Tag Archive | "Samsung’s"

Huawei is repeating some of Samsung’s old mistakes


Huawei is a big name in the smartphone industry these days, having grabbed a significant share of the growing Chinese market and also gaining ground abroad in European and even North American markets. While the company has been releasing some very solid devices, critics may have noticed that Huawei seems to be falling into some of Samsung’s old pitfalls in the pursuit of catching up with the big two.

For starters, Huawei’s software, while improving, continues to be a weak spot in the company’s otherwise strong handset launches (an all too familiar feeling for opponents of Touchwiz and Samsung Experience). While opinions on the color scheme and look will vary according to taste, EMUI is still playing catchup to the best UIs. For example, it has only just included an app drawer as standard.

Solid processor, check. Impressive camera, check. Nice build quality, check. Top notch software, eh not so much. Sound familiar?

Huawei also still ships with a number of duplicate apps that consumers are probably never going to use, insists on odd tweaks such as “Knock Knock” swipes and knuckle gestures, and includes a ton of extra settings and options tucked away in the UI that, arguably, not many people need. While fun for those looking to customize their device, this suggests that Huawei can’t make up its own mind about which features are the most important for its users. EMUI 5 isn’t bloated per se, but it’s still in need of some refinement before it competes with the best.

See also:

What’s new in EMUI 5?

November 4, 2016

Speaking of software, Huawei hasn’t been the fastest at updating its older smartphones to the latest version of Android either, a complaint commonly levelled at Samsung too. While Huawei has released Nougat for some of its latest models, the older P9 and P9 Lite flagships have suffered from numerous delays after the company initially promised a Q1 rollout. Furthermore, the barely two year old P8 and Mate S aren’t going to receive an upgrade to Nougat at all, a bitter pill for the company’s long term fans.

Huawei can and must do better on the software and support front if it wants to win over premium tier consumers in the West.

Despite being less than two year’s old, Huawei has confirmed that the Mate S won’t receive an upgrade to Nougat.

Then there’s the marketing, the confusing crossovers, and the ever growing product portfolio. Huawei claims it’s cutting down on the number of ranges that it offers, but each of these now seems to be split into a wider number of handsets.

For starters, we have the new P10, P10 Lite, and the P10 Plus, a trio of different sized and slightly different spec’d handsets. While offering customers a selection at different price points is partly what has made Huawei so competitive, the Lite variant of Huawei’s flagships has always been a cutdown affair that offers consumers a slower processing package, less memory, and a more basic camera. The Lite is really a different mid-range handset disguised in the wrappings of its top-tier siblings, resulting in a quite different experience.

Huawei’s Lite flagship models are the equivalent of Samsung’s much maligned Galaxy S Mini handsets.

Samsung has done this in the past too. The Galaxy S Mini series repeatedly cut down on the hardware components found inside its flagship namesake, essentially offering customers a cutdown experience just because they wanted a smaller model.

We mustn’t forget the sheer number of tweaked models that the company offers as well, which just lately includes the Porsche Design Mate 9, Mate 9 Pro, Honor 8 Pro, P9 Plus and the P9 Lite options that are all floating around out there, and that’s not mentioning the various X and C revisions of the Honor brand too. Here’s an example of how ludicrous this can quickly become. Do you believe that many customers would know that the Honor 6X is actually newer than the Honor 7?

Samsung eventually abandoned its Mini range in favour of improving the marketing of its mid-range models. Huawei has Honor, so does it also need the P10 Lite?

Remember the days of the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus, Galaxy Note Edge and Duos, all of those Active variants, and the seemingly endless range of Galaxy A, C, and J smartphones? This type of convoluted naming scheme does little other than maybe tell consumers that a phone is slightly bigger than one another, and all the small variations make it almost impossible to keep track of the latest handsets.

As far as I’m concerned, the Mate and Note series should be the phablets from Huawei and Samsung, while the P and S ranges are the more reasonably sized flagships. This Plus sized nonsense is just marketing clutter from manufacturers that can’t make up their minds. OK, that’s enough ranting.

The new Huawei P10 is quickly turning into a controversial handset for the company.

Of course, the elephant in the room for Huawei right now is the debacle over the various memory options inside the P10. The latest revelation that Huawei has also skimped out on the oleophobic coating on the P10 screen is another example that makes the company look like it’s cutting corners and/or not undertaking proper quality control. Something that Samsung is all too keenly aware of after the Note 7 battery fiasco. And don’t forget that whole mess with the DSLR photo pretending to be from the P9 and the controversy over the Leica co-branding.

The big problem for consumers is that it makes it difficult to assess the performance and quality of what we’re buying. Samsung’s long running decision to release Exynos and Snapdragon powered versions of its flagship smartphones has left some consumers with similar questions. Performance enthusiasts often pursue benchmarks each year to find out if there’s any major difference between the two, although at least for Samsung the regional distribution of these models ensures that your next door neighbour isn’t going to receive a faster handset just thanks to the luck of the draw.

Huawei was surely aware of consumer interest in the differences between Samsung’s Exynos and Qualcomm powered handsets. If so, it would be naive to think that customers wouldn’t care about RAM and flash differences too.

That being said, it’s not completely unheard of for manufacturers to source components from multiple manufacturers to ensure adequate supply, but usually the end result is two models that are very difficult to distinguish. Apple does this with its iPhone modems, and Samsung, along with other OEMs, have sometimes sourced camera components from multiple manufacturers. I don’t think that I need to mention that Samsung and others have all had to contend with component shortages in the past too, nor that there’s customer backlash every time component differences are uncovered.

See also:

Huawei admits buying a P10 or P10 Plus is a bit of a lottery

2 days ago

Wrap up

I want to end by saying that these points aren’t intended as a slight against Huawei, as no manufacturer is perfect. Instead this is more an observation about the types of issues now facing the company and how oddly similar they are to others we have seen in the past.

Most of these complaints, if you will, are actually likely a result of Huawei’s massive growth over the years, and should improve as the company adapts to its new market position. Huawei builds quality hardware and now customers are demanding better software to match. However, the growing back catalogue of smartphones is making it harder to provide the longer term support that smaller manufacturers can afford. Meanwhile, selling a record number of handsets and expanding into new territories is clearly putting a strain on Huawei’s component supply channels, but this can hopefully be overcome as its purchasing power grows.

Global expansion is bringing new challenges for Huawei, and the company is going to have to tackle them head on if it is to reach the same heights as Apple and Samsung. If the company succeeds, then we’ll all be better off for the competition.

Android Authority

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Will the G Edge be LG’s answer to Samsung’s Galaxy S6 Edge?


samsung galaxy note 5 vs lg g4 quick look aa (3 of 10)

Earlier in the week, LG trademarked a number of Edge-related names, prompting rumors that the company could be preparing to launch a curved display smartphone that could rival the stylish looking Galaxy S6 Edge and S6 Edge+ from Samsung. There aren’t any remotely official looking details about such a device floating around right now, but with a second, even more premium smartphone on the way from LG later this year, anticipation is high that LG may have something planned.

What we do know is that LG has the right technology for such a device. The company has already released a handful of smartphones based on flexible display technology, which make use of both LCD and OLED panels types. OLED being the technological basis for Samsung’s curved active-matrix OLED (AMOLED) display in its Edge products.

LG-Chem-Plastic-Based-Truly-Flexible-OLED-Light-Panel

LG’s flexible OLED technology is some of the best in the business, but hasn’t made its way into many mobile products just yet.

However, the subtly curved display of the G4 and LG’s other mid-range products this year is based on its LCD technology, which is not particularly bendable. The G Flex range is based on LG’s P-OLED technology which is far more flexible, as can been seen by the slight flexibility lent to these phones. LG’s OLED technology is going to be the key if the company wants to produce more flexible phones in the future. However, the Flex phones have been much smaller releases for the company. We are yet to see a truly mainstream mobile product based on flexible OLED technology from LG.

LG’s major flagship displays are still based on LCD technology, while OLED is still being experimented with in the G Flex range.

Part of this is down to LG’s production setup. LCD has long been the backbone of LG Display’s mobile products, but the company has been transitioning to accommodate additional OLED production. This week, LG Display confirmed that it is to invest an additional $ 8.5 billion into development of next-generation OLED displays, for use in products ranging from TVs to flexible mobile electronics. The company is also bolstering flexible OLED production with a $ 0.91 billion investment into its 6th generation production technique, but these investments are going to take years to mature.

The other half of the battle is display quality, resolution and cost of production. Samsung has long been in the mobile AMOLED game, which has given the company plenty of time to improve its technology. LG’s latest P-OLED display in the G Flex 2 comes in at a lower 1080p resolution than the QHD panel found in Samsung’s latest phones. A QHD smartphone OLED panel is probably on the way from LG, but the company hasn’t announced anything yet.

The big upside with LG’s OLED technology is that it has proven to be extremely flexible and versatile. Recently the company showcased a selection of “wallpaper” TVs which are not only about as thin as a credit card, but also bendable for easy mounting. LG also has a selection of concave and convex TV designs, any of which could be adapted for mobile if needed.

The company can already produce these panels in a variety of sizes, but there isn’t a clear use case for this technology in a mobile product. Other flexible components, such as circuits and batteries, are not as advanced and are overly expensive at the moment, leaving us some years short from a truly bendable portable computer. LG’s curved mobile products are pretty much the most that can be done right now, although an Edge-type design is another possibility.

LCD-vs-Glass-OLED-vs-Plastic-OLED-thickness

A major move over to P-OLED could allow LG to build slimmer, cheaper, flexible mobile devices. Source

Plastic-OLED also offers a cost advantage over more complex LCD circuitry and pixel designs. The use of plastic, which enables a wide variety of flexibility, is also cheaper than the typical glass alternative for OLED displays. Although LG may not have been first with the technology, the company may be able to compete with a new slimmer design and a lower price point.

The mysterious dual-Edge LG prototype (below) is arguably our best look at what a future G Edge smartphone may look like, which would go directly up against Samsung’s design. However, the prototype apparently only had a resolution of 1280×720 pixels and a peak brightness of just 300 nits, well behind Samsung’s equivalent design. Although, LG has no doubt improved its technology since then.

The BlackBerry Venice also sports a similar look and is rumored to have a QHD resolution, but we don’t know who is manufacturing the display, it could be either LG or Samsung.

Curved Displays are hot

Perhaps, the G Edge, if or whenever it appears, will be LG’s first major flagship to make use of the company’s advanced OLED panels, but it’s not quite clear how close the company will be able to get to Samsung’s industry leading display technology with a first generation “Edge” product. A major global launch could also be some distance away, depending on how LG prioritises its OLED production capabilities. However, LG is betting big on a future in OLED and I’m sure we will see some exciting mobile products in the not too distant future.

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Will the G Edge be LG’s answer to Samsung’s Galaxy S6 Edge?


samsung galaxy note 5 vs lg g4 quick look aa (3 of 10)

Earlier in the week, LG trademarked a number of Edge-related names, prompting rumors that the company could be preparing to launch a curved display smartphone that could rival the stylish looking Galaxy S6 Edge and S6 Edge+ from Samsung. There aren’t any remotely official looking details about such a device floating around right now, but with a second, even more premium smartphone on the way from LG later this year, anticipation is high that LG may have something planned.

What we do know is that LG has the right technology for such a device. The company has already released a handful of smartphones based on flexible display technology, which make use of both LCD and OLED panels types. OLED being the technological basis for Samsung’s curved active-matrix OLED (AMOLED) display in its Edge products.

LG-Chem-Plastic-Based-Truly-Flexible-OLED-Light-Panel

LG’s flexible OLED technology is some of the best in the business, but hasn’t made its way into many mobile products just yet.

However, the subtly curved display of the G4 and LG’s other mid-range products this year is based on its LCD technology, which is not particularly bendable. The G Flex range is based on LG’s P-OLED technology which is far more flexible, as can been seen by the slight flexibility lent to these phones. LG’s OLED technology is going to be the key if the company wants to produce more flexible phones in the future. However, the Flex phones have been much smaller releases for the company. We are yet to see a truly mainstream mobile product based on flexible OLED technology from LG.

LG’s major flagship displays are still based on LCD technology, while OLED is still being experimented with in the G Flex range.

Part of this is down to LG’s production setup. LCD has long been the backbone of LG Display’s mobile products, but the company has been transitioning to accommodate additional OLED production. This week, LG Display confirmed that it is to invest an additional $ 8.5 billion into development of next-generation OLED displays, for use in products ranging from TVs to flexible mobile electronics. The company is also bolstering flexible OLED production with a $ 0.91 billion investment into its 6th generation production technique, but these investments are going to take years to mature.

The other half of the battle is display quality, resolution and cost of production. Samsung has long been in the mobile AMOLED game, which has given the company plenty of time to improve its technology. LG’s latest P-OLED display in the G Flex 2 comes in at a lower 1080p resolution than the QHD panel found in Samsung’s latest phones. A QHD smartphone OLED panel is probably on the way from LG, but the company hasn’t announced anything yet.

The big upside with LG’s OLED technology is that it has proven to be extremely flexible and versatile. Recently the company showcased a selection of “wallpaper” TVs which are not only about as thin as a credit card, but also bendable for easy mounting. LG also has a selection of concave and convex TV designs, any of which could be adapted for mobile if needed.

The company can already produce these panels in a variety of sizes, but there isn’t a clear use case for this technology in a mobile product. Other flexible components, such as circuits and batteries, are not as advanced and are overly expensive at the moment, leaving us some years short from a truly bendable portable computer. LG’s curved mobile products are pretty much the most that can be done right now, although an Edge-type design is another possibility.

LCD-vs-Glass-OLED-vs-Plastic-OLED-thickness

A major move over to P-OLED could allow LG to build slimmer, cheaper, flexible mobile devices. Source

Plastic-OLED also offers a cost advantage over more complex LCD circuitry and pixel designs. The use of plastic, which enables a wide variety of flexibility, is also cheaper than the typical glass alternative for OLED displays. Although LG may not have been first with the technology, the company may be able to compete with a new slimmer design and a lower price point.

The mysterious dual-Edge LG prototype (below) is arguably our best look at what a future G Edge smartphone may look like, which would go directly up against Samsung’s design. However, the prototype apparently only had a resolution of 1280×720 pixels and a peak brightness of just 300 nits, well behind Samsung’s equivalent design. Although, LG has no doubt improved its technology since then.

The BlackBerry Venice also sports a similar look and is rumored to have a QHD resolution, but we don’t know who is manufacturing the display, it could be either LG or Samsung.

Curved Displays are hot

Perhaps, the G Edge, if or whenever it appears, will be LG’s first major flagship to make use of the company’s advanced OLED panels, but it’s not quite clear how close the company will be able to get to Samsung’s industry leading display technology with a first generation “Edge” product. A major global launch could also be some distance away, depending on how LG prioritises its OLED production capabilities. However, LG is betting big on a future in OLED and I’m sure we will see some exciting mobile products in the not too distant future.

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Will the G Edge be LG’s answer to Samsung’s Galaxy S6 Edge?


samsung galaxy note 5 vs lg g4 quick look aa (3 of 10)

Earlier in the week, LG trademarked a number of Edge-related names, prompting rumors that the company could be preparing to launch a curved display smartphone that could rival the stylish looking Galaxy S6 Edge and S6 Edge+ from Samsung. There aren’t any remotely official looking details about such a device floating around right now, but with a second, even more premium smartphone on the way from LG later this year, anticipation is high that LG may have something planned.

What we do know is that LG has the right technology for such a device. The company has already released a handful of smartphones based on flexible display technology, which make use of both LCD and OLED panels types. OLED being the technological basis for Samsung’s curved active-matrix OLED (AMOLED) display in its Edge products.

LG-Chem-Plastic-Based-Truly-Flexible-OLED-Light-Panel

LG’s flexible OLED technology is some of the best in the business, but hasn’t made its way into many mobile products just yet.

However, the subtly curved display of the G4 and LG’s other mid-range products this year is based on its LCD technology, which is not particularly bendable. The G Flex range is based on LG’s P-OLED technology which is far more flexible, as can been seen by the slight flexibility lent to these phones. LG’s OLED technology is going to be the key if the company wants to produce more flexible phones in the future. However, the Flex phones have been much smaller releases for the company. We are yet to see a truly mainstream mobile product based on flexible OLED technology from LG.

LG’s major flagship displays are still based on LCD technology, while OLED is still being experimented with in the G Flex range.

Part of this is down to LG’s production setup. LCD has long been the backbone of LG Display’s mobile products, but the company has been transitioning to accommodate additional OLED production. This week, LG Display confirmed that it is to invest an additional $ 8.5 billion into development of next-generation OLED displays, for use in products ranging from TVs to flexible mobile electronics. The company is also bolstering flexible OLED production with a $ 0.91 billion investment into its 6th generation production technique, but these investments are going to take years to mature.

The other half of the battle is display quality, resolution and cost of production. Samsung has long been in the mobile AMOLED game, which has given the company plenty of time to improve its technology. LG’s latest P-OLED display in the G Flex 2 comes in at a lower 1080p resolution than the QHD panel found in Samsung’s latest phones. A QHD smartphone OLED panel is probably on the way from LG, but the company hasn’t announced anything yet.

The big upside with LG’s OLED technology is that it has proven to be extremely flexible and versatile. Recently the company showcased a selection of “wallpaper” TVs which are not only about as thin as a credit card, but also bendable for easy mounting. LG also has a selection of concave and convex TV designs, any of which could be adapted for mobile if needed.

The company can already produce these panels in a variety of sizes, but there isn’t a clear use case for this technology in a mobile product. Other flexible components, such as circuits and batteries, are not as advanced and are overly expensive at the moment, leaving us some years short from a truly bendable portable computer. LG’s curved mobile products are pretty much the most that can be done right now, although an Edge-type design is another possibility.

LCD-vs-Glass-OLED-vs-Plastic-OLED-thickness

A major move over to P-OLED could allow LG to build slimmer, cheaper, flexible mobile devices. Source

Plastic-OLED also offers a cost advantage over more complex LCD circuitry and pixel designs. The use of plastic, which enables a wide variety of flexibility, is also cheaper than the typical glass alternative for OLED displays. Although LG may not have been first with the technology, the company may be able to compete with a new slimmer design and a lower price point.

The mysterious dual-Edge LG prototype (below) is arguably our best look at what a future G Edge smartphone may look like, which would go directly up against Samsung’s design. However, the prototype apparently only had a resolution of 1280×720 pixels and a peak brightness of just 300 nits, well behind Samsung’s equivalent design. Although, LG has no doubt improved its technology since then.

The BlackBerry Venice also sports a similar look and is rumored to have a QHD resolution, but we don’t know who is manufacturing the display, it could be either LG or Samsung.

Curved Displays are hot

Perhaps, the G Edge, if or whenever it appears, will be LG’s first major flagship to make use of the company’s advanced OLED panels, but it’s not quite clear how close the company will be able to get to Samsung’s industry leading display technology with a first generation “Edge” product. A major global launch could also be some distance away, depending on how LG prioritises its OLED production capabilities. However, LG is betting big on a future in OLED and I’m sure we will see some exciting mobile products in the not too distant future.

Android Authority

Posted in Android NewsComments (0)

Catch Samsung’s Galaxy S6 presentation in this 60 second video


Did you get the chance to watch Samsung’s full presentation at MWC yesterday? No? Strapped for time to see it all now? No problem, funnily enough, Samsung was able to condense it down to 60 glorious seconds of Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge announcements.

As you may already know, Samsung’s Unpacked 2015 event at MWC offered onlookers little more than the announcements of the latest flagship offerings in the Galaxy S line. Obviously, the full minute of video above will give you the overview, from there, you best just check out our other coverage of the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge from Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

What do you guys think of the new Samsung Galaxy S6 and the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge?

Android Authority

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Samsung’s tough year ahead


A fresh new year is already well underway. CES is in the rear view mirror. MWC is on the horizon. Samsung has a tough challenge ahead to arrest its slump in profits and maintain its dominance of the smartphone industry. Can it cope with Chinese competition and falling prices? Can a combination of brand power and innovation help a slimmed down Samsung soar to new heights? One thing’s for sure – there’s a lot at stake this year for Samsung.

A year to forget

It’s tough at the top. The weight of expectation is enormous. The new narrative in town is that Samsung is in trouble. We heard that Samsung sold 40% fewer Galaxy S5s than expected. Mobile sales for Samsung hit a peak in Q3 of 2013 and they’ve been steadily declining since then and so, consequently, have profits.

Samsung Q3 2014 Profit

A couple of major trends have hit Samsung hard. Commoditization is driving the average selling price of smartphones down. Developed markets in Europe, the US, Japan and South Korea are saturated. The growth is in emerging markets like China, India, and Brazil.

Samsung is being significantly undercut by a wave of Chinese manufacturers that includes Xiaomi, Lenovo, and Huawei. Samsung is spending more on marketing and R&D, but charging less for its smartphones. Even Samsung’s South Korean compatriot, LG, is selling its flagship smartphones for less. To sum it up simply, the competition is getting tougher. We took a look at this in Samsung is falling, but who is rising?

How bad are things for Samsung really?

There’s plenty of room for Samsung to arrest the decline and it will maintain its dominant position for quite some time even if the downward trend does continue.

Let’s not get carried away here. Samsung generated $ 4 billion net profit in the third quarter of 2014 and it estimates the fourth quarter will be worth $ 4.5 billion. That doesn’t sound like a company in free fall. It’s more than Google made, and to put it in perspective, the ascendant LG’s net profit for the same period was $ 193 million.

According to Gartner Samsung sold 24.4% of all the smartphones sold worldwide in the third quarter of 2014, down from its all-time high of 32.1% for the same quarter in 2013. Apple was a distant second on 12.7% and then came Huawei (5.3%), Xiaomi (5.2%), and Lenovo (5%).

There’s plenty of room for Samsung to arrest the decline and it will maintain its dominant position for quite some time even if the downward trend does continue. But there’s also a dawning reality that the days of bumper profits from Android smartphones may be over. Everyone is already looking to the next new must-have category and most are betting big on wearables.

Cutting the dead wood

Failing to react to a slump will kill you. If that narrative about Samsung in trouble continues to gather pace it could become a self-fulfilling prophecy. The stock market is a confidence game. A continuous stream of negative articles about any company is going to impact consumers eventually. Just ask RIM and Nokia.

There are signs that Samsung is taking it seriously and addressing major criticisms.

Some of these moves are clearly designed to answer critics. Samsung has long been criticized for its throw-everything-at-the-wall-and-see-what-sticks approach to smartphone lines. The fact it doesn’t use premium materials in its flagships, preferring plastic, has garnered much derision. Complaints about the poor quality and bloated nature of its software and services have followed Samsung around like a bad smell.

Samsung Galaxy S5 Touchwiz 2

These are issues that have loomed large in the tech press, on forums, and in comment sections. If we’re really honest about it, there’s no evidence that the general phone-buying public cares about these things. After all, Samsung just beat Apple for consumer satisfaction according to the American Consumer Satisfaction Index.

Are these the right moves?

It makes sense for Samsung to scale back on software and services. It has failed to gain traction here. Why throw good money after bad? People are not going to buy into a Samsung ecosystem and there’s no way the company can afford to lose Google services that it can’t hope to match.

Tizen is being aimed at the budget market and possibly new device categories, it’s not a competitor for Android, as evidenced by the news it will support some Android apps. Maybe it will in the future, but that’s a distant prospect right now.

If Samsung does scale back TouchWiz and start producing premium metallic designs will it win over critics?

If Samsung does scale back TouchWiz and start producing premium metallic designs will it win over critics? Will people applaud it for scaling back its product lines? We’ll have to wait and see. The Galaxy S6 is obviously going to be key.

For all the criticism Samsung gets about copying, people forget that it significantly outspends the competition on research and development. It may not have created the phablet category, but it certainly popularized it with the Note line. The Galaxy Note Edge was one of the few glimmers of originality in the smartphone market last year.

samsung galaxy note edge review aa (8 of 26)

If Samsung can come up with a gorgeous premium design, optimize that software, and offer something innovative into the bargain, then it can turn the current perception around. But it’s a big ask to pull off the complete package in the forthcoming S6.

Check out our Galaxy S6 rumor roundup for all the latest speculation.

Is the budget battle worth fighting?

Going toe to toe at the budget end could prove tougher. Should Samsung even try to do it? Does it have to? Samsung exec Robert Yi was recently quoted on Xiaomi saying, “They are a mysterious entity. I don’t know where they create profit.” The truth is Samsung can’t match low prices and continue to spend big on R&D and marketing or the margin will be squeezed and squeezed. There’s a reason that Apple doesn’t compete in the budget market. Maybe Samsung should focus on the premium end of the market and seek out pastures new in wearables instead.

What do you predict for Samsung this year? Would you give it another chance if the S6 impressed you? Are you engaging in schadenfreude over the downward trend, or do you hope the company will return to form?

Android Authority

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Watch Reggie Watts and other disgruntled family members in Samsung’s new Note ads


reggie watts samsung

Samsung has always done some pretty great advertisements, especially with the help of some big name celebrities. In the latest “Do You Note?” advertisement series, Samsung has brought on the likes of Reggie Watts to help sell its newest flagship, the Galaxy Note 4.

Samsung’s Note 4 brought a Quad HD screen, a big 3,220 mAh battery, and much improved 16MP camera to the phablet world. While we feel as though Samsung’s Touchwiz overlay could use some work, the Note 4 is still one of our favorite phones of the year. If you’d like to find out more on the Note 4, check out our full review.

In the mean time, let’s talk ads. Samsung has released four new ads, and three of them feature a family that just can’t live without their Samsung devices. The first features a brother that needs to learn how to multitask, the next is about a sister that needs to take more selfies, and the last is about the father who can’t figure out how to charge his phone properly. Reggie Watts also takes on the phrase “S Penning”, as he is the featured role in the last ad. Take a look below!

[Do You Note?] My Brother Sure Knows How to Multitask! – Multitasking on GALAXY Note 4

[Do You Note?] My Sister Sure Knows How to Take Photos! – Camera on GALAXY Note 4

[Do You Note?] My Dad Sure Knows How to Take Charge! – Better Battery on GALAXY Note 4

S Penning GALAXY Note 4 with Reggie Watts

Which ad is your favorite? Oh, and how do you feel about the term “S Penning?” Let us know your comments!

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