shot the underside of a bridge with the sun overhead. It’s challenging, given the reflectivity of the river on both sides. The Galaxy S20 Ultra nailed it the first time. It’s not perfect — some detail is missing in the underbelly of the bridge — but it’s very good. More importantly, the sky is blue, and the surrounding vegetation is properly exposed. It took the iPhone three tries to get this shot right (it blow out the sky on the first two attempts), and even then it still loses too much of the bridge to the shadows.

Samsung’s flagship delivers the better HDR shot.

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


Low light

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample low light 1 Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample low light 1 Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample low light 1

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample low light 1

This is a tough one. In the sample above, the S20 got everything just right. It captured the tone and color of the sky without under- or over-doing it. The iPhone simply didn’t get it right. Focus is really soft, which makes the clouds look more like a painting than a photo.

In the shots below, however, I think the reverse is true. The S20 blows out some details that the iPhone is able to keep. Moreover, the color is a bit richer in the iPhone shot and the focus is a touch sharper. This one is too close to call.

Winner: Tie


Night mode

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample night mode 1 Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera sample night mode river Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample night mode 1

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera sample night mode river

Both the S20 Ultra and iPhone 11 have night modes that are meant to really deliver in darker environments. In this shot, there was almost no light at all, and yet both phones managed to find enough to flesh out the scene. I think the color looks a bit more natural in the S20 Ultra shot, while it skews too warm in the iPhone shot. The S20 image is also sharper and less noisy. I’m giving this one to the S20.

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


Wide/zoom

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample wide angle Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample ultra wide Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample wide angle

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample ultra wide

Let’s talk about zoom for just a second. The S20 Ultra’s main selling point is absurd levels of zoom. The device has an ultra wide-angle camera that delivers 0.5x zoom, in addition to offering 1x, 2x, 4x, 5x, 10x, 30x, and, yes, even 100x zoom. Samsung’s S20 Ultra does this by blending its up-to-4x optical zoom telephoto lens with digital cropping of the 48MP sensor to reach the 100x claim. You can see in the samples below just how effective this really is.

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample 1x Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample 1x Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample 1x

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample 1x

Apple adopted this triple-threat approach to imaging as well. The iPhone 11 Pro Max has its own ultra-wide and telephoto cameras, though it is more limited. The iPhone’s zoom is capable of 2x optical and up to 10x hybrid optical and digital crop.

The S20 Ultra’s ultra-wide shots look very good, with solid color tone and good focus. By way of comparison, the iPhone’s shots look a bit washed out and flat. Similarly, the S20 delivers quite good 10x zoomed shots, while the iPhone’s max range of 10x zoom comes across as soft and more like a painting than a photograph. Toss in the S20 Ultra’s 30x and 100x zoom range (limited though it may be), and it’s clear which device wins this round.

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample 2x Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample 2x Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample 2x

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample 2x

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Which wins?

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera modile profile times square

Based on the sample shots I was able to capture for this article, I’m going to call the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra the winner, but just by a nose. Some will surely prefer the warmer look to shots captured by the iPhone, and Apple’s device clearly takes excellent pictures in varying scenes and scenarios. I think the S20 Ultra edges out the iPhone 11 Pro Max due to its more flexible zoom range, better night mode, HDR, and daylight shooting. Yes, the iPhone does better with color and portraits, but not by much.

This concludes our Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max camera comparison. What do you think? Did we get it right? Please feel free to share your opinions in the comments below, and be sure to check out our S20 Ultra vs Pixel 4 XL camera shootout as well.

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


$ 1249 .99
Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max

Buy it Now

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max Buy it Now
$ 1249 .99

$ 1399 .99
Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Buy it Now

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Buy it Now
$ 1399 .99

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Get a free Samsung Galaxy S20 (no trade-in required!)


Sprint Samsung Galaxy S20 Flex Lease

In the wake of COVID-19, smartphone sales are plummeting. The only upside to this is that carriers are offering better deals than ever. The Samsung Galaxy S20 starts at $ 1,000 and goes up to $ 1,400 for the Galaxy 20 Ultra. However, there is now a way you can get one for absolutely free!

Sprint has the phones available on the Flex Lease program. If you order a Galaxy S20 on Flex Lease, your monthly payments will be $ 0. At the start of the month, this deal required an eligible trade-in device, but not anymore.

The Galaxy S20 Plus and S20 Ultra are also massively cheaper. The Galaxy S20 Plus is only $ 8.33 per month on Flex Lease, and the S20 Ultra is just $ 16.67 per month.

There are other perks too, including the Galaxy Forever program that lets you upgrade to the latest Galaxy device after just 12 monthly payments, rather than the standard 18 months you sign up for on a Flex Lease.

You pay the full Flex Lease price initially, but get it all back in bill credit. We’d always urge you to check out the terms and conditions for yourself, but this offer is the real deal.

Hit one of the widgets below to check out your S20 device of choice.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Flex Lease

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Samsung Galaxy S20 Plus Flex Lease

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Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Flex Lease

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The Galaxy Note 9 is at its cheapest price on Amazon right now


Samsung Galaxy Note 9 Amazon Deal

The Samsung Galaxy Note 9 is still a great phone to buy even if it’s a little older at this point. It features Qualcomm’s 2018 flagship Snapdragon 845 chipset, making it a pretty powerful phone even in 2020.

You also get Samsung’s gorgeous 6.4-inch Infinity Super AMOLED display, a dual 12MP camera with variable aperture, a large 4,000mAh battery, and of course the S-Pen. Amazon is offering up the smartphone at its cheapest price to date.

You can grab a factory unlocked Samsung Galaxy Note 9 with 128GB storage for just $ 599.99. This represents a cool 40% discount on the retail price of the phone. You can make even bigger savings on the 512GB model, which is also 40% off at $ 749.99 ($ 500 off). The deal applies to all three colors of the device.

This deal is today only, so there are literally hours to run on the clock. Click the widget below to get the Galaxy Note 9 for $ 599.99.

Samsung Galaxy Note 9 128GB storage, 6GB RAM

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Samsung Galaxy S20 accessories: Check out our 8 favorites


Galaxy S20 punchhole in hand

The Samsung Galaxy S20 smartphones have just been revealed. The latest flagship handsets from Samsung include powerful processors, lots of memory, huge camera improvements and much more. If you’re planning on picking up the S20 or one of its variants, you might want to also consider picking up some accessories to go with your new phone.  Some might want to pick up some wireless headphones or earbuds, and others might want to grab a wireless charging pad.

There are plenty of Samsung Galaxy S20 accessories to choose from, and we have our picks for the best ones you can buy.

Best Galaxy S20 accessories

1. Samsung Galaxy Buds Plus

Samsung Galaxy Buds 1 of 2

During the Samsung Unpacked event, the company also announced its newest wireless earbuds, the Galaxy Buds Plus. They are the successor to the older Galaxy Buds and have a similar design. The new earbuds will have features like Qi wireless charging and most importantly, 11-hour battery life. That’s nearly double the six-hour battery life for the older models. You can access Spotify directly from these new earbuds. You also have the choice of getting the Galaxy Buds Plus in red, blue, white, or black colors. Hopefully, the sound quality and other features will make buyers forget about the lack of a headphone jack in the S20 phones.

Read more: Best wireless earbuds

Samsung Galaxy Buds Plus Compact true wireless earbuds with neat tricks up its sleeves
The new Samsung Galaxy Buds Plus boast the same design as the originals, now with improved battery life, Spotify integration, and quicker fast charging.


2. Samsung Wireless Charger Duo PadWireless Duo Pad Fast Charge 2 press render

If you get one of the new Galaxy S20 smartphones and the new Galaxy Buds Plus, you will want a central place to charge them both. The Samsung Wireless Charger Duo Pad is the perfect Galaxy S20 accessory for that combo. The pad lets the Galaxy S20 charge up to 12W wirelessly, and there’s a dedicated area to charge your new Samsung Galaxy Buds Plus. The LED indicator lights let you know when devices are charging and when they reach 100%.

Read more: Best Samsung Galaxy chargers

3. Samsung 45W charger for Galaxy S20 Ultra

pd samsung charger s20

If you buy the most expensive member of the Galaxy S20 family, the S20 Ultra, you will be happy to know it supports fast 45W wired charging. The bad news? The phone only comes with a 25W wired charger in the box. In order to get the full 45W experience, you will have to buy the supported charger separately. It’s available now on Amazon for $ 39 in white, and $ 50 in black.

4. Samsung Galaxy Fit

samsung galaxy fit on wrist sleep tracking

If you want an affordable fitness wearable to go with your Galaxy S20, the Samsung Galaxy Fit is the perfect choice. It has a small rectangular AMOLED display. It also has a heart rate monitor, gyroscope, and accelerometer onboard. The Galaxy Fit series runs on Realtime OS. Samsung says this will provide an easy-to-use software experience, with support for smartphone notifications, alarms, calendar alerts, and weather.

Read more: Best fitness trackers


5. Samsung Galaxy Watch Active 2

samsung galaxy watch active 2 review watch face clock face 4

If you want a true smartwatch with fitness features for your new Galaxy S20, the Galaxy Watch Active 2 is the one to get. The latest watch sports an optical heart rate sensor, a built-in GPS, an NFC chip for Samsung Pay, a 5ATM water resistance rating, as well as a MIL-STD-810G rating and IP68 certification. It also supports Bluetooth 4.2m NFC, Wi-Fi, and there is an LTE option. Unfortunately, the Galaxy Watch Active 2 doesn’t come with a rotating dial like other Samsung watches.

Read more: Best smartwatches


6. Samsung Galaxy S20 cases and screen protectors

ringke fusion x galaxy s20 case

 

There are already a bunch of third-party cases on sale for the Galaxy S20, the Galaxy S20 Plus, and the Galaxy S20 Ultra. They have a wide range of different styles and protection. You can get an ultra-thin case such as the ones made by MNML, leather wallet cases like the ones from FYY, or the heavy-duty dual-layer protection models like the ones made by Ringke.

There’s also a bunch of screen protectors available, again for the Galaxy S20, S20 Plus and S20 Ultra phones. They should keep your touchscreen safe from scratches or falls. More cases and screen protectors for those phones will be added in the coming weeks and months, and we will update our lists accordingly.


7. SanDisk microSD cards

sandisk 512mb microsd card

The Galaxy S20 series may have lost the headphone jack, but the new phones still support adding more storage via its microSD card slot, up to 1TB of extra space  The ones made by SanDisk are among our favorites. They are one of the first companies to introduce microSD cards with the A1 rating, and these Class 10 UHS 1 microSD cards are some of the best options if you are looking for fast app performance. The 16GB and 32GB versions of the cards offer maximum transfer speeds up to 98MBps, while the higher storage versions, going all the way up to 512GB, bump that up to 100MBps.

Read more: Best microSD cards


8. Anker PowerCore Slim 10,000mAh battery pack

anker powercore slim 10000 battery pack

If you want an external battery pack for your S20, there are tons of them to choose from. Anker makes some of the best battery packs, including their PowerCore Slim 10,000mAh model. It’s designed to be thin and light, so you should be able to take it anywhere. However, it also has a large 10,000mAh battery, which means you can charge your Galaxy S20 phone at least twice with its USB-C port.

Read more: Best portable battery chargers

Samsung Galaxy S20 The latest and greatest from Samsung
The Samsung Galaxy S20, Galaxy S20 Plus, and Galaxy S20 Ultra are super-premium 5G smartphones from the South Korean company. No matter what you’re looking for, the Galaxy S20 line likely has something to suit your needs.


Which of these Samsung Galaxy S20 accessories do you plan to pick up alongside these new smartphones? Let us know in the comments and check out our related Galaxy S20 coverage below.

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Samsung Galaxy Z Flip gets its first official teaser ad during the Oscars


The existence of the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip has been leaked via video and renders well before Tuesday’s big Samsung Unpacked press event. However, the company has now decided to run an official teaser TV ad for the upcoming foldable phone two days before that event. The commercial was first shown during ABC’s telecast of the Oscars.

While the ad doesn’t actually show the name of this phone, it’s clear the device is the clamshell-based Galaxy Z Flip. As reposted on the It’s me CL YouTube channel, the commercial shows the smartphone opening up to its full-screen length. It then shows how the camera app can be used to place the subject on the top screen, while the bottom screen can be placed flat on a surface to take a photo.

The ad also shows the small secondary screen when the Galaxy Z Flip is closed that can be used for phone notifications. One interesting thing about the commercial is that there’s a small disclaimer on the bottom that says people may “notice a crease at the center of the main screen”, which Samsung says is a “natural characteristic of the screen”. It’s obvious that Samsung is trying to head off complaints about visible creases on the Galaxy Z Flip.

The ad concludes with the February 11 date for the Samsung Unpacked event, where we will presumably get a full and official reveal of Samsung’s new foldable. You can check out what has been unofficially leaked about this foldable phone at our Galaxy Z Flip page. Stay tuned as we will have full coverage of the Samsung Unpacked press event on Tuesday.

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Motorola Razr breaks down before Galaxy Fold in folding test (Updated Feb. 7)


[Update, February 7: Motorola provided a statement in response to CNET‘s article: 

“razr is a unique smartphone, featuring a dynamic clamshell folding system unlike any device on the market. SquareTrade’s FoldBot is simply not designed to test our device. Therefore, any tests run utilizing this machine will put undue stress on the hinge and not allow the phone to open and close as intended, making the test inaccurate. The important thing to remember is that razr underwent extensive cycle endurance testing during product development, and CNET’s test is not indicative of what consumers will experience when using razr in the real-world. We have every confidence in the durability of razr.”]


[Original article:] The Motorola Razr is a modern take on the clamshell phone, offering a foldable display and other extras. How durable is it though? Well, CNET conducted a folding test, and the results might be disappointing.

The outlet used the Square Trade FoldBot testing machine to repeatedly fold and unfold the Motorola Razr. This is the same testing machine and method used for the Samsung Galaxy Fold, which managed to last for roughly 120,000 folds before breaking down.

Unfortunately, the Motorola Razr folding test ended after just 27,218 folds (skip to the 4:08:50 mark in the video above), with the phone not actually folding properly during the last few seconds of the test. After taking the phone out of the machine, the team was able to ascertain that it couldn’t fold shut.

Fortunately, the phone’s screen was still (seemingly) fully functional. And if this is the case for other Razr units as well, it doesn’t necessarily mean the end of the world if your hinge is broken. So you can likely still backup any important content directly from the phone.

This figure means that if you fold and unfold your device 100 times a day, the Razr wouldn’t last a year. And it would be equivalent to roughly 18 months if you fold and unfold your device 50 times a day.

It’s still worth noting that the robot isn’t as gentle with the Razr as a human might be, and the folding test doesn’t mimic the frequency with which a human might open and close the device. Nevertheless, we hope manufacturers are making the next generation of foldable devices even more durable.

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A new Galaxy S20 report just put a damper on those 10x optical zoom rumors


Samsung Galaxy S11 Plus Renders OnLeaks 3Cash Karo

Just a couple of days ago, we got wind of the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra with its mad zoom capabilities. It was rumored that the phone will feature 10x optical zoom. However, a new report now has us second guessing the previous leak.

According to The Elec (via Sammobile), Samsung is sourcing prisms for 5x optical zoom camera modules. Optrontech — a South Korean manufacturer of optical parts — has apparently confirmed that it has supplied the said prisms to Samsung for the Galaxy S20 series.

Contradictory to previous rumors, The Elec does not mention 10x optical zoom at all. One reason for this could be that Samsung has reserved 10x optical zoom only for the S20 Ultra. There’s also a chance that the 5x optical zoom module is meant for the regular Galaxy S20 and S20 Plus.

Then again, It’s entirely possible that Samsung will cap optical zoom to 5x in all three phones. If so, Huawei’s rumored P40 series could be the first to feature 10x optical zoom. However, we highly doubt Samsung will miss an opportunity to best Huawei in the camera department.

What the rumors say so far

Based on what we know so far, the Galaxy S20, S20 Plus and S20 Ultra will have varying camera configurations. Samsung’s ultra high-res 108MP camera is also said to be confined to the S20 Ultra. So it’s possible Samsung is sourcing prisms for the 10x optical zoom module from somewhere else and we just don’t know about it yet.

All we can do for now is speculate on the rumors that are out there. Even if the Galaxy S20 phones get 5x optical zoom, it’s still a significant jump over the current 2x zoom module used in the Galaxy S10 and Note 10 phones.

We’ll update you as and when we know more about the new Samsung flagships.

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Galaxy Z Flip might get a bigger battery than Moto Razr, but will it be enough?


new samsung galaxy foldable smartphone flip phone samsung developer conference 2019 2

After much confusion, it looks like Galaxy Z Flip is the name for Samsung’s upcoming clamshell phone. The name was previously tipped by leakster Ice Universe and has now been reaffirmed by XDA Developers’ Max Weinbach. Incidentally, Weinbach is also the one behind the latest series of Galaxy S20 leaks.

In a series of tweets, Weinbach reveals some more information about the alleged Galaxy Z Fold. The tipster says that the foldable phone will get a 3,300mAh battery and will run on the Snapdragon 855 chipset. The 2019 flagship chipset was also tipped in a previous report, back when we thought the phone was called the Galaxy Fold 2.

At 3,300mAh, the new Galaxy foldable trumps the battery capacity of the recently launched Moto Razr clamshell. The Razr comes with a measly 2,510mAh battery, which Moto claims works well with the phone’s Snapdragon 710 SoC.

However, the Galaxy Z Flip’s more premium processor could drain its 3,300mAh battery pretty quickly. It’s even smaller than the 3,500mAh battery on 2018’s Galaxy S9 Plus, which was not very impressive to begin with. In our testing, the S9 Plus’ battery gave us merely three hours of screen-on time during our camera testing and six hours with heavy usage.

It’s possible Samsung had to compromise on the battery capacity of the Galaxy Z Flip in order to maintain a thin form factor.

To mitigate battery drain, Samsung could look at deploying the Galaxy Fold‘s Adaptive Power Saving Mode on the new phone. The feature regulates battery consumption depending on how you use your device.

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip display rumors

Apart from outing the Galaxy Z Flip’s battery details, Weinbach has also revealed some info about its display. He says that the phone will feature an ultra-thin glass layered with plastic to avoid scratching.

This isn’t the first time we’ve heard rumors of Samsung’s next foldable using ultra-thin glass. Two previous reports have stated the same. However, that extra layer of plastic on top of the ultra-thin glass is new information to us.

Ultra-thin glass protection is good news since it’s more scratch resistant than plastic. It also reportedly results in less wrinkles compared to the first wave of foldable phone displays.

Weinbach claims the plastic layer on top will serve as additional protection for the display. If it gets scratched, only the plastic will suffer the damage, not the display.


What do you think of the Galaxy Z Flip so far? Are you excited for Samsung’s clamshell phone? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

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OnePlus 8 series to challenge the Galaxy S20 with its own 120Hz Fluid Display


OnePlus display

OnePlus has developed a new QHD+ OLED display with a 120Hz refresh rate that will debut with the OnePlus 8 series. The company revealed specifications and features for the new display at its screen technology event held in Shenzhen, China earlier today.

With a 120Hz refresh rate, the content on the display is refreshed 120 times per second. This makes for smoother playback as well as an overall fluid OS navigation experience. We’ve previously seen 120Hz screens on the likes of the Asus ROG Phone 2 and Razer Phone 2.

OnePlus 120Hz Fluid Display specs

According to information trickling in on Twitter and Chinese social media website Weibo, the display will feature a 10-bit color depth. This means that it will be able to produce a palette of 1.07 billion colors as opposed to an 8-bit panel which can display 16.7 million colors. Having a 10-bit panel is also necessary for true HDR 10 implementation.

The Verge reports that OnePlus worked with Samsung to develop the new display. The publication also reports that the company has done work on top of Android to improve animations like core OS gestures.

Additionally, OnePlus aims to have a 0.8 JNCD rating for every 120Hz display it produces. JNCD stands for Just Noticeable Color Differences and is a measurement of the bare minimum color difference a human eye can spot. By comparison, the Galaxy Note 10 Plus has a 0.4 JNCD, which means it displays colors that are near perfect.

Machine translation of the company’s presentation slides suggests that the new display will use a dedicated MEMC chip. MEMC stands for Motion Estimation and Motion Compensation and is usually a technology available on televisions. It inserts new frames between existing ones in a video to decrease motion blur.

OnePlus’ MEMC tech can apparently upscale low frame rate videos to a maximum of 120 frames per second, making the picture smoother and more natural. If this really works as intended, it could mean a much better gaming experience on future OnePlus phones.

Further, OnePlus’ 120Hz display has a touch sample rate of 240Hz and can apparently hit 1,000 nits peak brightness. It is optimized by something OnePlus calls Smooth Chain technology. However, details are scarce at the moment thanks to the official information being available only in Chinese.

Will the OnePlus 8 get a 120Hz display?

Speaking to The Verge, OnePlus CEO Pete Lau confirmed that the company’s next phone would tout the new display tech, even going as far as to say that it will be “the best smartphone display in 2020.”

That’s quite the claim! We just hope the high refresh rate displays are well optimized for power consumption. Current OnePlus devices with a 90Hz display experience significant battery drainage when the refresh rate is set to 90Hz.

OnePlus is expected to detail its display tech even further very soon. We’ll let you know as soon as we have the latest.

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