Tag Archive | "camera"

New phone camera sensor promises dramatically improved low light photos


Vivo X50 Pro camera module

  • Vivo is working on an RGBW camera sensor that could lead to huge improvements in low-light photography.
  • It’s reportedly twice as efficient as a conventional sensor.
  • Phones using the sensor are already in the works, and expected to arrive in 2021.

It’s still challenging to take a good low light photo with your phone, but Vivo might just fix that in the near future. The Chinese brand has unveiled plans for an RGBW (red, green, blue, white) camera sensor that excels in dim lighting conditions.

The design is billed as the first sensor with both an RGBW matrix and a color filter array, and reportedly boasts a 160% higher photosensitive efficiency than a conventional RGGB (red, green, green, blue) unit — you’ll take “precise and clear” photos in low light, Vivo claimed. It’s even 60% more efficient than the RYYB (red, yellow, yellow, blue) sensors in phones like the Huawei P40 Pro, according to Vivo, and isn’t prone to their color casting issues.

Devices using the new sensor are in the works, and are expected to reach stores in 2021. Vivo said it had been “discreetly” working on the sensor for about a year.

Read more: Tips to take your photography to the next level

This isn’t the first time phone makers have used RGBW sensors. Huawei used one in the P8 from 2015 to reduce low light noise and improve brightness in high contrast situations. We generally liked its output, although it had problems with brightly-lit backgrounds as well as color saturation in dark scenes. That was five years ago, however, and we’d expect Vivo to benefit from technical progress since then.

There are no guarantees this will lead to the stellar output the company has promised. However, Vivo has developed a knack for low light photography in devices like the X50 Pro, even without relying on a night mode. The main concern is simply that the competition isn’t standing still. Samsung is rumored to be creating a new version of its 108MP sensor, and we’d expect sensor experts like Sony to deliver updates in 2021 as well. Still, this suggests Vivo won’t be left behind.


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

We asked, you told us: The iPhone SE camera slaps the OnePlus Nord


iPhone SE 2020 White Rear Camera Apple Logo

The OnePlus Nord was always likely to face some stark comparisons to rival devices when it launched earlier this month. Packing six cameras in total, the phone embraces the more is better philosophy, but does this translate into stellar performance?

Well, we can only really decide by comparing it to its contemporaries. While the rumored Pixel 4a isn’t yet here, the iPhone SE most assuredly is.

In a recent OnePlus Nord vs iPhone SE camera shootout, we asked you to weigh in with your thoughts and pick the overall winner. Here’s what you decided.

Which phone takes better photos: the OnePlus Nord or the iPhone SE?

oneplus nord or the iphone se shootout poll results

Results

We declared the iPhone SE as the marginal winner in our shootout but your votes and comments suggest a much larger gulf in quality between the two phones.

Of the over 4,000 votes cast, 65.4% believe that the iPhone SE shoots better photos. It’s not just a victory for the Apple device but rather the one-camera-to-rule-them-all philosophy as a whole.

The iPhone SE packs four fewer cameras than the Nord. A single 12MP sensor at the rear joins a 7MP camera up front. As the iPhone SE lacks an ultra-wide camera and macro sensor, we were unable to include comparisons there, so we imagine the Nord wins by default in that regard?

Related: OnePlus Nord vs iPhone SE: Which should you buy?

On that note, the Nord did receive just under 1,500 votes in our survey, or just under 35% of the thumbs up. That’s a fair response for a phone that arguably has a more versatile camera array. Despite this, there’s little doubt though that the OnePlus Nord’s 48MP snapper falls short of the iPhone SE. Shots snapped by the former lacked dynamic range, sharpness, and the color detail of its competitor’s prints. The Nord’s much larger 32MP selfie sensor doesn’t necessarily guarantee better shots either, something we’ve also noticed ourselves.

Quality versus quantity is the primary takeaway from this battle.

Here’s what you had to say

  • Neil T: For me there wasn’t a shocking amount of difference in terms of quality. It’s there, but not a night and day difference. The biggest difference for me was the Nord’s pics look cooler while the iPhone’s pics looked warmer.
  • Stephen C: iPhone is the winner here.
  • Hrvoyay: Nord is very soft, even blurry at times. Not great at all.
  • Ellio74: We were told OP was going to provide a flagship camera experience, it didn’t just say from which year…
  • Thomas: This comparison shows that megapixel count and number of cameras are so overrated. Oneplus should’ve invested more into having a good main camera instead of adding a useless depth and macro camera.
  • D9: iPhone for the win here, with the Nord being fairly mediocre. Oneplus should have ditched the additional useless camera sensors they included only to be able to say we have X number of cameras and instead had two quality cameras on the backside with good processing.
  • VJ: iPhone SE. And this just shows you don’t need to have tons of cameras on your phones. Put only 2 but very good ones and same money as well.
  • alfonzso: iPhone generally provides the most consistent photos. However, to me it seems like Nord’s colors are more realistic (guessing, since I didn’t see the scenes with my own eyes) in most of the shots.

That’s it for the results of our OnePlus Nord vs iPhone SE camera poll. Thanks for the votes and comments. If you have comments on the results of our shootout, be sure to drop them down below.


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Did you know: The LG V40 opened the era of modern triple camera phones


LG V40 ThinQ triple camera bump

LG phones might not be at the height of their popularity in 2020, as Samsung, Xiaomi, and others surpass it in terms of critical and commercial success. It’s easy to forget though that the company isn’t afraid to try new things.

Whether it was quad Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC) audio hardware, an ultra-wide camera, or manual video functionality, the South Korean manufacturer has brought quite a few things to the table. In fact, it might surprise you to know that the company was the first to offer a modern triple camera phone in the LG V40 ThinQ.

Cameras increase in number

Smartphones were stuck on single rear cameras for the longest time, with the exception of dual camera phones from HTC and LG in 2011. The HTC Evo 3D and LG Optimus 3D both used the secondary camera for 3D effects though. We also saw another early dual camera effort with the HTC One M7 in 2013, which delivered depth effects and 3D-style photos too.

However, it was 2016 that saw dual-camera solutions truly embraced by the industry at large, as we saw a variety of useful secondary cameras emerge. Huawei touted a monochrome secondary camera, while LG went ultra-wide, and Apple went for a telephoto zoom camera. The latter two setups gave you entirely different perspectives too, making for a more versatile camera experience than ever before.

It used to be the case that you had to choose between ultra-wide and telephoto cameras rather than having both.

This led to an interesting dilemma though, as it meant you had to choose which perspective you valued more. Do you go for the ultra-wide secondary camera for group photos and cityscapes? Or do you opt for a telephoto camera that lets you get closer without having to physically get closer?

This dilemma persisted for a long time, as dual camera adoption increased in 2017 and 2018. But it was in October 2018 that LG finally gave consumers the best of both worlds.

Enter the LG V40

LG V40 ThinQ rear panel

The LG V40 launched in early October of 2018, and it changed the game by offering a triple rear camera setup.

Now, this wasn’t the first phone to offer a triple rear camera arrangement, with the Huawei P20 Pro launching earlier that year. However, it was the first phone to offer the now standard main/zoom/ultra-wide camera trio. Meanwhile, the P20 Pro opted for a main/zoom/monochrome combination that hasn’t been used by others in the industry.

LG’s late 2018 flagship wielded a 12MP main, 16MP ultra-wide, and 12MP 2x telephoto sensor. This meant that you had a camera for every occasion. On safari and want to get a decent shot of that animal in the distance? Then the telephoto can help. Going sightseeing and want to get that entire landscape or building in one photo? That’s where the ultra-wide comes in. In other words, you didn’t have to buy the LG G7 if you wanted an ultra-wide shooter or an iPhone or Xiaomi Mi 8 if you wanted good zoom — the V40 had it all.

Related: Want a phone with a great camera? Here’s what to look for.

The biggest downside to the LG V40 though was the fact that image quality wasn’t good in anything other than broad daylight. This hasn’t changed much with subsequent firmware updates, as our own Ryan-Thomas Shaw noted in his LG V40 retrospective. However, Ryan did appreciate the background blur from the main camera (no bokeh mode required), as well as the dynamic range and color reproduction for the most part.

LG also stood out from others by offering two selfie cameras, featuring a 5MP ultra-wide shooter and an 8MP primary lens. In other words, you had a total of five cameras on board.

Life after triple cameras

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra back at angle

The LG V40 was the first triple camera phone with a truly flexible setup back then, but it’s clear that rivals thought it was a path worth following too. After all, the similarly equipped Huawei Mate 20 Pro and quad camera-toting Samsung Galaxy A9 both launched mere days after LG’s phone.

And the trend would only continue in 2019, as Apple, Huawei, Samsung, Xiaomi, and others all released phones with the normal/wide/telephoto camera setup. In fact, some brands have even gone so far as to implement quad- or penta-camera setups.

Some of these extra cameras include macro cameras for shooting extreme close-ups of things, depth sensors and 3D Time-of-Flight sensors for depth of field effects, and additional zoom cameras for long-range zoom capabilities. Nevertheless, the normal/wide/telephoto trio is what you should expect on most high-end phones today. Anything more would be a bonus.

The LG V40 marked an important stage in the evolution of smartphone photography, joining other recent additions like periscope cameras and night modes.


This is the fourth post in our “Did you know” series, in which we dive into the Android history books to uncover important and interesting facts or events that have been forgotten over time. What do you want to see us cover next? Let us know in the comments.


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Camera shootout: Sony Xperia 1 II vs Huawei P40 Pro


Alpha, Leica, and Zeiss are big names from the professional photography market that have each lent their reputation to a small selection of high-profile smartphones. Some of the most recent include the Alpha- and Zeiss-branded Sony Xperia 1 II and the Leica-branded Huawei P40 Pro. With these key partnerships in place, expectations are high for these smartphone cameras.

We’ve already taken the Sony Xperia 1 II out for a spin against the Samsung Galaxy S20 Plus. But can Sony’s flagship hold its own against arguably the best smartphone camera around, the Huawei P40 Pro?

Catch up: Galaxy S20 Plus vs Xperia 1 II camera shootout

Sony Xperia 1 II vs Huawei P40 Pro camera: Specs

The Huawei P40 Pro and Sony Xperia 1 II serve up the classic main, wide-angle, and zoom camera combination, paired up with a dedicated depth sensor for improved bokeh blur. However, there are some key differences between these two packages that have a noticeable impact on image quality.

Most obviously is the Huawei P40 Pro’s large 50 megapixel (binned to 12.5MP) 1/1.28-inch main sensor, wide f/1.9 aperture, and RYYB (rather than RGGB) pixel configuration for vastly improved light capture versus the Xperia 1 II’s setup. At 1/1.7-inches the Xperia’s main sensor isn’t small, but it’s not large by modern standards. On paper, Huawei appears to have a big lead in the main sensor department.

  Huawei P40 Pro Sony Xperia 1 II
Main camera 50 megapixels (12.5MP binned)
f/1.9 aperture
1/1.28-inch sensor
Omnidirectional PDAF, OIS, RYYB
12 megapixels
f/1.7 aperture
1/1.7-inch sensor
Dual Pixel PDAF, OIS
Secondary camera Wide-angle
40 megapixels (10MP binned)
f/1.8 aperture
1/1.54-inch sensor
PDAF
124˚ wide-angle
12 megapixels
f/2.2 aperture
1/2.55-inch sensor
Dual Pixel PDAF
Third camera 5x telephoto zoom
12 megapixels
f/3.4 aperture
PDAF, OIS, RYYB
3x optical zoom
12 megapixels
f/2.4 aperture
1/3.4-inch sensor
PDAF, OIS
Fourth camera Depth (time-of-flight) Depth (time-of-flight)
0.3 megapixels

It’s a similar situation with the wide and zoom camera, with Huawei touting the more accomplished spec sheet. It has a larger wide-angle sensor and telephoto zoom lens setup, allowing its range to extend up to 5x. The Xperia 1 II offers a 3x optical lens for a good level of zoom, and should capture a fair amount of light, too. But overall, Sony’s flagship clearly has its work cut out for it to surpass one of the industry’s photography giants.

Read more: Why camera sensor size is more important than megapixels

Sony Xperia 1 II vs Huawei P40 Pro camera: Samples

Both phones are capable of taking great pictures, but the issues I noted with the Xperia 1 II vs Galaxy S20 Plus are also noticeable in comparison to the Huawei P40 Pro. Sony’s flagship regularly struggles with a lack of decent HDR, leading to overexposed highlights and lack of detail in shadows. As a result, colors can also look a little washed out or underdeveloped with the Xperia. The P40 Pro has no such problem, giving it a quick lead as the more consistent shooter.

Click here for full-quality image samples

Sony Xperia 1 II Huawei P40 Pro Sony Xperia 1 II

Huawei P40 Pro

Sony Xperia 1 II Huawei P40 Pro Sony Xperia 1 II

Huawei P40 Pro

There’s also a noticeable difference in the level of detail captured by the two cameras. Sony’s 12MP main camera captures plenty of detail with minimal noise, although images are a tad overly sharp compared to Huawei’s. But the Huawei P40 Pro’s 12.5MP pixel-binned snaps take mobile photography up another level. Huawei’s main sensor results are absent of sharpening and obvious signs of image cleanup, thanks to its BM3D noise reduction technology and large image sensor. Fine details are preserved, and its results are some of the softest, most natural looking of any smartphone camera, although you have to pixel-peep to see it.

Sony Xperia 1 II - 100% crop Huawei P40 Pro – 100% crop Sony Xperia 1 II – 100% crop

Huawei P40 Pro - 100% crop

Sony Xperia 1 II - 100% crop Huawei P40 Pro – 100% crop Sony Xperia 1 II – 100% crop

Huawei P40 Pro - 100% crop

The Xperia 1 II’s issues with exposure and HDR can be frustrating.

The two phones are more similar when it comes to color. The two target a realistic color space with minimal oversaturation and good white balance, although both phones occasionally produce an overly warm tint, so they aren’t perfect. The Huawei P40 Pro’s colors tend to look a tad more saturated, particularly in the green and reds. But this is likely down to its superior dynamic range rather than overly heavy color processing.

Sony Xperia 1 II Huawei P40 Pro Sony Xperia 1 II

Huawei P40 Pro

Sony Xperia 1 II Huawei P40 Pro Sony Xperia 1 II

Huawei P40 Pro

Overall, both cameras are capable of great-looking pictures. However, the Huawei P40 Pro is the more consistent in terms of quality and holds up the best when pixel peeping.

Read more: All the new Huawei P40 camera technology explained

Low light

The Sony Xperia 1 II finally includes a long-exposure night mode for capturing images in low light, so we can take the camera for a spin in the dark. However, the Huawei P40 Pro is capable of taking good looking night shots without the need for the long-exposure Night mode. This is the best way to shoot in low light with the P40, as otherwise images often come out blurry.

Low-light photography continues to be the toughest task for smartphone cameras and both phones have their strengths and weaknesses. Generally speaking, the P40 Pro’s images come out brighter and sharper, but it’s not immune to lack of detail and washed out colors. Sadly, the Huawei P40 Pro’s low-light shots appear heavily processed, which can ruin the appearance of some pictures when cropping in.

Sony Xperia 1 II Huawei P40 Pro Sony Xperia 1 II

Huawei P40 Pro

Sony Xperia 1 II - 100% crop Huawei P40 Pro – 100% crop Sony Xperia 1 II – 100% crop

Huawei P40 Pro - 100% crop

Sony’s low light results are passable, overall, and particularly good when it comes to color retention and yellow light correction. The Xperia 1 II is also much lighter on the post-processing, resulting in some grain and extra noise. But this can provide superior detail retention in some situations versus the Huawei P40 Pro. Despite these strengths, the Xperia relies a little too heavily on very long exposures and too many of my low-light pictures came out blurry.

Up next: How are smartphone cameras becoming so good in low light?

Zoom, wide-angles, and bokeh

Thanks to its 5x periscope lens, the Huawei P40 Pro is capable of taking longer range pictures than the 3x optical camera on the Xperia 1 II. Huawei’s maximum zoom image quality is also superior with regards to color, detail, and exposure. However, cropping in to 100% and comparing both phones at 3x makes for a more interesting comparison, as this pits Huawei’s hybrid solution against Sony’s optical sensor.

Huawei’s hybrid technology shows telltale signs of heavy-handed processing and image cleanup, as is typical of hybrid approaches. However, the company’s software extracts roughly equivalent and sometimes finer detail at 3x than the Xperia 1 II’s optical lens. Sony’s zoom images look quite clean but lack the dynamic range and sharpness of the P40 Pro’s images when you crop in. However, Sony’s optical lens seems to perform better than Huawei’s hybrid approach in less ideal lighting conditions. Ultimately, zoom quality varies quite a bit on a shot by shot basis.

Read more: Super-resolution zoom explained

Sony Xperia 1 II - 3x zoom Huawei P40 Pro – 5x zoom Sony Xperia 1 II – 3x zoom

Huawei P40 Pro - 5x zoom

Sony Xperia 1 II - 3x 100% Huawei P40 Pro – 3x 100% Sony Xperia 1 II – 3x 100%

Huawei P40 Pro - 3x 100%

Huawei’s 3x hybrid zoom can extract comparable or superior detail to Sony’s 3x optical lens

The two phones’ wide-angle cameras are a little less impressive. Sony’s implementation suffers from the same exposure issues as it’s main and zoom sensors. There’s also notable lens distortion, chromatic aberration, and a distinct lack of focus and detail. The Huawei P40 Pro’s wide-angle lens offers far superior detail and colors. It would be an excellent shooting option if only the lens was a little wider, as it is narrower than the competition. The P40 Pro also outputs its wide images in a 16:9 ratio, which attempts to make the pictures look wider but leaves you with less image data overall.

Sony Xperia 1 II - wide Huawei P40 Pro – wide Sony Xperia 1 II – wide

Huawei P40 Pro - wide

Sony Xperia 1 II - bokeh Huawei P40 Pro – bokeh Sony Xperia 1 II – bokeh

Huawei P40 Pro - bokeh

Unfortunately, the zoom and wide-angle experience with the Xperia 1 II is compromised by Sony’s software. The camera app won’t select the 3x optical or wide-angle lens when using pinch zoom. Instead, you have to manually press the lens icon or switch the focal length in the Photo Pro app. This is a basic quality-of-life feature that you’ll find on the Huawei P40 Pro and virtually every other smartphone.

Bokeh is a much closer run competition. The two handsets offer very good edge detection and offer a realistic bokeh gradient from foreground to background, thanks to their dedicated time-of-flight hardware. The Huawei P40 Pro and Xperia 1 II offer some of the best bokeh quality you’ll find in a smartphone. The phones are inseparable with fine detail edge detection too, such as hair, where both are just as hit and miss as the other.

The best Huawei phones you can buy right now

Sony Xperia 1 II vs Huawei P40 Pro cameras

Credit: Robert Triggs / Android Authority

Sony Xperia 1 II vs Huawei P40 Pro camera: The verdict

The Huawei P40 Pro and Sony Xperia 1 II are two of the best phones I’ve shot with when it comes to color accuracy. Both can produce some truly excellent full-frame shots. However, it’s clear that Huawei earns a healthy quality lead when we examine their photographs with a fine comb.

Read on: The best Android camera phones you can buy

Huawei’s unique main sensor hardware hands in some of the cleanest images you can capture with a smartphone. Detail and noise are exceptional, and colors, exposure, and white balance are mostly very good, too. The Xperia 1 II has its strengths, particularly in the color and grain departments, but it doesn’t quite nail its zoom or wide-angle experiences as well as the P40 Pro.

Sadly, Sony’s latest flagship is let down by its inconsistency when it comes to overexposure and HDR. There’s no excuse, as much lower-cost handsets don’t suffer from these basic problems. While you can find a more traditional multi-frame HDR option in the Camera Pro app, this should be switched on by default in the standard app that most consumers will use. It’s such a shame, as you simply can’t shoot in bright, dynamically lit environments. If the Xperia 1 II offered a workable HDR implementation by default, Sony would have a much more competitive flagship camera.

$ 1199 .99
Sony Xperia 1 II

Buy it Now

Sony Xperia 1 II Buy it Now
$ 1199 .99

£875 .00
Huawei P40 Pro

Save £24 .99

Buy it Now

Huawei P40 Pro Buy it Now
Save £24 .99 £875 .00

Please wait.. Loading poll


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Samsung Galaxy Fold update brings Galaxy S20 camera features to foldable


Update, April 29 2020 (6AM ET): Samsung pushed out Android 10 to the Galaxy Fold in late March and early April, including several Galaxy S20 features as well. Unfortunately, we didn’t see the Galaxy S20’s camera features in this update.

Thankfully, Samsung has just rolled out another Galaxy Fold update (h/t: SamMobile), and this one brings a few prominent S20 series camera features. Some of the more prominent additions include Single Take mode (automatically taking videos and pictures) and Night Hyperlapse.

Other prominent additions include the ability to record videos in Pro mode, custom filters based on your existing snaps, and the May 2020 security patch.

SamMobile adds that the update has the version number F900FXXU3BTDD and is rolling out in France right now. Hopefully it doesn’t take too long to reach other markets.


Welcome to the Samsung Galaxy Fold Android update hub. Here, you’ll find everything you need to know about the latest Galaxy Fold updates, including their current versions, and when future updates are likely to arrive.

Samsung Galaxy Fold One of the first folding smartphones in the market.

Samsung Galaxy Fold update

  • Current stable version: Android 10/Android 9
  • When will the Samsung Galaxy Fold get Android 11? TBA

The Samsung Galaxy Fold launched with Android 9 Pie, the then-latest version of Android. It’s expected to receive two major updates in the future in keeping with most flagship Android phones.

Samsung Galaxy Fold update availability Android 10 Android 11
AT&T TBA TBA
US Unlocked TBA TBA
International Unlocked Yes TBA

The Samsung foldable received a major update (version F900U1UEU3BTCE) in late March and early April, bringing the Android 10-based One UI 2.1. This update also delivered Quick Share and Music Share capabilities.

Let us know which Galaxy Fold update you’re rocking in the comments, and if you’ve spotted an OTA we haven’t, tip us!

Looking for another device update? Check out our Android 9 Pie and Android 10 update trackers.

More posts about Samsung


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Camera shootout: Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs Apple iPhone 11 Max Pro


Last fall, Apple came out swinging with the iPhone 11 Pro Max. The fruit company’s latest flagship has an advanced triple-camera system meant to provide users with the ultimate mobile photography experience. Samsung rose to meet the challenge with its Galaxy S20 series, and the Galaxy S20 Ultra in particular. This new phone boasts one of the most capable multi-camera systems in the market. Is one better than the other? Find out in our Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max camera shootout.

Note: All the sample photos in our article have been resized for display purposes. Full-resolution samples are available here.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Specs

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs Apple iPhone Pro Max 3

Before we dive into the photos, let’s take a gander at the hardware. Each device has a complex system stuck on the back, with myriad cameras working together to produce results.

The Galaxy S20 Ultra’s main shooter captures 108MP at f/1.8. Of note: it has a really large 1/1.33 sensor, which lets it capture a lot of light. This is what powers its nighttime features. Shots taken with this camera are binned down by a factor of nine (nona-binning) to 12MP each, but the full resolution is available with the press of a button. The telephoto camera snaps 48MP shots at f/3.5, the ultra-wide snaps 12MP shots at f/2.2, and the selfie camera snaps 40MP shots (binned to 10MP) at f/2.2. A time-of-flight (ToF) sensor helps with depth information. That’s a lot of sensors and lenses.

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera module profile

Apple’s approach is similar though not quite the same. The iPhone 11 Pro Max has a three-camera setup on the rear. Apple opted for three 12MP sensors for the ultra-wide, standard, and telephoto cameras. The ultra-wide enjoys an aperture of f/2.4 and a 120-degree field of view, while the standard camera has an aperture of f/1.8, and the 2x optical zoom telephoto offers an aperture of f/2.0. These are joined by a 12MP selfie camera at f/2.2. Apple does not use a ToF sensor, nor does it use pixel-binning.

iPhone 11 Pro Max Camera

Samsung and Apple rely on entirely different processing platforms. The S20 Ultra, for example, relies on the Snapdragon 865 system-on-a-chip. The 865 provides a range of advanced imaging tools, including machine learning and a dedicated image signal processor. Apple, on the other hand, uses its home-grown A13 Bionic chip with a third-generation neural engine.

Pitting the performance of these two processors head to head is not exactly an (ahem) apples-to-apples comparison, so we’re not going to deliver a verdict here. We do know, however, that the Snapdragon 865 bested the A13 on some benchmarks.

See also: Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra review | Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max review


Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Apps and features

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs Apple iPhone Pro Max 2

Specs are important at determining the results, but the software is often doing most of the work. How are the camera apps from Samsung and Apple?

Both Samsung and Apple have straight-forward camera applications that make it a breeze to find and use features. A double-press of the power button launches the camera app of the S20 Ultra, but there’s no way to truly rapidly launch the iPhone camera app. The best you can do is wake the screen and tap the camera shortcut on the lock screen. I wish Apple had a speedier method.

Samsung simplified its camera UI recently in One UI 2.0. The shutter button is located prominently, with camera modes and zoom tools nearby. I like that Samsung makes certain controls (flash, timer, aspect ratio, etc.) a breeze to adjust with a few quick taps. Shooting modes include photo, video, Single Take, pro, panorama, food, night, live focus (portrait), live focus video, pro video, super slow-mo, slow-mo, and hyperlapse.

The most significant mode is Single Take, which records up to 10 seconds of video and then automatically generates up to nine different photo/video file types for sharing.

Apple has long offered a dead-simple camera app to iPhone users. The main viewfinder offers easy access to the wide-angle, standard, and 2x telephoto lenses, as well as the bevy of shooting modes. These include photo, video, time-lapse, slow-mo, portrait, and panorama. The far side of the viewfinder is where you’ll find buttons for the flash, live photos, and the timer.

While the Samsung app has more overall features, the Apple app is a touch easier to use. With these in mind, we’ll call the Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max camera app comparison a draw.

Winner: Tie


Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Camera shootout


Daylight

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample tracks and falls Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample bridge falls Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample tracks and falls

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample bridge falls

Daylight shots are where every camera should shine. There’s not a lot of greenery around just yet, but I did take the Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max comparison outdoors to see what’s what.

In these shots, you’ll see blue skies, brown trees, gray gravel, and lots of contrast. In fact, the iPhone shots are over contrast-y if you ask me. The S20 Ultra shots have less contrast but also a touch less color. In this series, I prefer the S20’s results over the iPhone’s, particularly because they are more in line with what my eyes saw when I took the pictures.

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


Detail

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample wide angle tracks Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample wide tracks Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample wide angle tracks

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample wide tracks

The amount of detail visible in these photos depends almost entirely on the exposure. For example, the S20 used a brighter exposure and thus lost some detail. In other instances, the S20’s brighter shot retains detail where the iPhone’s darker shot did not. More importantly, when you zoom in on these photos, the level of visible detail in the gravel and wood grain is about even. There’s no clear winner in this category.

Winner: Tie


Portrait/selfie

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample portrait Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample portrait Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample portrait

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample portrait

The Galaxy S20 Ultra has a time-of-flight sensor, which should help to take superior portraits, right? This isn’t necessarily the case.

As you can see in the samples here, the S20 was able to define me from the background very well, with a few rough edges here and there (look at my coat sleeve). The background is properly exposed, but my face looks overly pink. Worse, I’m not entirely in focus.

The iPhone did a slightly better job. My coat sleeve is smoother along the edges, and my face is much sharper. More to the point, color is a tad more accurate and there’s more detail in the background and foreground. Last, my face isn’t over-beautified.

As for selfies, the S20 messes up in a few ways. First, it mirrors the scene, meaning everything is backwards (you can see the reversed text on my jacket). You have to dive into the selfie camera settings to switch this. Second, the S20 smoothes over my skin a bit too much. The iPhone simply delivers here, whether it’s focus, color, bokeh effect, or temperature.

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample selfie Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample selfie Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample selfie

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample selfie

Again, it’s only by a hair, but I’m going with the iPhone this time around.

Winner: Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max

See also: Best Android phones for taking selfies


Color

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample color 1 Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample color 1 Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample color 1

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample color 1

In my experience, the Apple iPhone has always had an issue properly processing colors. Apple’s algorithms often generate a t00-warm cast to photos that isn’t necessarily accurate to the scene at hand. The iPhone 11 Pro Max still does this to some degree, but the effect isn’t nearly as pronounced as it used to be. That’s good news for the iPhone.

In these samples, the iPhone’s exposures are a touch darker than the Samsung’s. This allowed them to retain more detail and deliver richer hues. It’s very close, but I think the iPhone has the better balance of exposure and detail here. It’s particularly pronounced in the grain of the wood. Samsung is often known for over-saturating colors, but in these samples the colors come off as a little flat. I’m calling the iPhone the winner here, but only by a hair.

Winner: iPhone 11 Pro Max


HDR

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample HDR Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample HDR Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample HDR

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample HDR

HDR is meant to help balance out the light and dark parts of any given scene. In the sample here, I shot the underside of a bridge with the sun overhead. It’s challenging, given the reflectivity of the river on both sides. The Galaxy S20 Ultra nailed it the first time. It’s not perfect — some detail is missing in the underbelly of the bridge — but it’s very good. More importantly, the sky is blue, and the surrounding vegetation is properly exposed. It took the iPhone three tries to get this shot right (it blow out the sky on the first two attempts), and even then it still loses too much of the bridge to the shadows.

Samsung’s flagship delivers the better HDR shot.

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


Low light

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample low light 1 Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample low light 1 Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample low light 1

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample low light 1

This is a tough one. In the sample above, the S20 got everything just right. It captured the tone and color of the sky without under- or over-doing it. The iPhone simply didn’t get it right. Focus is really soft, which makes the clouds look more like a painting than a photo.

In the shots below, however, I think the reverse is true. The S20 blows out some details that the iPhone is able to keep. Moreover, the color is a bit richer in the iPhone shot and the focus is a touch sharper. This one is too close to call.

Winner: Tie


Night mode

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample night mode 1 Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera sample night mode river Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample night mode 1

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera sample night mode river

Both the S20 Ultra and iPhone 11 have night modes that are meant to really deliver in darker environments. In this shot, there was almost no light at all, and yet both phones managed to find enough to flesh out the scene. I think the color looks a bit more natural in the S20 Ultra shot, while it skews too warm in the iPhone shot. The S20 image is also sharper and less noisy. I’m giving this one to the S20.

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


Wide/zoom

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample wide angle Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample ultra wide Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample wide angle

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample ultra wide

Let’s talk about zoom for just a second. The S20 Ultra’s main selling point is absurd levels of zoom. The device has an ultra wide-angle camera that delivers 0.5x zoom, in addition to offering 1x, 2x, 4x, 5x, 10x, 30x, and, yes, even 100x zoom. Samsung’s S20 Ultra does this by blending its up-to-4x optical zoom telephoto lens with digital cropping of the 48MP sensor to reach the 100x claim. You can see in the samples below just how effective this really is.

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample 1x Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample 1x Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample 1x

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample 1x

Apple adopted this triple-threat approach to imaging as well. The iPhone 11 Pro Max has its own ultra-wide and telephoto cameras, though it is more limited. The iPhone’s zoom is capable of 2x optical and up to 10x hybrid optical and digital crop.

The S20 Ultra’s ultra-wide shots look very good, with solid color tone and good focus. By way of comparison, the iPhone’s shots look a bit washed out and flat. Similarly, the S20 delivers quite good 10x zoomed shots, while the iPhone’s max range of 10x zoom comes across as soft and more like a painting than a photograph. Toss in the S20 Ultra’s 30x and 100x zoom range (limited though it may be), and it’s clear which device wins this round.

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample 2x Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample 2x Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max photo sample 2x

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Photo Sample 2x

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Which wins?

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera modile profile times square

Based on the sample shots I was able to capture for this article, I’m going to call the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra the winner, but just by a nose. Some will surely prefer the warmer look to shots captured by the iPhone, and Apple’s device clearly takes excellent pictures in varying scenes and scenarios. I think the S20 Ultra edges out the iPhone 11 Pro Max due to its more flexible zoom range, better night mode, HDR, and daylight shooting. Yes, the iPhone does better with color and portraits, but not by much.

This concludes our Galaxy S20 Ultra vs iPhone 11 Pro Max camera comparison. What do you think? Did we get it right? Please feel free to share your opinions in the comments below, and be sure to check out our S20 Ultra vs Pixel 4 XL camera shootout as well.

Winner: Galaxy S20 Ultra


$ 1249 .99
Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max

Buy it Now

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max Buy it Now
$ 1249 .99

$ 1399 .99
Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Buy it Now

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra Buy it Now
$ 1399 .99

More posts about Photography


Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

The 10 best Canon lenses for your DSLR camera


Canon Logo CES 2020

Canon’s kit lenses are great, but at some point you need to step out of your comfort zone and get nicer glass. Those looking for the best Canon lenses have come to the right place. We have put together a list of our favorite lenses coming from the photography giant. We’ve included lenses from different price ranges and shooting styles to fit all users’ needs.

Best Canon lenses:

Editor’s note: We’ll be updating this list of the best Canon lenses regularly as new ones launch


1. Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM

Canon EF 50mm f1.8 STM Lens

Your first glass investment should be a 50mm f/1.8. I seriously shoot about 70% of all my photos with one, and Canon’s model goes for a mere $ 125. The 50mm focal length is great for general purpose photography, and image quality in such prime lenses is superb. The wide aperture also makes for amazing bokeh (blurry background).


2. Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS

Canon EF S 18 200mm f3.5 5.6 IS Lens side

Those who don’t want to be carrying around a bunch of lenses will find comfort in the Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens. The 18-200mm focal length offers enough versatility that this could very well be the only lens you will ever need. It is lacking a wide aperture, but you could still achieve great results with enough light.

Its only downside is a major one: it’s made for APS-C sensors. You will have to crop or live with a horrible vignette if you plan to use it on a full-frame camera. Otherwise, it’s a great investment at $ 699.


3. Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro

Canon EF 100mm f2.8L IS USM Macro lens side

Every photographer should have a good macro lens in his bag, and the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM is one of the best Canon lenses. A 12-inch focusing distance and 10mm focal length will let you get up close and personal with any subject. Meanwhile, an f/2.8 aperture can let plenty of light into the sensor while keeping a shallow depth of field.

Don’t miss: The best Canon cameras you can buy right now

The lens is made for shooting plants, insects, and other small objects, but you are not limited to macro photography. It can be used as a general-purpose lens too.


4. Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

Canon EF 24 70mm f2.8L II USM Lens

In the photography scene, the “holy trinity” is a trio of the best lenses a photographer can get. These can take care of most focal lengths while outputting maximum quality. The Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens is the first one, and the following two lenses complete the “trinity.”

This 24-70mm lens has an f/2.8 aperture and great quality optics. It is considered the king of standard zoom lenses, but it also comes at a price of $ 1,599.


5. Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L is III USM

EF 70 200mm f2.8L is III USM Lens side

The Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L is III USM Lens can zoom in even further while keeping a wide aperture. It is a great lens for those who need to shoot subjects from a distance. Sports, nature, and street photographers love it. It comes with a mighty $ 1,799 price tag.


6. Canon EF 16–35mm f/2.8L III USM

EF 16–35mm f2.8L III USM Lens

A 16-35mm focal length keeps you covered for capturing wide-angle images. It’s great for landscapes, large subjects, and crowds. The f/2.8 aperture is also great for letting in light and keeping a tighter control on depth of field. It’s expensive at $ 1,899, but it’s worth the price.


7. Canon RF 35mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM

Canon RF 35mm f1.8 Macro IS STM

Lenses listed above are great, but we know many of you are switching to mirrorless systems, for which Canon has created the RF mount. These new lenses mark a new age in the company’s business, as well as the industry. This is why the rest of the lenses on this list have an RF mount.

This is the first Canon lens with an RF mount you should get. Not only is it the cheapest of its kind at $ 499, but the 35mm focal length and f/1.8 aperture will make this a great all-around lens for general purposes. Not only that, but this lens has macro abilities and can focus at a distance of 0.56 feet or 0.17 meters from the subject.


8. Canon RF 85mm f/1.2 L USM DS

Canon RF 85mm f1.2 L USM DS

The Canon RF 85mm f/1.2 is one of the best lenses to come from the photography giant. The product is acclaimed by professionals in the industry for its build and glass quality. It is great for portraits and general purpose photography. We also can’t ignore that f/1.2 aperture, which will create an amazing separation between the subject and background. All of this comes with a hefty price of $ 2,999, but professionals will love it.


9. Canon RF 24-70mm f/2.8 IS USM

RF 24 70mm f2.8 IS USM

The 24-70mm focal length is considered part of the “holy trinity”, but this lens is specifically made with an RF mount for mirrorless cameras. This is a premium lens that will fit a wide variety of photo scenarios. With an f/2.8 aperture, the lens is also pretty fast. This is a premium lens and its price shows it at $ 2,299.


10. Canon RF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM

Canon RF 70 200mm f2.8L IS USM

The 70-200mm focal length range is great for getting up and close with your subject when you can’t physically get close. This RF mount lens is native to Canon’s mirrorless systems. It is praised for its smaller size, solid construction, and great image quality. Its f/2.8 max aperture is also very nice to have. You will have to pay up for the new mount and reduced size, though. This lens costs $ 2,699.


These are the best Canon lenses currently available! We’ll add new models to the list once they launch.

More photography content:

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Compact camera vs smartphone shootout: It’s not even close


https://youtu.be/kd5JVV99uZI

Point-and-shoot camera sales have seen a significant decline worldwide according to many studies. With smartphone cameras improving exponentially in the past few years, it raises the question: Are point-and-shoot cameras actually worth it anymore, or should you just buy a top camera phone? We decided to put it to the test with a compact camera vs smartphone shootout.

We pitched a high-end compact camera (the $ 600 Sony RX100 IV) against a couple of the top camera phones of 2019 (the Google Pixel 4 and Huawei P30 Pro). We took the same photos and videos with each device in “Photo” and “Auto” modes from the phones and camera, respectively. Portrait mode was also used where labeled. To put the devices through their paces, we shot a range of subjects in a myriad of lighting conditions. Low light, landscape, HDR, portrait, color, detail, selfie, video, and zoom aspects were all tested in this experiment.

We highly recommend clicking on each image to more closely examine the details. Also, all test images are available at full resolution in a Google Drive folder here.

Low light

For low light, I shot the front of a supermarket at around 6PM. At this point in the UK, the sky was completely black and the lights in the foyer were very bright. This would challenge the dynamic range and low-light capabilities of any camera system.

From a distance, the standout photo comes from the Pixel 4. It retains the color information in the store logo, whilst still showing the most detail in the car park. The Rx100’s image is easily the worst here. From the overexposed logo, to the lack of any detail in the shadows, the RX100 falls on its face compared to the other two. The Huawei phone sits in the middle as it keeps detail from both the highlights and shadows, but can’t quite get the color right on the blue banner in the middle of the frame.

Related: How are smartphone cameras becoming so good in low light?

Color

To test the color quality and accuracy of each camera, I leaned my mountain bike up against a bench in a park. This was on a relatively sunny day in an open space, to also push the dynamic range capabilities.

Instantly, the Sony’s image stands out due to its heavily overexposed sky, big flare on the fork, and lack of detail on the tires. The Pixel 4 seems to be the darkest image of the bunch, yet still retains more detail on the tires than the RX100. The winner is the P30 Pro as it captures the most dynamic range, whilst keeping the scene well exposed, and the colors accurate.

Detail

Next, I went to the beach and took a photo of a river running down into the sea. This would test detail in the tiny waves, as well as dynamic range. For the best look, I recommend clicking on each image to examine the finer details.

This set of testing is a little harder to compare, given that you really have to zoom in to see the difference in detail. The Rx100 really got to stretch its legs here as it has the only native 24MP sensor of the bunch and so its detail resolving capabilities are the best. The Pixel 4 provides a brighter image, but its version is a lot muddier when zooming in. The P30 Pro is, again, a middle ground. When looking closely, it doesn’t quite have the sharpness and detail of the Sony, but has more accurate colors.

Selfie

I took a selfie with each phone in my bedroom with a warm color source on the left and a cooler one on the right. I was stood in front of a 5600K softbox light. Naturally, the Sony is the favorite to win due to the fact that its main sensor is also the selfie sensor. The shots were taken on “Portrait” and “Auto” modes from the phones and camera, respectively.

With these selfies, I wanted to test skin-tone capturing performance as well as the portrait effect of the smartphones. Straight away, the RX100 has a tough time getting my skin right, giving the image a blue cast throughout. Granted, the sharpness is the best by a long shot, but it isn’t enough. The Pixel 4 gives the shallowest depth of field, but my skin is a bit too orange and the highlight reduction is a bit too aggressive. The best image is by the P30 Pro, thanks to its accurate color across the frame.

Related: Best selfie sticks for smartphones

HDR

To test the HDR capabilities to the extreme, I shot almost directly at the sun with a rocky wall and some buildings in the foreground.

Right off the mark, the Rx100 flares incredibly easily and has the least shadow detail. Seeing the buildings in line with the sun is relatively light work for the two phones, but the standalone camera really can’t handle it very well. The Pixel 4 seems to retain the most shadow detail as seen in the rocky wall. However, the P30 Pro handles highlights a lot better as illustrated in the clouds at the top of the image.

Zoom

My house’s chimney happened to be the subject of this set of tests. Each camera was dialed into its maximum optical zoom. The fine details in the bricks and chimney stacks should help us determine the camera with the best zoom.

At 135mm (Full Frame equivalent) the P30 Pro zooms in far further than either of its competition — it absolutely steamrolls the others in this test. The RX100’s 70mm and Pixel’s 50mm are woeful on paper when compared with the P30 Pro. However, even though the Sony zooms further than the Pixel, the difference in clarity, dynamic range, and color is crazy. I’d take the Pixel’s image over the RX100’s every day of the week.

Read more: Huawei P30 Pro camera review: Next level optics, low-light champion

Portrait

My friend Ross with a bucket on his head is the subject with floodlights above and a driving range behind him. There are wet golf balls on the grass reflecting light to create bokeh balls. The shots were taken on “Portrait” and “Auto” modes from the phones and camera, respectively.

The Pixel 4’s image doesn’t quite get the white balance right, opting for more of a warm tone. The background blur, however, emulates a much faster lens and produces larger bokeh balls. The RX100 pulls back the saturation a little too far and offers the greatest depth of field, here. The P30 Pro is a great representation of real life in terms of color, along with giving a nice soft background.

Video

For the video tests, I ran all three devices in video mode, handheld, as I stood above a beach near sunset time. All devices were set to a matched resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 or Ultra HD at 30fps.

I was fully expecting the RX100 to beat the other two. However, I was surprised to find the P30 Pro to be the best at taking video in this scenario. The stability is most gimbal-like, the dynamic range is the best, and the exposure is near perfect in this scene. The Pixel 4 gets close but isn’t quite sharp enough due to the less-than-perfect conditions. In the upset of the decade, the RX100 loses this test due to its footage being the most shakey, the worst exposed, and having the worst dynamic range.

Compact camera vs smartphone: The verdict

P30 Pro vs RX100 vs Pixel 4 camera stood up - Compact camera vs smartphone

I came into this shootout predicting that the RX100 would win more than one test. In fact, I would have thought that at the very least, it’d smash the others in the video comparison. Little did I realize just how far smartphone photography had come and how much better the images would come out compared to the compact camera. One pattern that reoccurred is that the P30 constantly gave the most accurate result, even if it wasn’t the prettiest. What I’ve learned is that there is little justification for an expensive compact camera in 2019. Your phone will likely do everything you need to it do, even better than the likes of the RX100.

Higher quality RAW photos are definitely the strong suit of the RX100, allowing for more data to be pulled from an image, allowing for far more processing headroom after the fact. But that’s not the idea of a point-and-shoot camera; the idea is to pick it up, take a photo, and put it down knowing that you don’t have to fiddle with settings or editing.

Smartphones are designed from the ground up with point-and-shoot in mind as evident in their heavy processing pipelines. Whilst compact camera makers like Sony are attempting to strike back (the RX100 Mark 7 has a 24-200mm zoom range!), the EIS, HDR+, portrait, and night mode innovations that we’ve seen on smartphones are straight-up outpacing them.

Compact, point-and-shoot cameras might not be dead, but that gap is closing and manufacturers like Canon, Sony, and Panasonic really need to wise up.

Buy The Huawei P30 ProBuy The Google Pixel 4Buy The Sony RX100 IV

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

This is the Google Pixel 4a: Punch-hole display, headphone jack, and a single camera


Google’s most successful Pixel to date is getting a sequel in 2020, and today we’re getting a first look.

Leaker Steve Hemmerstoffer (known online as OnLeaks) and 91Mobiles just published renders showing the Google Pixel 4a, expected sometime in the next few months.

As with other leaks from Hemmerstoffer, these images are renders built from CAD schematics of the device. Hemmerstoffer has an impressive track record, having published dozens of accurate leaks of high-profile devices over the past few years. That said, there’s always a chance that some details of the renders turn out to be inaccurate, so take them with the usual grain of salt.

So what’s interesting about these first Google Pixel 4a renders?

google pixel 4a leak renders 1

For one, the Pixel 4a will feature a punch-hole selfie camera in the upper left corner of the screen. That’s a first for Pixel devices – the Pixel 4 and 4 XL feature large top bezels, while the previous generation came with a sizeable notch.

google pixel 4a leak renders 5

Next, it appears that the Pixel 4a does not feature the Pixel 4’s Soli radar sensors – the top notch seems much narrower than on the Pixel 4, leaving no room for the necessary sensors.

The Pixel 4a features a rear-mounted fingerprint sensor, further suggesting that the phone will lack a 3D facial scanner. The loss of Soli should come as no surprise considering the gesture control system is disabled in some countries, including India, due to spectrum utilization restrictions.

google pixel 4a leak renders 8

Another interesting feature is the headphone jack on the top – like the Pixel 3a before it, the Pixel 4a will retain this increasingly rare functionality.

google pixel 4a leak renders 6

The Pixel 4a’s design is very similar to the Pixel 4, down to the shape of the camera module. However, the camera houses only one lens, which is pretty surprising, even for a device from Google. You can get amazing pictures with just one camera – the Pixel 3a is living proof – but dual- and triple-camera setups are so common that you’d be hard pressed to find a device with a single camera. Google continues to march to its own drum, for better or worse.

According to 91Mobiles’ report, the Pixel 4a’s screen will be 5.7-inch or 5.8-inch across. Thanks to the smaller bezels, the phone is said to be actually more compact than the Pixel 3a, at 144.2 x 69.5 x 8.2mm.

Also read: 5 additions and tweaks we’d like to see from Google Pixel 4a

These are all the details included in the report, but we can make some educated guesses about the Pixel 4a (and 4a XL). Judging from the specifications of the Pixel 3a, the 4a will be a solid, if not impressive performer. The camera will be similar to the Pixel 4’s, offering the same software features including Astrophotography. Hopefully, the battery will be beefier than the 3,000mAh unit found on this year’s model. As for the price, we don’t foresee any major changes – the Pixel 3a and 3a XL cost $ 399 and $ 479 respectively, and their successors are likely to be offered around the same price. Google could release the Pixel 4a a bit earlier than last year, though we can’t rule out another Google I/O launch. In the latter case, the Pixel 4a could be launched in mid-May 2020.

Likely Google Pixel 4a specs and features

  • Leaked so far:
    • 5.7-inch or 5.8-inch display
    • punch-hole selfie camera
    • 144.2 x 69.5 x 8.2mm (9mm including camera bump)
    • headphone jack
    • USB Type-C
    • fingerprint scanner (rear mounted)
    • single camera
  •  Our guesses
    • Plastic body
    • 1080 x 2160 resolution, OLED, Asahi Dragontrail glass
    • Qualcomm Snapdragon 765
    • 4GB of RAM
    • 64GB of storage
    • 12.2MP main camera, 8MP selfie camera
    • 3,000-3,200mAh

What do you think of these renders?

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

DJI Mavic 2 Pro: A superb camera drone


This is an excerpt from our full post on Drone Rush. Get all the specs and read all about the Mavic 2 Pro over on Drone Rush!

The DJI Mavic 2 Pro flying on a sunny day with blue skies Editors Choice badge

When it comes to drones, one of the best you can get your hands on is the DJI Mavic 2 Pro. Launched in 2018 along with the DJI Mavic 2 Zoom, the two are the same airframe, just with different cameras. DJI called them iterative updates to the original DJI Mavic Pro, but they offer significant improvements in almost every way.

Be sure to head over to Drone Rush for our full DJI Mavic 2 series review, for now, let’s explore some of the best features of the DJI Mavic 2 Pro.

DJI Mavic 2 Pro overview

DJI Mavic 2 Pro flying blue sky with a tree dr

The Mavic 2 Pro rocks a 1-inch camera sensor for 4K video capture at 100Mbps, multi-direction obstacle avoidance sensors for some of the safest drone flight possible, and much more. OcuSync 2.0 enhances connectivity to the remote control and other accessories, now able to transmit 1080p live stream video well beyond the legal line-of-sight.

The Mavic 2 Pro exemplifies the best that DJI has to offer.

As a folding drone, you get the best of a medium-size flying machine, with the portability of a large water bottle. DJI has mastered a number of flight features that we should all be able to take for granted, including self-piloted flight modes and a reliable RTH (Return to Home) failsafe. These features are exemplified in the Mavic 2 Pro.

To express our true feelings on the Mavic 2 Pro, we must discuss the camera. Equipped with a 1-inch Hasselblad sensor, attached to a 3-axis stabilized gimbal, the camera on this drone is hard to beat. We venture to call this the best camera drone under $ 2000, a crown previously held by the DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2.0. These two machines are similarly priced, and produce similar camera results, but the portability of the Mavic 2 Pro makes it an obvious choice for many pilots, as long as they do not need the payload capacity of the larger drone.

Mavic 2 Pro camera

DJI Mavic 2 Pro front close up on Hasselblad camera

Getting specific, the Mavic 2 Pro has a 1-inch CMOS sensor that shoots at 20MP with 4K video recording. The lens is a 28mm focal length with 77 degree field of view and variable f/2.8 – f/11 aperture.

Video capture offers up 4K resolution at 24, 25 and 30 frames per second (fps), 2.7K resolution at 24, 25, 30, 48, 50 and 60 fps, then 1080p resolution at 24, 25, 30, 48, 50, 60 and 120 fps. Video is recorded at 100Mbps data rate and saved in either mp4 or mov formats with H.264 or H.265 codecs. Further, you can choose Dlog-M or HLG 10-bit HDR mode.

See also

Capturing photos is done at that 20MP resolution, that’s 5472 x 3648 pixels. You’ll be saving files in jpg, the DNG raw format, or both. The available modes tell more of the story than the hard specs. You can shoot in single shot mode, which is the default, or choose from HDR, Burst shot, AEB mode, which takes 3 or 5 bracket frames or there is Interval shooting at two up to sixty seconds.

With all that data being captured, it’s fantastic that the Mavic series has both internal storage and a microSD card slot.

Photo and video samples over at Drone Rush.

Do we like the Mavic 2 Pro?

DJI-Mavic-2-Pro-flying-top

Oh yes, we certainly do. It is just as important to look at the series than anything. The Mavic 2 Pro may be our favorite, but the Mavic 2 Zoom and Mavic 2 Enterprise are compelling offerings as well. Only the Pro is equipped with the larger Hasselblad camera, but the zoom functionality, as well as the optional infrared camera on the Enterprise model, offer a set of tools and options that anyone can use. We do wish the consumer grade machines offered the same data encryption as the Enterprise model, but that is truly a niche need for many.

Get all the specs and read all about the Mavic 2 Pro over on Drone Rush!

The DJI Mavic Mini is a new breed of capable, for the consumer pilots out there, but allow us to make this very simple: The DJI Mavic Mini is a fantastic beginner’s drone, when you are ready to upgrade, you’ll want something like the DJI Mavic 2 Pro.

The DJI Mavic 2 Pro was $ 1449 at launch, but can be found for as low as $ 1349 during holiday sales.

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Related Sites

Powered by WP Robot

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